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INV.103

Classification: 
Medium: 
Metal
Dimensions: 
Overall: 13 x 3 x 1 in. ( 33 x 7.6 x 2.5 cm )
Description: 
Part of a sculpture
Credit Line: 
Gift of Mr. Temple Prime
Object Number: 
INV.103
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
0
eMuseum Object ID: 
2466
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Thomas Hart Benton (1782-1858)

Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1940
Medium: 
Off-white painted plaster
Dimensions: 
Overall: 11 x 8 5/8 x 4 1/2 in. ( 27.9 x 21.9 x 11.4 cm )
Description: 
Life mask
Credit Line: 
Purchase, General Fund
Object Number: 
1946.364
Marks: 
inscribed: on back in pencil: "T. H. Benton" paper label: on back: "Benton mask 20-87"
Gallery Label: 
This cast was part of the Phrenological Museum of Fowler & Wells, which opened in New York City in 1842. Brothers Orson Squire Fowler (1809-1887) and Lorenzo Niles Fowler (1811-1896) and their business associate Samuel Roberts Wells (1820-1875) were noted phrenologists who read heads to understand the subject's "temperament." Their Phrenological Cabinet displaying casts, skulls, and charts became a popular fixture in the city.
Provenance: 
The Fowler Mask Collection
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1940
eMuseum Object ID: 
2465
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Unidentified man, possibly Daniel Webster (1782-1852)

Classification: 
Date: 
Mid-19th century
Medium: 
Painted plaster
Dimensions: 
Overall: 10 x 8 x 3/4 in. ( 25.4 x 20.3 x 1.9 cm )
Description: 
Bas-relief portrait
Object Number: 
INV.15032
Marks: 
signed: on base of relief: "S. Ellis"
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
0
eMuseum Object ID: 
2370
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882)

Classification: 
Date: 
1914
Medium: 
Plaster
Dimensions: 
Overall: 26 1/2 in. ( 67.3 cm )
Description: 
Maquette for life-size marble in the Concord Public Library depicting seated figure intent upon his thoughts, wearing favorite robe (the "Gaberlunzey," as it was affectionately called by the sitter's family).
Credit Line: 
Gift of Mrs. William Penn Cresson (Margaret French)
Object Number: 
1953.14
Provenance: 
Mrs. William Penn Cresson (Margaret French), daughter of the artist -original statue in the Concord Public Library, Concord, MA, 1914
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1914
eMuseum Object ID: 
2161
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Elihu Burritt (1810-1897)

Classification: 
Date: 
Mid-19th century
Medium: 
Painted plaster
Dimensions: 
Overall: 10 x 6 1/4 x 9 1/4 in. ( 25.4 x 15.9 x 23.5 cm )
Description: 
Death mask.
Credit Line: 
Purchase, General Fund
Object Number: 
1946.356
Marks: 
inscribed: on back of neck in crayon: "Burritt" label: on inside: "Burritt head 12 -82"
Gallery Label: 
This cast was part of the Phrenological Museum of Fowler & Wells, which opened in New York City in 1842. Brothers Orson Squire Fowler (1809-1887) and Lorenzo Niles Fowler (1811-1896) and their business associate Samuel Roberts Wells (1820-1875) were noted phrenologists who read heads to understand the subject's "temperament." Their Phrenological Cabinet displaying casts, skulls, and charts became a popular fixture in the city.
Provenance: 
The Fowler Mask Collection
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
0
eMuseum Object ID: 
1954
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Mrs. William Gage Lambert (1797-1875)

Classification: 
Date: 
1848
Medium: 
White marble
Dimensions: 
Overall: 23 1/2 x 19 x 10 1/2 in. ( 59.7 x 48.3 x 26.7 cm )
Description: 
Portrait bust
Credit Line: 
Gift of Mrs. Sally Lambert Richards
Object Number: 
1950.21
Marks: 
signed: back of base: "C. B. Ives/Sculpt,/FLOR./1848"
Gallery Label: 
Sally Perley was the granddaughter of William Perley of Boxford, Massachusetts, who commanded a company from that town at the battles of Lexington and Bunker Hill. In 1820 she was married to William Gage Lambert whose grandfather, Jonathan Lambert, also fought in the Revolutionary War.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1848
eMuseum Object ID: 
1906
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

George Washington (1732-1799)

Classification: 
Date: 
Mid-19th century
Medium: 
Dark brown patinated bronze
Dimensions: 
Overall: 21 1/2 x 11 3/4 x 9 1/2 in. ( 54.6 x 29.8 x 24.1 cm )
Description: 
Portrait bust
Credit Line: 
Gift of Mr. A. Walter Socolow
Object Number: 
1959.29
Marks: 
inscribed: proper right shoulder: "Houdon" inscribed: on top of back: "F. BARBEDIENNE FOUNDEUR"
Gallery Label: 
Barbedienne, who operated one of the leading bronze foundries in Europe in the third quarter of the 19th century, produced numerous replicas after two types of Washington busts by Houdon. The Society's version has the chest draped, and was taken from the terracotta original in the Louvre, which is believed to have been made in 1786, or very soon after Houdon's return to France from the United States.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
0
eMuseum Object ID: 
1487
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

INV.707

Classification: 
Medium: 
Ceramic
Dimensions: 
Overall: 15 x 15 x 8 in. ( 38.1 x 38.1 x 20.3 cm )
Credit Line: 
Gift from an unidentified source
Object Number: 
INV.707
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
0
eMuseum Object ID: 
1275
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

A Frolic At The Old Homestead

Classification: 
Date: 
1887
Medium: 
Painted plaster
Dimensions: 
Overall: 22 x 16 x 14 in. ( 55.9 x 40.6 x 35.6 cm )
Description: 
Genre figure.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Mr. Samuel V. Hoffman
Object Number: 
1929.88
Marks: 
signed: top of base: "JOHN ROGERS/NEW YORK/1887" inscribed: top back of base- obscured by paint: "PATENTED MA 188.." inscribed: front of base: "A FROLIC/AT THE/OLD HOMESTEAD"
Gallery Label: 
As Rogers grew older, he no doubt became aware of the generational distinctions between himself, his aging parents, and his growing children, and some of his later works depict intergenerational dynamics. Here, a venerable woman is at the center of a spirited young people's game in A Frolic at the Old Homestead. Rogers' sales catalogue describes how "The Young Folks are having a game of Blind-Man's-Buff around the old Grandmother's chair." Though the group was released in the spring of 1887, it received a great deal of attention as a Christmas gift later that year. One writer declared, "The scene is eminently suggestive of the good cheer which ought to prevail in every well-regulated home about this holiday time." The scene could easily be interpreted as a family group that has reunited for the holidays. Three young people, informally dressed, are engaged in a boisterous game that circles around the presumed matriarch, who looks over her spectacles with a bemused expression. Not only did Rogers make her the center of the composition, he depicted her safely ensconced in a comfortable chair, warmly wrapped in a shawl and cap, with her feet up on a stool and surrounded by her loving grandchildren. Rogers' career had spanned more than a quarter century, and his audience was growing older as well; one might imagine the grandmother as one of the artist's loyal customers, and he could not have created a more appealing subject than an idealized vision of the members of an extended family coming home, with her as the center of fun-loving attention. Paradoxically, this gentle and innocuous depiction of private life is also an example of a daring turn in the artist's style. His later compositions became more complex and incorporated more figures. Here, a total of four figures are present, and the young people at their game form a complex ballet of poses and gestures around the venerable lady. The young man in the blindfold reaches across her to try and catch the girl on the other side of the chair. She is pulled just out of his reach by another young man who is about to distract the "blind man" with a wave of his handkerchief. The composition shows Rogers at the peak of his technical powers, but this was his last truly popular group.
Bibliography: 
Articles, Scrapbooks of miscellaneous clippings, etc. about John Rogers, Vols. 1, 2, 4, New York Historical Society. Barck, Dorothy, "Rogers Group in the Museum of the New-York Historical Society," New-York Historical Society Quarterly, Vol. XVI, No. 3, October, 1932, p. 76. Wallace, David H., John Rogers, The People's Sculptor, Middleton, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 1967, pp. 114, 178, 255, 294. Smith, Mrs. and Mrs. Chetwood, Rogers Groups: Thought and Wrought by John Rogers, Boston: Charles E. Goodspeed & Co., 1934, pp.94-5. Wallace, David H., "The Art of John Rogers: So Real and So True," American Art Journal, November, 1972, pp. 59-70. Bleier, Paul and Meta, John Rogers Statuary, Atglen, PA: Schiffer Publishing Ltd., 2001, pp. 200-1.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1887
eMuseum Object ID: 
1272
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Playing Doctor

Classification: 
Date: 
1872
Medium: 
Painted plaster
Dimensions: 
Overall: 14 3/4 x 14 3/4 x 11 in. ( 37.5 x 37.5 x 27.9 cm )
Description: 
Genre figure.
Credit Line: 
Purchase
Object Number: 
1932.98
Marks: 
signed: proper left top of base: "JOHN ROGERS/NEW YORK" inscribed: obscured-top back of base: "PATENTED...." inscribed: front base: "PLAYING DOCTOR"
Gallery Label: 
This group represents an amusing scene of child life that Rogers' sales catalogues described in detail: "two children wrapped in their parents' clothes, as mother and doctor, are playing that a younger one is sick, and his mother has wrapped him in a blanket, and soaked his feet, before she called the doctor; but now he has come, with his bottle of medicine, and is examining the patient." The children are irresistible in their oversize garments, and the charm of the scene is enhanced by the earnest expressions of the "mother" and "doctor" as they discuss the bemused "patient." The group was a popular success and became a familiar decoration in doctors' waiting rooms. Rogers did not mention in his sales catalogue that the children were his own: Johnny, age six, Katie age four, and Charlie, two years old. This was the first time that Rogers had used his children as models. In portraying his children enjoying an innocent amusement, Rogers universalized the joys of his own family life, and after this point the sculptor's work took an autobiographical turn. He derived more and more of his subjects from the lives of his family and their neighbors, and he used them as models with growing frequency. For this personal subject, he chose an equally intimate scale; the plaster measures little more than fourteen inches high, in contrast to the approximately twenty-two-inch height of his groups over the past several years. Perhaps in keeping with the humble domesticity of the scene, he also departed from his usual verticality to employ a horizontal composition that conveys a sense of the figures' small size. Though Rogers' sales catalogues did not identify his models, he made certain that newspapers did. Most notices of the new group pointed out that the children were his, adding that this would no doubt add to the sculpture's popularity. By the early 1870s Rogers was a genuine celebrity; given his status as a well-known and beloved artist, his admirers would be interested in a behind-the-scenes glimpse of his personal life and his family, just as the fascination with children of celebrities enjoys renewed popularity in the twenty-first century.
Bibliography: 
Articles, Scrapbooks of miscellaneous clippings, etc. about John Rogers, Vols. 1, 3, 4, New York Historical Society. "The Rogers Statuettes," The Evening Post, New York, Dec. 19, 1872. Barck, Dorothy, "Rogers Group in the Museum of the New-York Historical Society," New-York Historical Society Quarterly, Vol. XVI, No. 3, October, 1932, p. 78. Smith, Mrs. and Mrs. Chetwood, Rogers Groups: Thought and Wrought by John Rogers, Boston: Charles E. Goodspeed & Co., 1934, pp.78-9. Wallace, David H., John Rogers, The People's Sculptor, Middleton, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 1967, pp. 228, 231-2, 294, 304. Bleier, Paul and Meta, John Rogers Statuary, Atglen, PA: Schiffer Publishing Ltd., 2001, pp. 136-7.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1872
eMuseum Object ID: 
1269
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

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