Coffeepot

Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1710-1725
Medium: 
Silver, wood
Dimensions: 
Overall: 10 3/4 x 6 1/2 x 7 3/4 in. ( 27.3 x 16.5 x 19.7 cm ) Silver Weight with wood: 34 oz (troy) 6 dwt (1067 g)
Description: 
Wrought and seamed silver coffeepot; round in plan with straight sides, seamed under the handle; tapered from applied, molded footring to applied waved band around the lip; hinged, molded domed lid with a scrolled rat-tail thumbpiece applied to the hinge and an applied, turned knop finial; s-curve spout, at a right angle to the handle, with a tapered wave pendent at the lip; oval joint between body and spout; round hinged spout cover; cylindrical handle sockets with oval body joints, fitted with a s-scroll wooden handle; engraved in the front center with the Robinson-Buckle family arms, a circle split with chevrons dividing each half in two; on the left chevron has three fleur-de-lis with two stags above and one below (Robinson); on the right, a plain chevron with two garlands above and one below (Buckle); all surrounded by a scrolled cartouche with an angel's bust at the base; stag engraved above, and a banner engraved, "PROPERE ET PROVIDE" (Robinson) below; maker's marks on either side of the handle, below lid.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Mr. & Mrs. Alexander O. Vietor
Object Number: 
1972.26
Marks: 
Mark: stamped twice at either side of top handle socket: "P. V. D" in oval surround Mark: scratched deeply on base: "-33-ons-7-p-" Note: mark consistent with Van Dyck from 1715-1748 Inscription: engraved at front center: the Robinson-Buckle family arm
Gallery Label: 
Crafted by silversmith Peter Van Dyck, this lighthouse-shaped coffeepot, with tall tapered body, high domed lid, and handle oriented at a right angle to the spout, is modeled directly after London prototypes made between 1700 and 1720. According to family history, it was owned by Beverley Robinson and his wife, Susannah Philipse, staunch Loyalists. In 1779, when the New York Legislature confiscated their extensive land holdings, the couple fled to England, bringing the coffeepot with them. Passed down through the family in England for nearly two centuries, the coffeepot returned to the United States when a Robinson descendent consigned the coffeepot to a London dealer around 1930, and, in a serendipitous transaction, it was purchased Beverley R. Robinson (1876-1951), a New York attorney and collateral descendant of the Loyalist. The engraved coat of arms was added in 1837 for the marriage of Colonel Robinson's grandson William Henry Robinson to Georgiana Buckle, daughter of the prominent naval commander Rear Admiral Mathew Buckle.
Provenance: 
[Possible descent: Frederick Philipse (1698-1751), who married Joanna Brockholst (1700-1765); to their daughter Susannah Philipse (1727-1822), who married Beverley Robinson (1723-1792); to their son William Henry Robinson (1765-1836), who married Catherine Skinner (1768-1843)]; to their son William Henry Robinson (1800-1858), who married Georgiana Buckle (1806-1903); to their daughter Henrietta Charlotte Robinson (1842-1923), who married Alfred Wright Surtees (1820-1906); to their son Henry Patrick Surtees (1868-after 1928); consigned by Surtees to Crichton Brothers, London, ca. 1930; sold to Beverley R. Robinson (1876-1951); to his niece Anna Glen Butler (1917-2005), who married Alexander O. Vietor (1913-1981), the donors.
Bibliography: 
Hofer, Margaret K. "Seventeenth-and eighteenth-century family silver." The Magazine Antiques 167 (2005): 156-161. Krohn, Deborah, Peter Miller, and Marybeth De Filippis, eds., "Dutch New York Between East and West: The World of Margrieta van Varick." New York: Bard Graduate Center, New-York Historical Society, New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2009, p. 322-3
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1725
eMuseum Object ID: 
34489
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Teapot

Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1695
Medium: 
Silver, wood
Dimensions: 
Overall: 7 1/2 x 8 3/4 x 5 in. (19.1 x 22.2 x 12.7 cm) Silver Weight: 16 oz (troy) 4.7 dwt (505 g)
Description: 
Wrought silver teapot; squat pear-shaped body on an applied reeded footring; slightly flared reeded rim with an engraved waved line below; high domed lid with a cast finial with a central knop; lid hinged onto the upper handle socket with a plain flange; straight seamed and tapered spout; handle sockets cylindrical in section and fitted with a wooden c-scroll handle; engraved on both sides, left of the handle are the Schuyler arms, a hand and a clothed arm cut off at the elbow holding a falcon with a ribbon about its neck, in a shield surrounded by foliate scrolls and surmounted by a falcon with a ribbon around its neck on an armored head; left of handle, leaf garland around a reverse cipher with the initials, "JES" and a chaplet of leaves and roses above; maker's marks on the base.
Credit Line: 
Bequest of Major Philip Schuyler
Object Number: 
1915.20
Marks: 
Mark: stamped on base, four times around the center punch: demi-horse or unicorn in a square Inscription: engraved at right of handle: "J E S" in a reverse cipher
Gallery Label: 
This vessel is possibly the oldest extant teapot made in New York. The attribution of this vessel to Kiliaen Van Rensselaer was first made in 1960, when the same demihorse mark was noted on a porringer made around 1696 for Samuel Bayard (1669-1746) and his wife, Margaret Van Cortlandt (1674-1719). The teapot bears the coat of arms of the Schuyler family on one side and a cipher with the initials of Johannes Schuyler (1668-1747) and his wife, Elizabeth (Elsie) Staats Wendell (ca. 1658-1737), on the other. The marriage chaplet above the cipher and the surrounding feathery wreath tied with a bow indicate that the teapot commemorates the couple's marriage and suggest a date of manufacture around the time of their wedding in 1695.
Provenance: 
Johannes Schuyler (1668-1747) and Elizabeth (Elsie) Staats Wendell (ca. 1658-1737); to their son Johannes Schuyler (1697-1741), who married Cornelia Van Cortlandt (1698-1762); to their son Philip Schuyler (1733-1804), who married Catherine Van Rensselaer (1734-1803); probably to their son Philip Jeremiah (1768-1835), who married (2nd) Mary Anna Sawyer (1781-1852); to their son George Lee Schuyler (1811-1890), who married Eliza Hamilton (1811-1863); to their son Philip Schuyler (1836-1906), the donor.
Bibliography: 
Hofer, Margaret K. "Seventeenth-and eighteenth-century family silver." The Magazine Antiques 167 (2005): 156-160.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1695
eMuseum Object ID: 
34411
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Ring in box

Classification: 
Date: 
1600-1712
Medium: 
Gold, diamonds, enamel; cardboard, velvet
Dimensions: 
Box: 1 x 1 1/4 x 1 1/2 in. (2.5 x 3.2 x 3.8 cm) Overall: 1/2 x 7/8 in. (1.3 x 2.2 cm)
Description: 
Gold cluster ring of Cornelia De Peyster set with 7 diamonds (5 table cut, 1 brilliant-cut and 1 eight-cut); shoulders are chased, remnants of black enamel on shoulder and underside of cluster; green and white cardboard box, ring compartment lined with taupe velvet.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Miss Cornelia Fulton Crary, through Mrs. Arthur T. Sutcliffe
Object Number: 
1952.331ab
Gallery Label: 
This ring was given to Cornelia De Peyster (1690-1756), who married Oliver Stephen Teller on October 12, 1712. The style of the ring suggests a date earlier than that of their wedding; this cluster style with enamel was popular in the 17th century, and the table cut for diamond was superceded around 1650 by the rose cut. The two briliant-type cut stones suggest later replacements of lost table-cut diamonds.
Bibliography: 
Krohn, Deborah, Peter Miller, and Marybeth De Filippis, eds., "Dutch New York Between East and West: The World of Margrieta van Varick." New York: Bard Graduate Center, New-York Historical Society, New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2009, p. 228
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1712
eMuseum Object ID: 
33056
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Seal matrix

Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1620
Medium: 
Silver
Dimensions: 
Overall: 1 x 1 3/8 in. (2.5 x 3.5 cm) Silver Weight: 1 oz (troy) 6 dwt (40 g)
Description: 
Cast circular matrix; obverse engraved with Van Rensselaer coat of arms at center (shield containing moline cross with close helmet above, flanked by foliate decoration, and crest of basket issuing flames); hinged openwork handle on reverse; part of chain attached. Star engraved on edge at top of seal. Unmarked. INSCRIPTION: "KILIAEN VAN RENSELAER." engraved on obverse around perimeter.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Kiliaen Van Rensselaer V
Object Number: 
1944.258
Marks: 
intaglio (inverted): on obverse: "KILIAEN VAN RENSELAER.[sic]"
Gallery Label: 
This seal matrix was used to facilitate communication between Amsterdam merchant Kiliaen Van Rensselaer (ca. 1580-1643), the first patroon and founder of the colony of Rensselaerswyck, and his agents in New Netherland. The matrix's configuration and design are typical of pendant seals made in the Netherlands and England during the early seventeenth century. The cast and engraved matrix identifies its owner around the periphery and bears the family coat of arms at the center: a shield with moline cross with close helmet above, flanked by mantling, and a crest of a basket issuing flames.
Provenance: 
Kiliaen Van Rensselaer (ca. 1580-1643), who married (2nd) Anna Wely (ca. 1601-1670); to their son Jeremias Van Rensselaer (1632-1674), who married Maria Van Cortlandt (1645-1689); to their son Kiliaen Van Rensselaer III (1663-1719), who married Maria Van Cortlandt (1674-ca. 1730); to their son Stephen Van Rensselaer (1707-1747), who married Elizabeth Groesbeck (1707-1756); to their son Stephen Van Rensselaer II (1742-1769), who married Catherine Livingston (1745-1810); to their son General Stephen Van Rensselaer III (1764-1839), who married (2nd) Cornelia Paterson (1780-1849); to their son William Paterson Van Rensselaer (1805-1872), who married (2nd) Sarah Rogers (1810-1887); to their son Kiliaen Van Rensselaer IV (1845-1905), who married Olivia Phelps Atterbury (1848-1923); to their son Kiliaen Van Rensselaer V (1879-1949), the donor.
Bibliography: 
Krohn, Deborah, Peter Miller, and Marybeth De Filippis, eds., "Dutch New York Between East and West: The World of Margrieta van Varick." New York: Bard Graduate Center, New-York Historical Society, New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2009, p. 178-179
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1620
eMuseum Object ID: 
30887
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Jar

Classification: 
Date: 
1650-1750
Medium: 
Tin-glazed earthenware
Dimensions: 
Overall: 4 1/2 x 3 1/8 in. ( 11.4 x 7.9 cm )
Description: 
Wheelthrown white earthenware cylindrical jar with concave sides, rounded base and shoulder, with handpainted underglaze blue decoration of a shield with lion set in scrolling framework with crown, tin-glazed.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Dr. Fenwick Beekman
Object Number: 
1954.22a
Gallery Label: 
Part of a set of 3 jars, 1954.22a-c
Bibliography: 
Krohn, Deborah, Peter Miller, and Marybeth De Filippis, eds., "Dutch New York Between East and West: The World of Margrieta van Varick." New York: Bard Graduate Center, New-York Historical Society, New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2009, p. 300-1
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1750
eMuseum Object ID: 
30502
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Trivet

Classification: 
Date: 
1650-1750
Medium: 
Iron
Dimensions: 
Overall: 6 7/8 x 19 1/2 x 6 in. ( 17.5 x 49.5 x 15.2 cm )
Description: 
Wrought iron trivet with star shape pierced in center of plate with engraving; hook-shaped leg and bracket hinged at handle terminus; baluster ornament on handle.
Object Number: 
Z.1223
Bibliography: 
Krohn, Deborah, Peter Miller, and Marybeth De Filippis, eds., "Dutch New York Between East and West: The World of Margrieta van Varick." New York: Bard Graduate Center, New-York Historical Society, New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2009, p. 303
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1750
eMuseum Object ID: 
29443
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Bedcover or wall hanging (palampore)

Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1720-1740
Medium: 
Cotton, linen, paint
Dimensions: 
Overall: 78 1/2 x 52 1/2 x 1/4 in. ( 199.4 x 133.4 x 0.6 cm )
Description: 
Painted pieced cotton bedcover or wall hanging (palampore) with ornate flowering tree in center panel ("Indian Veil" or Tree of Life design) and border with scrolling vine; blue, red, brown, and black on natural ground; linen backing (not original).
Credit Line: 
Gift of Mrs. J. Insley Blair
Object Number: 
1938.1
Gallery Label: 
The word "palampore" derives from the Persian and Hindi word "palangposh," or bedcover. Palampores are mentioned in the records of the English East India Company as early as 1614, and a number of them with histories of eighteenth-century ownership survive in the United States (see "Textiles in America, 1650-1870," p. 314).
Bibliography: 
Krohn, Deborah, Peter Miller, and Marybeth De Filippis, eds., "Dutch New York Between East and West: The World of Margrieta van Varick." New York: Bard Graduate Center, New-York Historical Society, New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2009, p. iix; 266-7
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1740
eMuseum Object ID: 
29005
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Posnet with lid

Classification: 
Date: 
1700-1800
Medium: 
Iron
Dimensions: 
Overall: 6 1/4 x 17 1/4 x 9 1/2 in. ( 15.9 x 43.8 x 24.1 cm )
Description: 
Cast iron spider (footed skillet) with a flat bottom, slat sides, three splayed legs (triangular in section) and a long, brazed handle; slightly domed lid with central D-shaped handle, triangular in section, and erect rim.
Object Number: 
2477
Gallery Label: 
A spider (also called a spider skillet, spider pan, or iron spider) was an iron vessel with three splayed legs and a long handle used for hearth cooking. The footed skillet or frying pan would be set over a small pile of coals pulled out onto the hearth from the fire. Additional coals could be placed on the lid of this particular example. The basic design of these cooking vessels originated in Europe and remained unchanged throughout the eighteenth century in North America. The use of the term "spider", presumably for its similarity in appearance to an arachnid, is distinctly American in origin. By the end of the nineteenth century, spiders—restyled without legs for the stove top—were still in use called by their old name.
Bibliography: 
Krohn, Deborah, Peter Miller, and Marybeth De Filippis, eds., "Dutch New York Between East and West: The World of Margrieta van Varick." New York: Bard Graduate Center, New-York Historical Society, New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2009, p. 302
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1800
eMuseum Object ID: 
28862
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Butterfield dial and case

Date: 
1685-1715
Medium: 
Silver, glass, wood, leather, velvet
Dimensions: 
Case: 1/2 x 3 x 2 5/8 in. (1.3 x 7.6 x 6.7 cm) Overall: 1/4 x 2 5/8 x 2 1/4 in. (0.6 x 6.7 x 5.7 cm)
Description: 
Octagonal Butterfield dial with elaborate engraved markings on front and back; circular compass encased in silver, with face visible through glass window in surface of sundial; folding gnomon with shaped edge, intricately detailed engraving, and hinge in the form of a bird; octagonal red leather covered case with beige velvet lining.
Credit Line: 
Gift of the Half Moon Committee of the Hudson-Fulton Exhibition, 1909
Object Number: 
1910.32ab
Marks: 
engraved: on obverse, near center (twice): "40 degre" engraved: on obverse, on two edges of octagon: "Pour 55" engraved: on reverse, bottom edge: "N. BION A PARIS" engraved: on reverse, in concentric circles: "Marseille 43 Varsovie 52 Amsterdam 52 Stra
Gallery Label: 
The numbers engraved adjacent to city names on the reverse of this object indicate their latitude.
Bibliography: 
Krohn, Deborah, Peter Miller, and Marybeth De Filippis, eds., "Dutch New York Between East and West: The World of Margrieta van Varick." New York: Bard Graduate Center, New-York Historical Society, New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2009, p. 139-140
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1715
eMuseum Object ID: 
28211
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Charger

Classification: 
Date: 
1689-1705
Medium: 
Earthenware
Dimensions: 
Overall: 1 3/4 x 12 in. ( 4.4 x 30.5 cm )
Description: 
Tin-glazed earthenware charger with King William III seated beneath a canopy with initials "KW" to side painted in purple, yellow, and blue center with purple and yellow drapery-like motifs on brim; charger has buff-colored earthenware body with foot ring with opaque white tin-glaze on obverse, clear lead-glaze on reverse; three stilt marks on obverse.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Katharine Prentis Murphy
Object Number: 
1951.597
Marks: 
painted: on obverse; "KW"
Gallery Label: 
King William III ruled England from 1689 to 1702.
Bibliography: 
Denker, Ellen Paul. "Collector' legacies." The Magazine Antiques 167 (2005): 176-180. Krohn, Deborah, Peter Miller, and Marybeth De Filippis, eds., "Dutch New York Between East and West: The World of Margrieta van Varick." New York: Bard Graduate Center, New-York Historical Society, New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2009, p. 209
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1705
eMuseum Object ID: 
24468
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

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Creative: Tronvig Group