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Ladle

Object Number: 
1930.31
Date: 
ca. 1797
Medium: 
Silver
Dimensions: 
Overall: 14 1/2 x 3 3/4 x 2 1/2 in. ( 36.8 x 9.5 x 6.4 cm ) Silver Weight: 5 oz (troy) 18 dwt (184 g)
Marks: 
engraved: on the handle: "JL" in script stamped: on the underside of the handle: "J & T.D" in roman letters in a rectangular surround with pseudo hallmarks of bird's head in a rectangular surround and wheat sheaf in rectangular surround
Description: 
Wrought silver ladle with down-turned pointed handle decorated with bright-cut engraving and script initials "JL"; deep circular bowl has pointed drop at reverse; makers' hallmark and pseudo hallmarks stamped along the underside of handle end.
Gallery Label: 
This Neoclassical ladle was made by the partnership of Joseph and Teunis D. DuBois, brothers of mixed Huguenot and Dutch descent from Monmouth County, New Jersey, who worked together in New York City for a brief period between June 1795 and spring 1797. Teunis's account book documenting his sales to silver retailers between 1797 and 1813 records the sale of four types of ladles: soup (100), butter (20), gravy (8), and punch (2). Given the predominance of soup ladles in his accounting, coupled with the relatively frequent survival of the form shown here, it seems likely that this example was originally intended for soup. The ladle bears the engraved initials of John Lincklaen (1768-1822), who married Helen Ledyard in 1797. Their wedding date corresponds with the brief partnership of the DuBois brothers, suggesting that the ladle may have been presented to the couple as a wedding gift.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Mrs. Charles S. Fairchild
Provenance: 
John Lincklaen (1768-1822), who married Helen Ledyard (1777-1847); to her nephew Lincklaen Ledyard (1820-1864, changed name to Ledyard Lincklaen), who married Helen Clarissa Seymour; to their daughter, Helen Lincklaen (Mrs. Charles S. Fairchild, 1845-1931), the donor.
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.
Creative: Tronvig Group