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General David Hunter (1802-1886) on Horseback

Collections: 
Classification: 
Date: 
c. 1864
Medium: 
Black crayon on beige paper
Dimensions: 
Overall: 8 1/2 x 5 1/2 in. ( 21.6 x 14 cm ) mat: 18 x 14 in. ( 45.7 x 35.6 cm )
Description: 
Portrait
Credit Line: 
Gift of Daniel Parish, Jr.
Object Number: 
1904.10
Marks: 
inscriptions: Inscribed on mount: Gen. David Hunter at Monocacy, 6th Aug, 1864
Inscriptions: 
Signed at lower right in black crayon: "D."; old mount reputedly inscribed: "General David Hunter at Monocacy, 6th Aug. 1864"
Gallery Label: 
General David Hunter graduated from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in 1822. After attaining the rank of captain, he resigned from the army in 1836 to settle in Chicago. He returned to military service six years later, however, and served as a major in the Mexican War. In the Civil War he fought for the North and rose to the rank of major general. After the war, Hunter was a member of the honor guard that accompanied the body of President Lincoln to Springfield, Illinois.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
0
eMuseum Object ID: 
41407
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Pitchers (pair)

Collections: 
Classification: 
Date: 
1818
Medium: 
Silver
Dimensions: 
each overall: 11 1/8 x 5 1/2 x 4 7/8 in. ( 28.3 x 14 x 12.4 cm )
Description: 
Pair of wrought silver presentation pitchers; ovoid-shaped bodies with large chased ovoid flutes; each on an oval foot with molded footrings; applied oval necks with short, broad pouring lips, low on the sides; molded bands applied around the rims; cast double-scroll handles applied to the back of each; circular engraving on the front of each of Liberty freeing the Slaves, she holds a liberty pole topped by a liberty cap and is removing shackles from the arms of two slaves, a freed slave reading and Joseph Curtis raising a mirror to reflect the the rays of the sun rising over mountains in the background; engraved below the vignettes, "Act. 31.st March 1817/ Manumission Society of New York/ Joseph Curtis" in roman letters and script; maker's marks stamped on the base.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Clive Mecklem
Object Number: 
1928.23ab
Gallery Label: 
Engraved beneath the spout of each of these pitchers is a powerful scene representing the Goddess of Liberty freeing young slaves from their shackles. The pitchers were presented by the New York Manumission Society to Joseph Reuben Curtis (1782-1856) in 1818 as a testimonial to his tireless efforts in persuading the state legislature to pass an act mandating the end of slavery in New York. Curtis had a long and productive philanthropic career dedicated to emancipation and education. He cited his work securing passage of the Manumission Act in 1817 as one of the happiest events of his life.
Provenance: 
Joseph Reuben Curtis (1782-1856), who married Dorothy Hopkins (1778-1858); to their daughter Ella Maria Curtis (1816-1893), who married Lewis Gaylord Clark (1808-1873); to their daughter Mary Dakin Clark (1838-1916), who married George Green Mecklem (1834-ca. 1913); to their son Clive Mecklem (1865-1928), the donor.
Date Begin: 
1818
Date End: 
1818
eMuseum Object ID: 
39579
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

William Leete Stone, Sr. (1792-1844)

Collections: 
Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1825-1830
Medium: 
Watercolor on ivory
Dimensions: 
Overall: 3 3/8 x 2 1/2 in. ( 8.6 x 6.4 cm )
Credit Line: 
Purchase
Object Number: 
1949.38
Marks: 
Inscribed: on back:"My Grandfather/Col. William Leete Stone/on ivory, painted/by Rogers"
Gallery Label: 
The subject was born in New Paltz, New York, the son of the Rev. William and Tamson (Graves) Stone. From 1821 to 1844 he was one of the owners of the New York "Commercial Advertiser," and used that position to advance several causes in which he took a special interest, among them the Federalist party, the Erie Canal, and congressional emancipation of slaves. He also wrote historical novels and stories and several biographies. He was a member of the N-YHS executive committee in 1823-24 and 1843.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1830
eMuseum Object ID: 
36668
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Figural group

Collections: 
Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1860-1900
Medium: 
Earthenware
Dimensions: 
Overall: 8 3/8 x 5 1/4 x 3 1/4 in. ( 21.3 x 13.3 x 8.3 cm )
Description: 
Earthenware figural group depicting "UNCLE TOM & EVA", seated black male with book in hand holding white girl seated on his knee; oval base with lettering in relef highlighted with luster.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Mrs. Robert C. Taylor
Object Number: 
1945.392
Marks: 
painted: on base beneth figures in relief lettering: "UNCLE TOM & EVA"
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1900
eMuseum Object ID: 
35303
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Basket

Collections: 
Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1820-1830
Medium: 
Molded porcelain
Dimensions: 
Overall: 2 1/2 x 3 3/4 x 3 1/8 in. ( 6.4 x 9.5 x 7.9 cm )
Description: 
Rectangular molded porcelain basket with foliate edge and twisted handle with shell joints; black transfer printed view of kneeling figure in chains; painted overglaze enamel palm tree; gilt highlights on rim, handle and foot. Printed on reverse: "Remember them that are in bonds."
Credit Line: 
Gift of Mrs. Robert C. Taylor
Object Number: 
1945.381
Marks: 
printed: on reverse near rim: "Remember them that are in bonds."
Gallery Label: 
This small basket, transfer-printed with an antislavery image of a kneeling slave in chains, was probably made as part of a dresser set. It may have been sold at one of the many antislavery bazaars run by women. Fair managers often displayed antislavery slogans, such as the one printed on the underside of this basket, on walls and signs. The Biblical phrase, "Remember them that are in bonds," comes from Hebrews 13:3, and was also the title of an antislavery poem published in Boston in 1843.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1830
eMuseum Object ID: 
34520
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Lantern

Collections: 
Classification: 
Date: 
1750-1800
Medium: 
Tin
Dimensions: 
with handle extended: 14 x 6 1/4 in. ( 35.6 x 15.9 cm )
Description: 
Cylindrical tin candle lantern with conical top and hinged door in one side; pierced all over with small dots and dashes; circular band of sheet metal joined to point of cone serves as handle.
Credit Line: 
Gift of John Ward Dunsmore
Object Number: 
1941.444
Marks: 
handwritten in pencil: on paper label affixed to bottom: "Dunsmore / Coll."
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1800
eMuseum Object ID: 
33537
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Slave shackles

Classification: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Highlight: 
Display this item in the highlights
Date: 
ca. 1866
Medium: 
Steel
Dimensions: 
Overall: 4 1/4 x 23 x 1/4 in. ( 10.8 x 58.4 x 0.6 cm )
Description: 
Pair of steel ankle shackles; round cuffs with a soldered peg closure; four oval chain links attach the two cuffs.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Mrs. Carroll Beckwith
Object Number: 
1921.20
Gallery Label: 
According to a letter that accompanied these shackles upon their donation to the Historical Society in 1921, they were cut off teenage slave Mary Horn of Americus, Georgia, by Colonel William W. Badger of the 176th Regiment New York Volunteers, more than a year after Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation. Mary is said to have belonged to a Judge Horn, who riveted the irons to her legs with his own hands to prevent her from walking to the next plantation to see her beloved, George. George begged Colonel Badger to free Mary from her shackles and supposedly held her over an anvil while Badger cut them off.
Bibliography: 
Holzer, Harold and The New-York Historical Society. "The Civil War in 50 Objects." New York: Viking, 2013.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1866
eMuseum Object ID: 
33369
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Henry Ward Beecher (1813-1887)

Collections: 
Classification: 
Date: 
1887
Medium: 
Painted plaster
Dimensions: 
Overall: 29 3/4 x 16 x 12 1/2 in. ( 75.6 x 40.6 x 31.8 cm )
Description: 
Portrait (full-length).
Credit Line: 
Purchase
Object Number: 
1937.35
Marks: 
signed: proer left front corner of base: "JOHN ROGERS/NY" inscribed: front of base: "HENRY WARD BEECHER"
Bibliography: 
"The Fine Arts," The Critic, New York, Vol. 7, No. 182, June 25, 1887, p. 322. Partridge, William Ordway, "John Rogers, The Peoples Sculptor," The New England Magazine, Feb., 1896, Vol. XIII, No. 6, pp. 705-21. Smith, Mrs. and Mrs. Chetwood, Rogers Groups: Thought and Wrought by John Rogers, Boston: Charles E. Goodspeed & Co., 1934, pp.96-7. Wallace, David H., John Rogers, The People's Sculptor, Middleton, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 1967, pp. 108, 134, 212, 216, 222, 256-7, 273, 275, 286-7, 295, 297. Catalogue of American Portraits in The New-York Historical Society, New Haven: Yale University Press, Vol. 1, 1974, pp. 51-2. Holzer, Harold, and Farber, Joseph, "The Sculpture of John Rogers," Antiques Magazine, April 1979, pp. 756-68. Bleier, Paul and Meta, John Rogers Statuary, Atglen, PA: Schiffer Publishing Ltd., 2001, pp. 154-5.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1887
eMuseum Object ID: 
28976
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

"John Brown" pike

Collections: 
Date: 
ca. 1857-1859
Medium: 
Steel, wood (possibly ash)
Dimensions: 
Overall: 81 x 4 1/4 in. ( 205.7 x 10.8 cm )
Description: 
Wood and iron pike; cylindrical wood shaft with leaf blade, oval crossbar, and cylindrical socket fastened to top.
Object Number: 
INV.5736
Marks: 
Stamped on metal haft: "101"
Gallery Label: 
This is one of the pikes commissioned by militant abolitionist John Brown (1800-1859) from the Collins Co. of Canton, Connecticut in 1857 in preparation for his raid on the U.S. arsenal at Harper's Ferry in 1859. Brown intended to incite a slave insurrection and planned to use the pikes to arm slaves on Virginia plantations. None of the weapons were ever used by slaves, but they became potent symbols of Brown's raid. Each of the 1,000 pikes made for Brown by Collins Co. were individually numbered: this example is stamped "101".
Bibliography: 
Holzer, Harold and The New-York Historical Society. "The Civil War in 50 Objects." New York: Viking, 2013.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1859
eMuseum Object ID: 
21992
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Wounded Scout, A Friend In the Swamp

Collections: 
Classification: 
Date: 
1864
Medium: 
Bronze
Dimensions: 
Overall: 22 1/4 x 10 1/4 x 8 1/4 in. ( 56.5 x 26 x 21 cm )
Description: 
Genre figure: A bronze sculptural group featuring an escaped slave leading and protecting a wounded Union soldier who has been shot in the arm. The soldier has twisted a tourniquet around his injury and is still in his uniform. The slave is wearing ragged clothes. The bottom of the base is covered with plants from the swamp as well as a snake. Group bears Patent # 1967: June 28, 1864. Hollow second cast
Credit Line: 
Purchase
Object Number: 
1936.655
Marks: 
inscriptions: base center front: "THE WOUNDED SCOUT, FRIEND IN THE SWAMP" signed: center front of base: "JOHN ROGERS NEW YORK" inscribed: "PATENTED JUNE 28, 1864"
Gallery Label: 
This bronze served as the master model for the plasters that Rogers sold to a broad audience of middle-class Americans. One of Rogers' best-known and most highly praised works, Wounded Scout: A Friend in the Swamp depicts a Civil War Union scout who has been shot in the arm while on a mission in Southern territory and is weak from loss of blood. An escaped slave has come to his assistance and is guiding him through the swamp. Rogers had developed a nationwide reputation in just a few years for his small narrative groups depicting Civil War themes, but up to this point they had for the most part been amusing scenes of soldiers among themselves, such as The Camp Fire: Making Friends with the Cook (1936.714), or comforting vignettes of civilian life, such as the scene of flirtation titled The Town Pump (1932.101). Wounded Scout shows a soldier in genuine peril and addresses sensitive questions of race at the forefront of American minds both during and after the war. The sculptor had recently increased the size of his groups, and here he presented a simplified composition of two standing figures who, though small, project a gravity and pathos that belie their size. The soldier is dressed in uniform with a "U.S." insignia clearly visible on his belt and the strap of his cartridge box. He has torn open his sleeve and made a tourniquet to stop the bleeding from his arm, and the veins of his forearm bulge from the constriction as it hangs uselessly at his side. He appears faint as he leans on the shoulder of the black man whom Rogers described as an escaped slave. In a perhaps unprecedented move, Rogers heroized the black man. Though ragged and barefoot, he is tall and muscular. He supports the soldier protectively and looks up with an alert, commanding gaze. A copperhead snake is coiled next to his left foot, which, in Rogers' words, is "raising its head to strike the negro while he is doing this friendly act." The snake was a clear reference to Northern copperheads, politicians who opposed the Union war effort. Rogers released Wounded Scout at a particularly portentous moment in the war; General Ulysses S. Grant had suspended prisoner exchanges just a few months before, and a group of Union soldiers escaped from Libby Prison only weeks earlier. Rogers' depiction of a soldier injured, vulnerable, and, until his rescue, alone, would have struck an emotional chord for those with heightened concerns about their loved ones being captured. The artist sent copies to President Abraham Lincoln and the abolitionist Henry Ward Beecher, and in appreciation Lincoln sent his often quoted reply: "I can not pretend to be a judge in such matters; but the Statuette group 'Wounded Scout'-'Friend in the Swamp' is . . . excellent as a piece of art." Rogers' daring depiction of a strong, brave, and capable African American man sparked considerable discussion and revealed American concerns about freed slaves and their role in American society. The abolitionist poet Lydia Marie Child called it "a significant lesson of human brotherhood for all the coming ages." A Brooklyn writer betrayed stubbornly entrenched paternalistic stereotypes, praising how Rogers recognized "in a noble and touching manner, the service of the hitherto despised black race," which he characterized as "faithful, helpful, and uncomplaining." The sculpture was popular for many years after war, and it remained in Rogers' sales catalogue until almost the end of his career. It continued to function not only as an imposing work of art but also an agent of political dialogue during the difficult and contentious years of Reconstruction. In 1868 the New York Evening Mail called it a "powerful argument of the rights of the negro, and has had a wider influence than the most labored speeches of [Senator Charles] Sumner, or [the abolitionist Wendell] Phillips, or [Senator Benjamin] Wade." In 1872 the art critic Benson J. Lossing felt it necessary to elevate the white man by explaining the challenges of scout duty, which was given only to the finest soldiers, and he subtly suggested that the black man could not be credited with courage or intelligence because slaves often helped Union soldiers "more through the natural kindness of his heart than from any partizan [sic] feeling." The Civil War general Joseph R. Hawley summed up its multivalent meanings and emotional force when he declared that "Nothing relating to the war in painting or sculpture" ever surpassed it.
Bibliography: 
Articles, Scrapbooks of miscellaneous clippings, etc. about John Rogers, Vols. 1, 2, 3, 4, New York Historical Society. "Fine Arts," The Evening Post, New York, Mar. 22, 1864, p. 1. Tuckerman, Henry T., Book of the Artists, American Artist Life, Comprising Biographical and Critical Sketches of American Artists: Preceded by an Historical Account of the Rise and Progress of Art in America, New York: P. Putnam & Son, 1867, pp. 595-7. Wells, Samuel R., ed., "John Rogers, the Sculptor," American Phrenological Journal and Life Illustrated, New York, September, 1869, pp. 329-30. Lossing, Benson J., "The Artist as Historian," The American Historical Record, Vol. 1, no. 6, June, 1872, pp. 16, 242-4. Corner Stone, a Journal of Current Events, Vol. X, No, 31, New York, August 4, 1877, n.p. Barck, Dorothy, "Rogers Group in the Museum of the New-York Historical Society," New-York Historical Society Quarterly, Vol. XVI, No. 3, October, 1932, p. 80. Smith, Mrs. and Mrs. Chetwood, Rogers Groups: Thought and Wrought by John Rogers, Boston: Charles E. Goodspeed & Co., 1934, pp.66-7. Wallace, David H., John Rogers, The People's Sculptor, Middleton, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 1967, pp. 100-1, 105, 134, 148, 211-2, 295, 298-9, 304. Craven, Wayne, Sculpture in America, New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Company, 1968, pp. 357-66. Holzer, Harold, and Farber, Joseph, "The Sculpture of John Rogers", Antiques Magazine, April 1979, pp. 756-68. Bourdon, David, "The story-telling statuettes of John Rogers, 19th-century people's artist, are being eagerly collected again," Smithsonian, Vol. 6, No. 2, May 1975, pp. 51-7. Boime, Albert, The Art of Exclusion: Representing Blacks in the Nineteenth Century, Washington: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1990, pp. 104-5, 188-99, 232, 238. Bleier, Paul and Meta, John Rogers Statuary, Atglen, PA: Schiffer Publishing Ltd., 2001, pp. 90-1. Murphy, Laura, "Parian Ware and the Development of an American Identity," American Ceramic Circle Journal, Vol. XIV, 2007, pp. 133-49.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1864
eMuseum Object ID: 
18550
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

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