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John Alsop King (1788-1867)

Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1855
Medium: 
Painted plaster, wood and glass
Dimensions: 
Overall: 22 x 18 in. ( 55.9 x 45.7 cm )
Description: 
Bas-relief portrait
Credit Line: 
Gift of Mrs. Gherardi Davis and Miss Ellen King
Object Number: 
1909.28
Gallery Label: 
John Alsop King was the son of Rufus King (1755-1827) and the brother of Edward King (1795-1836). He entered politics in the 1820s, became a member of the newly formed Republican party in 1856, and was elected governor of New York the following year. This bas-relief portrait of him was a gift to the Society from his granddaughters.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1855
eMuseum Object ID: 
41896
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

John Marshall (1755-1835)

Classification: 
Date: 
1835
Medium: 
Off-white painted and overpainted plaster
Dimensions: 
Overall: 33 3/4 x 23 1/2 x 12 1/2 in. ( 85.7 x 59.7 x 31.8 cm )
Description: 
Portrait bust
Object Number: 
X.53
Marks: 
inscribed: under bust and under base in pencil: "12" inscribed: back of base: "JOHN MARSHALL"
Gallery Label: 
John Marshall was appointed chief justice of the United States Supreme Court in 1801, and he served in that office with great distinction until his death thirty-four years later. In 1834 Frazee was commissioned by the wealthy Boston merchant Thomas H. Perkins to go to Richmond, Virginia, for the purpose of making a portrait bust of Chief Justice Marshall, then approaching his eightieth year. The marble original, now in the Boston Atheneum, was finished in 1835. Frazee made numerous replicas.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1835
eMuseum Object ID: 
41869
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Donald Robert Perry Marquis (1878-1937)

Classification: 
Date: 
1937
Medium: 
White painted plaster
Dimensions: 
Overall: 18 3/4 x 7 1/2 x 6 1/4 in. ( 47.6 x 19 x 15.9 cm )
Description: 
Death mask
Credit Line: 
Gift of Mrs. Adolf Alexander Weinman
Object Number: 
1953.33
Marks: 
inscriptions: back of neck: "DON MARQUIS/1937"
Gallery Label: 
Marquis, author and humorist, was born in Walnut, Illinois, the son of James S. and Virginia (Whitmore) Marquis. He first gained recognition in New York as a newspaper columnist writing for the New York Sun and the New York Tribune. Don Marquis, as he was known, was also the author of plays and short stories, although his more sober and serious efforts were never so successful or popular as his "mehitabel the cat" and "archy the cockroach" columns published in 1927 and 1950.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1937
eMuseum Object ID: 
41868
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

John James Audubon (1785-1851)

Classification: 
Date: 
Pre 1839
Medium: 
Plaster, shellac
Dimensions: 
Overall: 8 1/2 x 5 7/8 x 3 1/2 in. ( 21.6 x 14.9 x 8.9 cm )
Description: 
Life mask.
Credit Line: 
Gift of the Thomas Paine National Historical Association
Object Number: 
1926.56b
Gallery Label: 
The American icon John James Audubon was born in 1785 in Les Cayes (in the French colony of Santo Domingue, today's Haiti). He was the son of Jean Audubon and his French mistress, who died shortly thereafter. In 1788 the youth was sent to France and grew up in Nantes and nearby Couëron and in 1793 was adopted by his father and wealthy stepmother, Anne Moynet. Educated as a country gentleman, he served an unsuccessful stint in the navy with his father. In 1803 he came to the United States to escape conscription into Napoleon's army and ostensibly to supervise his father's property at Mill Grove, Pennsylvania. Already enamored of his adopted country, he preferred studying its wildlife, especially birds, a passion he had developed in France where he began drawing birds and studying them scientifically. After returning to Nantes (1805-06) to obtain permission to marry his neighbor, Lucy Bakewell, he settled in America, searching for a profession and a way to make his mark. The Audubons looked to the promise of the frontier, and he first tried to operate a series of general stores in the Kentucky and elsewhere, but the last proved to be a failure due to the economic panic of 1819. After making a living as a bread-and-butter portrait artist, he obtained a position at the Western Museum in Cincinnati as a naturalist-artist, and soon dedicated himself to his magnum opus, The Birds of America. Engraved by the master printmaker Robert Havell Jr., its 435 double-elephant folios, were published in London in 87 fascicles of five hand-colored engravings with aquatint (1827-38). The Society owns all 435 of Audubon's original watercolors for this spectacular series, as well as one of the less than two hundred original copies printed of The Birds of America bound in five volumes. After spending much of his time in Great Britain (1826-39), Audubon returned to America, and three years later made his home in New York City-in the vicinity of West 157th Street and the Hudson River. He died there at his estate (Minnie's Land) in 1851, and was buried in nearby Trinity Cemetery, where his grave is marked by a Celtic-Runic cross. This impression of Audubon's life mask was taken in 1907 by the donor and his brother, Dr. George Luke Havell, from the original which Robert Havell, Jr. had made in London in 1830 when Audubon was there in connection with the publication of Birds of America. Robert Havell engraved approximately four hundred plates for Birds of America, working on them in England between 1827 and 1838. In 1839 he came to America where he became a landscape artist in the Hudson River Valley. The Society owns several of his landscape sketches. The original life mask, now in the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard University, is illustrated in Herrick, Audubon the Naturalist, 2, 1917, opp. p. 178.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1839
eMuseum Object ID: 
41847
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

James Madison (1751-1836)

Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1816
Medium: 
Red wax and dark blue glass
Dimensions: 
Overall: 3 1/16 x 2 7/8 x 7/16 in. ( 7.8 x 7.3 x 1.1 cm )
Description: 
Bas-relief portrait
Credit Line: 
Gift of the Gallatin family
Object Number: 
1880.6
Marks: 
inscribed: on back in pencil: "Madison"
Gallery Label: 
Valaperta, a native of Italy, was active in Washington, D.C., in 1816-17, and sometime during this period modeled the fine set of little wax profiles of Jefferson, Jackson, Madison, Monroe, and Albert Gallatin now owned by the Society.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1816
eMuseum Object ID: 
41828
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Mrs. James Madison (1731-1829)

Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1816
Medium: 
Red wax, glass, gilding, and pine
Dimensions: 
Overall: 6 5/16 x 6 5/16 x 1 1/4 in. ( 16 x 16 x 3.2 cm )
Description: 
Bas-relief portrait.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Mrs. Mary Madison McGuire
Object Number: 
1939.245
Gallery Label: 
Eleanor "Nelly" Rose Conway, the daughter of Francis and Rebecca (Catlett) Conway, grew up on the family estate at Port Conway in King George County, Virginia. She married James Madison (1723-1801), of Orange County, Virigina, on September 15, 1749. Her first child, James Madison, Jr., would become the fourth president of the United States.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1816
eMuseum Object ID: 
41827
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Ernest Henry Schelling (1876-1939)

Classification: 
Date: 
1940
Medium: 
Brown painted plaster
Dimensions: 
Overall: 18 x 12 x 13 in. ( 45.7 x 30.5 x 33 cm )
Description: 
Portrait bust
Credit Line: 
Gift of the artist
Object Number: 
1951.458
Marks: 
inscribed: in pencil: "1940/c (encircled)" signed: side of proper left shoulder: "MALVINA HOFFMAN"
Gallery Label: 
The subject was born in Belvidere, N.J., the son of Felix Schelling and Rose Busby (White) Schelling. A child prodigy at the piano, he studied with renowned European masters and had a successful concert career until 1917 when he served with the U.S. army in World War I. After the war he devoted considerable time to composing, "A Victory Ball" (1923) being one of his best-known works. The bronze related to this plaster bust is in the foyer of the first tier boxes of Carnegie Hall.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1940
eMuseum Object ID: 
41816
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Silas Sadler Packard (1826-1898)

Classification: 
Date: 
1890
Medium: 
Dark brown patinated bronze
Dimensions: 
Overall: 26 1/2 x 20 1/4 x 11 in. ( 67.3 x 51.4 x 27.9 cm )
Description: 
Portrait bust
Credit Line: 
Gift of the Trustees of Packard Junior College
Object Number: 
1954.128
Marks: 
inscriptions: signed under proper left shoulder: " J.Q.A. Ward/Sculptor 1890" inscribed: proper left back corner of bust: "Cast by the Henry-Bonnard Bronze Co./N.Y. 1890"
Gallery Label: 
Packard, a pioneer in the field of business education, founded a business college in New York in 1858. Packard's Business College was especially successful in training young women for office work; in this respect, Packard was a leader in demonstrating to employers the clerical skills of women, especially in stenography and with the newly invented typewriter.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1890
eMuseum Object ID: 
41808
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Daniel Jerome MacGowan, M.D. (1815-1893)

Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1865
Medium: 
Painted plaster
Dimensions: 
Overall: 28 x 21 1/2 x 13 in. ( 71.1 x 54.6 x 33 cm )
Description: 
Portrait bust.
Credit Line: 
Gift of the artist
Object Number: 
1866.3
Gallery Label: 
This bust was probably modeled in Washington, D.C., where Mills maintained his large studio and foundry. It was executed during one of MacGowan's return visits to the United States from China when he lectured on the problems and the potential of Asia. The bust is one of the last pieces known to have been done by Mills, who had earlier gained fame as the first American to cast an equestrian statue, that of Andrew Jackson.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1865
eMuseum Object ID: 
41788
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

William Thomas Sampson (1840-1902)

Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1902
Medium: 
Painted plaster cast
Dimensions: 
Overall: 11 1/2 x 7 3/8 x 6 1/8 in. ( 29.2 x 18.7 x 15.6 cm )
Description: 
Death mask.
Credit Line: 
Gift of the Naval History Society
Object Number: 
1925.83
Marks: 
label: "Plaster cast of the DEATH MASK of WILLIAM THOMAS SAMPSON (1840-1902) Rear Admiral, U. S. N. Presented to The Naval History Society, 1920-1921 by his daughter, Mrs. Roy Campbell Smith (Margaret Aldrich Sampson)"
Gallery Label: 
The subject was born at Palmyra, New York, the son of James and Hannah (Walker) Sampson. He graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy at the head of his class in 1861 and saw action during the Civil War. Later, in the Spanish-American War, he distinguished himself as commander of the North Atlantic squadron which achieved victory over the Spanish fleet under command of Admiral Cervera. He became a permanent rear admiral in 1899, and from 1899 until his death was commandant of the Boston Navy Yard.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1902
eMuseum Object ID: 
41773
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

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