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Paper doll

Classification: 
Date: 
1830-1860
Medium: 
Paper, paint
Dimensions: 
Overall: 6 1/2 x 5 1/4 in. ( 16.5 x 13.3 cm )
Description: 
Painted cut-out paper figure: seated woman trimming a hat, with little girl looking on.
Credit Line: 
Purchased from Elie Nadelman
Object Number: 
1937.1794n
Marks: 
written: in ink on reverse: "Eliza / Minnie."
Gallery Label: 
Portraying mostly women and children as they perform domestic tasks (sewing, cooking, harvesting, or teaching/learning) and leisure activities (reading, writing letters, painting, or playing music), these richly decorated, hand-painted paper dolls present a broad view of mid-nineteenth-century daily life. The mass commercial appeal of paper dolls arose around 1850 when these dolls began to appear in popular periodicals; however, homemade, hand-painted dolls had been circulating long beforehand. These dolls belong to a larger set of 85 figures, which were crafted around 1855 for a young girl in the Canadian town of Drummondville outside Quebec City, as indicated by an inscription on the reverse of one doll in the set and by a November 1924 article in Harper's Magazine featuring a descendent of the original owner, Ms. Lenox E. Chase. While it is unclear who painted these dolls, and while they may have been produced over an extended period of time given variations in the stock and coloration of the paper, all of the dolls seem to have been crafted by the same artist and each one includes its own unique name, written on the verso by the same hand each time. Genealogical records suggest that the dolls originally belonged to the Sutherland family, a Canadian family of British descent who had arrived in the English-Canadian town of Drummondville by the 1840's, and the dolls eventually would have been passed down to Ms. Chase, from whom Elie Nadelman likely acquired the set for his Museum of Folk and Peasant Arts. This object was once part of the folk art collection of Elie Nadelman (1882-1946), the avant-garde sculptor. From 1924 to 1934, Nadelman's collection was displayed in his Museum of Folk Arts, located in the Riverdale section of the Bronx. The Historical Society purchased Nadelman's entire collection in 1937.
Provenance: 
The Folk Art Collection of Elie Nadelman
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1860
eMuseum Object ID: 
44754
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Paper doll

Classification: 
Date: 
1830-1860
Medium: 
Paper, paint
Dimensions: 
Overall: 6 3/4 x 6 1/4 in. ( 17.1 x 15.9 cm )
Description: 
Painted cut-out paper figure: woman working at long red table preparing poultry for cooking, with oven in the background.
Credit Line: 
Purchased from Elie Nadelman
Object Number: 
1937.1794l
Marks: 
written: in ink on reverse: "Susannah."
Gallery Label: 
Portraying mostly women and children as they perform domestic tasks (sewing, cooking, harvesting, or teaching/learning) and leisure activities (reading, writing letters, painting, or playing music), these richly decorated, hand-painted paper dolls present a broad view of mid-nineteenth-century daily life. The mass commercial appeal of paper dolls arose around 1850 when these dolls began to appear in popular periodicals; however, homemade, hand-painted dolls had been circulating long beforehand. These dolls belong to a larger set of 85 figures, which were crafted around 1855 for a young girl in the Canadian town of Drummondville outside Quebec City, as indicated by an inscription on the reverse of one doll in the set and by a November 1924 article in Harper's Magazine featuring a descendent of the original owner, Ms. Lenox E. Chase. While it is unclear who painted these dolls, and while they may have been produced over an extended period of time given variations in the stock and coloration of the paper, all of the dolls seem to have been crafted by the same artist and each one includes its own unique name, written on the verso by the same hand each time. Genealogical records suggest that the dolls originally belonged to the Sutherland family, a Canadian family of British descent who had arrived in the English-Canadian town of Drummondville by the 1840's, and the dolls eventually would have been passed down to Ms. Chase, from whom Elie Nadelman likely acquired the set for his Museum of Folk and Peasant Arts. This object was once part of the folk art collection of Elie Nadelman (1882-1946), the avant-garde sculptor. From 1924 to 1934, Nadelman's collection was displayed in his Museum of Folk Arts, located in the Riverdale section of the Bronx. The Historical Society purchased Nadelman's entire collection in 1937.
Provenance: 
The Folk Art Collection of Elie Nadelman
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1860
eMuseum Object ID: 
44710
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Paper doll

Classification: 
Date: 
1830-1860
Medium: 
Paper, paint
Dimensions: 
Overall: 6 x 6 3/8 in. ( 15.2 x 16.2 cm )
Description: 
Painted cut-out paper figure: young women seated at a slant-top desk doing a watercolor painting of a floral subject.
Credit Line: 
Purchased from Elie Nadelman
Object Number: 
1937.1794e
Marks: 
written: in ink on reverse: "Elma"
Gallery Label: 
Portraying mostly women and children as they perform domestic tasks (sewing, cooking, harvesting, or teaching/learning) and leisure activities (reading, writing letters, painting, or playing music), these richly decorated, hand-painted paper dolls present a broad view of mid-nineteenth-century daily life. The mass commercial appeal of paper dolls arose around 1850 when these dolls began to appear in popular periodicals; however, homemade, hand-painted dolls had been circulating long beforehand. These dolls belong to a larger set of 85 figures, which were crafted around 1855 for a young girl in the Canadian town of Drummondville outside Quebec City, as indicated by an inscription on the reverse of one doll in the set and by a November 1924 article in Harper's Magazine featuring a descendent of the original owner, Ms. Lenox E. Chase. While it is unclear who painted these dolls, and while they may have been produced over an extended period of time given variations in the stock and coloration of the paper, all of the dolls seem to have been crafted by the same artist and each one includes its own unique name, written on the verso by the same hand each time. Genealogical records suggest that the dolls originally belonged to the Sutherland family, a Canadian family of British descent who had arrived in the English-Canadian town of Drummondville by the 1840's, and the dolls eventually would have been passed down to Ms. Chase, from whom Elie Nadelman likely acquired the set for his Museum of Folk and Peasant Arts. This object was once part of the folk art collection of Elie Nadelman (1882-1946), the avant-garde sculptor. From 1924 to 1934, Nadelman's collection was displayed in his Museum of Folk Arts, located in the Riverdale section of the Bronx. The Historical Society purchased Nadelman's entire collection in 1937.
Provenance: 
The Folk Art Collection of Elie Nadelman
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1860
eMuseum Object ID: 
44708
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Paper doll

Classification: 
Date: 
1830-1860
Medium: 
Paper, paint
Dimensions: 
Overall: 8 1/4 x 8 in. ( 21 x 20.3 cm )
Description: 
Painted cut-out paper figure: young woman playing an accordion.
Credit Line: 
Purchased from Elie Nadelman
Object Number: 
1937.1794c
Marks: 
written: in ink on reverse: "Clara"
Gallery Label: 
Portraying mostly women and children as they perform domestic tasks (sewing, cooking, harvesting, or teaching/learning) and leisure activities (reading, writing letters, painting, or playing music), these richly decorated, hand-painted paper dolls present a broad view of mid-nineteenth-century daily life. The mass commercial appeal of paper dolls arose around 1850 when these dolls began to appear in popular periodicals; however, homemade, hand-painted dolls had been circulating long beforehand. These dolls belong to a larger set of 85 figures, which were crafted around 1855 for a young girl in the Canadian town of Drummondville outside Quebec City, as indicated by an inscription on the reverse of one doll in the set and by a November 1924 article in Harper's Magazine featuring a descendent of the original owner, Ms. Lenox E. Chase. While it is unclear who painted these dolls, and while they may have been produced over an extended period of time given variations in the stock and coloration of the paper, all of the dolls seem to have been crafted by the same artist and each one includes its own unique name, written on the verso by the same hand each time. Genealogical records suggest that the dolls originally belonged to the Sutherland family, a Canadian family of British descent who had arrived in the English-Canadian town of Drummondville by the 1840's, and the dolls eventually would have been passed down to Ms. Chase, from whom Elie Nadelman likely acquired the set for his Museum of Folk and Peasant Arts. This object was once part of the folk art collection of Elie Nadelman (1882-1946), the avant-garde sculptor. From 1924 to 1934, Nadelman's collection was displayed in his Museum of Folk Arts, located in the Riverdale section of the Bronx. The Historical Society purchased Nadelman's entire collection in 1937.
Provenance: 
The Folk Art Collection of Elie Nadelman
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1860
eMuseum Object ID: 
44707
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Nutmeg grater/tobacco shredder

Date: 
ca. 1675-1775
Medium: 
Wood, iron
Dimensions: 
Overall: 5 3/4 x 2 in. ( 14.6 x 5.1 cm )
Description: 
Wood nutmeg grater with curved sides and pointed top, chip carved throughout; lid hinges on an iron pin at base, covering pierced sheet iron grater.
Credit Line: 
Purchased from Elie Nadelman, 1937
Object Number: 
INV.749
Inscriptions: 
hand-written: collector's label affixed to reverse: "449/French"
Gallery Label: 
This object was once part of the folk art collection of Elie Nadelman (1882-1946), the avant-garde sculptor. From 1924 to 1934, Nadelman's collection was displayed in his Museum of Folk Arts, located in the Riverdale section of the Bronx. The Historical Society purchased Nadelman's entire collection in 1937.
Provenance: 
The Folk Art Collection of Elie Nadelman
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1775
eMuseum Object ID: 
44602
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Nutmeg grater/tobacco shredder

Date: 
ca. 1650-1750
Medium: 
Wood
Dimensions: 
Overall: 9 1/2 x 2 1/2 x 3/4 in. ( 24.1 x 6.4 x 1.9 cm )
Description: 
Wooden nutmeg grater with kneeling figure (possibly St. Francis), "IHS", and shell motifs carved in obverse; flower carved in reverse as well as cavity to hold ground nutmeg.
Credit Line: 
Purchased from Elie Nadelman, 1937
Object Number: 
INV.745
Inscriptions: 
handwritten label: collector's label affixed to reverse: "2592 / Fr"
Gallery Label: 
This object was once part of the folk art collection of Elie Nadelman (1882-1946), the avant-garde sculptor. From 1924 to 1934, Nadelman's collection was displayed in his Museum of Folk Arts, located in the Riverdale section of the Bronx. The Historical Society purchased Nadelman's entire collection in 1937.
Provenance: 
The Folk Art Collection of Elie Nadelman
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1750
eMuseum Object ID: 
44549
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Poffertje pan

Classification: 
Date: 
1800-1900
Medium: 
Brass, copper, tin
Dimensions: 
Overall: 8 x 14 1/4 in. ( 20.3 x 36.2 cm )
Description: 
Tinned brass circular pan with two copper feet (one missing) and two copper handles that may have been added at a different time; pan incorporates seven molds.
Credit Line: 
Purchased from Elie Nadelman
Object Number: 
1937.1309
Gallery Label: 
This object was once part of the folk art collection of Elie Nadelman (1882-1946), the avant-garde sculptor. From 1924 to 1934, Nadelman's collection was displayed in his Museum of Folk Arts, located in the Riverdale section of the Bronx. The Historical Society purchased Nadelman's entire collection in 1937.
Provenance: 
The Folk Art Collection of Elie Nadelman
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1900
eMuseum Object ID: 
44508
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Pastry jagger: carved handle

Date: 
ca. 1800-1850
Medium: 
Whale bone
Dimensions: 
Overall: 5 3/4 x 1 3/4 x 1/2 in. ( 14.6 x 4.4 x 1.3 cm )
Description: 
Scrimshaw pastry jagger (pastry crimper) with crimped wheel and curved crimper at opposite end; curved sides and bands diagonal lines carved at end of handles.
Credit Line: 
Purchased from Elie Nadelman
Object Number: 
1937.1747
Gallery Label: 
This object was once part of the folk art collection of Elie Nadelman (1882-1946), the avant-garde sculptor. From 1924 to 1934, Nadelman's collection was displayed in his Museum of Folk Arts, located in the Riverdale section of the Bronx. The Historical Society purchased Nadelman's entire collection in 1937.
Provenance: 
The Folk Art Collection of Elie Nadelman
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1850
eMuseum Object ID: 
44507
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Clothespin

Date: 
1750-1850
Medium: 
Wood
Dimensions: 
Overall: 5 1/8 x 1 1/4 x 1/2 in. ( 13 x 3.2 x 1.3 cm )
Description: 
Clothespin made from single piece of wood with hole pierced in square body and two legs with pointed ends.
Credit Line: 
Purchased from Elie Nadelman, 1937
Object Number: 
Z.70
Inscriptions: 
hand written: collector's label affixed to body: "2371 / Am."
Gallery Label: 
This object was once part of the folk art collection of Elie Nadelman (1882-1946), the avant-garde sculptor. From 1924 to 1934, Nadelman's collection was displayed in his Museum of Folk Arts, located in the Riverdale section of the Bronx. The Historical Society purchased Nadelman's entire collection in 1937.
Provenance: 
The Folk Art Collection of Elie Nadelman
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1850
eMuseum Object ID: 
44413
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Whetstone holder

Date: 
1830-1840
Medium: 
Wood, paint
Dimensions: 
Overall: 12 x 3 1/4 x 4 in. ( 30.5 x 8.3 x 10.2 cm )
Description: 
Flat back wooden whetstone holder with red, green, yellow, and blue painted decoration composed of heart, two flowers and concentric circles; two holes for mounting on wall on either side.
Credit Line: 
Purchased from Elie Nadelman, 1937
Object Number: 
INV.755[dup]
Marks: 
painted: on front below opening: "SM"
Inscriptions: 
hand written: collector's label affixed to back: "2651 / Swiss"
Gallery Label: 
This object was once part of the folk art collection of Elie Nadelman (1882-1946), the avant-garde sculptor. From 1924 to 1934, Nadelman's collection was displayed in his Museum of Folk Arts, located in the Riverdale section of the Bronx. The Historical Society purchased Nadelman's entire collection in 1937. Reapers filled these carved wooden flasks with water, strapped them onto their belts and carried them into the fields in order to keep a whetstone moist in the event that they needed to sharpen their scythe. Though prevalent throughout northern Europe, the shape and ornamentation of this oblong cylindrical holder is characteristic of the Swiss type, which often featured carved running ornaments and rosettes or painted hearts, bull's eyes and flowers. The flask, which was alternatively called a Wetzsteinköcher ("whetstone quiver") and a Wetzsteintasche ("whetstone pocket"), featured a tapered point at the base that allowed peasants to stake the quiver upright into the ground when resting from their labors in the fields, thus preventing the water from pouring out of the opening at the top.
Provenance: 
The Folk Art Collection of Elie Nadelman
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1840
eMuseum Object ID: 
39274
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

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Creative: Tronvig Group