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Pysanka (Ukrainian Easter egg) (one of a set of five)

Classification: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Object name: 
Date: 
20th century
Medium: 
Chicken egg shell, dyes
Dimensions: 
Smallest (egg): 2 1/2 × 1 1/2 × 1 1/2 in. (6.4 × 3.8 × 3.8 cm) Container (small): 2 7/8 × 2 1/4 × 2 1/4 in. (7.3
Place Made: 
Description: 
Credit Line: 
Gift of the Surmach Family
Object Number: 
2017.5.9e
Marks: 
Inscriptions: 
Gallery Label: 

For nearly a century, Surma Books & Music Co. was a cultural hub for New York City’s Ukrainian immigrant centered community in the East Village, also known as Little Ukraine. Until its recent closure, the store had been located at 11 East Seventh Street since 1943.

Myron Surmach Sr., its founder, arrived at Ellis Island from the Ukraine in 1910. He settled in New York City after working various odd jobs in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Joining a Czech gymnastics group prompted him to open his shop in 1918 to sell gym clothing and Ukrainian books. It evolved into a general store, selling phonographs and washing machines, but Surmach also offered services such as letter reading. The business grew to include ethnic music publishing during the 1920s and 1930s—perhaps a fitting occupation, since “surma” also refers to a Ukrainian woodwind instrument.

During the 1950s, the store’s offerings shifted toward the marketing of “folk” through craft items and publications. Surmach’s son, Myron Jr. (1932–2003), assumed the business and began carrying products such as ceramics, religious icons, embroidered shirts, and wooden objects made by the Hutsul highlanders. In addition to selling traditional craft, Surma offered the tools and supplies to practice them, including a large selection embroidery flosses and fabrics, as well as jacquard ribbons with “folk” patterns, albeit made in Germany.

Provenance: 
Bibliography: 
Prior Exhibitions: 
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
2000
eMuseum Object ID: 
83708
Exclude from TMS update: 
3
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Pysanka (Ukrainian Easter egg) (one of a set of five)

Classification: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Object name: 
Date: 
20th century
Medium: 
Chicken egg shell, dyes
Dimensions: 
Smallest (egg): 2 1/2 × 1 1/2 × 1 1/2 in. (6.4 × 3.8 × 3.8 cm) Container (small): 2 7/8 × 2 1/4 × 2 1/4 in. (7.3
Place Made: 
Description: 
Credit Line: 
Gift of the Surmach Family
Object Number: 
2017.5.9d
Marks: 
Inscriptions: 
Gallery Label: 

For nearly a century, Surma Books & Music Co. was a cultural hub for New York City’s Ukrainian immigrant centered community in the East Village, also known as Little Ukraine. Until its recent closure, the store had been located at 11 East Seventh Street since 1943.

Myron Surmach Sr., its founder, arrived at Ellis Island from the Ukraine in 1910. He settled in New York City after working various odd jobs in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Joining a Czech gymnastics group prompted him to open his shop in 1918 to sell gym clothing and Ukrainian books. It evolved into a general store, selling phonographs and washing machines, but Surmach also offered services such as letter reading. The business grew to include ethnic music publishing during the 1920s and 1930s—perhaps a fitting occupation, since “surma” also refers to a Ukrainian woodwind instrument.

During the 1950s, the store’s offerings shifted toward the marketing of “folk” through craft items and publications. Surmach’s son, Myron Jr. (1932–2003), assumed the business and began carrying products such as ceramics, religious icons, embroidered shirts, and wooden objects made by the Hutsul highlanders. In addition to selling traditional craft, Surma offered the tools and supplies to practice them, including a large selection embroidery flosses and fabrics, as well as jacquard ribbons with “folk” patterns, albeit made in Germany.

Provenance: 
Bibliography: 
Prior Exhibitions: 
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
2000
eMuseum Object ID: 
83707
Exclude from TMS update: 
3
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Pysanka (Ukrainian Easter egg) (one of a set of five)

Classification: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Object name: 
Date: 
20th century
Medium: 
Chicken egg shell, dyes
Dimensions: 
Smallest (egg): 2 1/2 × 1 1/2 × 1 1/2 in. (6.4 × 3.8 × 3.8 cm) Container (small): 2 7/8 × 2 1/4 × 2 1/4 in. (7.3
Place Made: 
Description: 
Credit Line: 
Gift of the Surmach Family
Object Number: 
2017.5.9c
Marks: 
Inscriptions: 
Gallery Label: 

For nearly a century, Surma Books & Music Co. was a cultural hub for New York City’s Ukrainian immigrant centered community in the East Village, also known as Little Ukraine. Until its recent closure, the store had been located at 11 East Seventh Street since 1943.

Myron Surmach Sr., its founder, arrived at Ellis Island from the Ukraine in 1910. He settled in New York City after working various odd jobs in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Joining a Czech gymnastics group prompted him to open his shop in 1918 to sell gym clothing and Ukrainian books. It evolved into a general store, selling phonographs and washing machines, but Surmach also offered services such as letter reading. The business grew to include ethnic music publishing during the 1920s and 1930s—perhaps a fitting occupation, since “surma” also refers to a Ukrainian woodwind instrument.

During the 1950s, the store’s offerings shifted toward the marketing of “folk” through craft items and publications. Surmach’s son, Myron Jr. (1932–2003), assumed the business and began carrying products such as ceramics, religious icons, embroidered shirts, and wooden objects made by the Hutsul highlanders. In addition to selling traditional craft, Surma offered the tools and supplies to practice them, including a large selection embroidery flosses and fabrics, as well as jacquard ribbons with “folk” patterns, albeit made in Germany.

Provenance: 
Bibliography: 
Prior Exhibitions: 
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
2000
eMuseum Object ID: 
83706
Exclude from TMS update: 
3
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Pysanka (Ukrainian Easter egg) (one of a set of five)

Classification: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Object name: 
Date: 
20th century
Medium: 
Chicken egg shell, dyes
Dimensions: 
Smallest (egg): 2 1/2 × 1 1/2 × 1 1/2 in. (6.4 × 3.8 × 3.8 cm) Container (small): 2 7/8 × 2 1/4 × 2 1/4 in. (7.3
Place Made: 
Description: 
Credit Line: 
Gift of the Surmach Family
Object Number: 
2017.5.9b
Marks: 
Inscriptions: 
Gallery Label: 

For nearly a century, Surma Books & Music Co. was a cultural hub for New York City’s Ukrainian immigrant centered community in the East Village, also known as Little Ukraine. Until its recent closure, the store had been located at 11 East Seventh Street since 1943.

Myron Surmach Sr., its founder, arrived at Ellis Island from the Ukraine in 1910. He settled in New York City after working various odd jobs in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Joining a Czech gymnastics group prompted him to open his shop in 1918 to sell gym clothing and Ukrainian books. It evolved into a general store, selling phonographs and washing machines, but Surmach also offered services such as letter reading. The business grew to include ethnic music publishing during the 1920s and 1930s—perhaps a fitting occupation, since “surma” also refers to a Ukrainian woodwind instrument.

During the 1950s, the store’s offerings shifted toward the marketing of “folk” through craft items and publications. Surmach’s son, Myron Jr. (1932–2003), assumed the business and began carrying products such as ceramics, religious icons, embroidered shirts, and wooden objects made by the Hutsul highlanders.

Provenance: 
Bibliography: 
Prior Exhibitions: 
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
2000
eMuseum Object ID: 
83705
Exclude from TMS update: 
3
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Pysanka (Ukrainian Easter egg) (one of a set of five)

Classification: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Object name: 
Date: 
20th century
Medium: 
Chicken egg shell, dyes
Dimensions: 
Smallest (egg): 2 1/2 × 1 1/2 × 1 1/2 in. (6.4 × 3.8 × 3.8 cm) Container (small): 2 7/8 × 2 1/4 × 2 1/4 in. (7.3
Place Made: 
Description: 
Credit Line: 
Gift of the Surmach Family
Object Number: 
2017.5.9a
Marks: 
Inscriptions: 
Gallery Label: 

For nearly a century, Surma Books & Music Co. was a cultural hub for New York City’s Ukrainian immigrant centered community in the East Village, also known as Little Ukraine. Until its recent closure, the store had been located at 11 East Seventh Street since 1943.

Myron Surmach Sr., its founder, arrived at Ellis Island from the Ukraine in 1910. He settled in New York City after working various odd jobs in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Joining a Czech gymnastics group prompted him to open his shop in 1918 to sell gym clothing and Ukrainian books. It evolved into a general store, selling phonographs and washing machines, but Surmach also offered services such as letter reading. The business grew to include ethnic music publishing during the 1920s and 1930s—perhaps a fitting occupation, since “surma” also refers to a Ukrainian woodwind instrument.

During the 1950s, the store’s offerings shifted toward the marketing of “folk” through craft items and publications. Surmach’s son, Myron Jr. (1932–2003), assumed the business and began carrying products such as ceramics, religious icons, embroidered shirts, and wooden objects made by the Hutsul highlanders.

Provenance: 
Bibliography: 
Prior Exhibitions: 
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
2000
eMuseum Object ID: 
78752
Exclude from TMS update: 
3
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Pysanka (Ukrainian Easter egg)

Classification: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Object name: 
Date: 
1990-2016
Medium: 
Goose egg shell, dyes
Dimensions: 
Overall (egg): 3 1/4 × 2 × 2 in. (8.3 × 5.1 × 5.1 cm) Container: 4 × 2 3/4 × 2 3/4 in. (10.2 × 7 × 7 cm)
Place Made: 
Description: 
Credit Line: 
Gift of the Surmach Family
Object Number: 
2017.5.8
Marks: 
Inscriptions: 
Gallery Label: 

For nearly a century, Surma Books & Music Co. was a cultural hub for New York City’s Ukrainian immigrant centered community in the East Village, also known as Little Ukraine. Until its recent closure, the store had been located at 11 East Seventh Street since 1943.

Myron Surmach Sr., its founder, arrived at Ellis Island from the Ukraine in 1910. He settled in New York City after working various odd jobs in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Joining a Czech gymnastics group prompted him to open his shop in 1918 to sell gym clothing and Ukrainian books. It evolved into a general store, selling phonographs and washing machines, but Surmach also offered services such as letter reading. The business grew to include ethnic music publishing during the 1920s and 1930s—perhaps a fitting occupation, since “surma” also refers to a Ukrainian woodwind instrument.

During the 1950s, the store’s offerings shifted toward the marketing of “folk” through craft items and publications. Surmach’s son, Myron Jr. (1932–2003), assumed the business and began carrying products such as ceramics, religious icons, embroidered shirts, and wooden objects made by the Hutsul highlanders.

Provenance: 
Bibliography: 
Prior Exhibitions: 
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
2016
eMuseum Object ID: 
78751
Exclude from TMS update: 
3
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Taras Shevchenko (1814–1861) plate

Classification: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Object name: 
Date: 
ca. 1990-2010
Medium: 
Wood
Dimensions: 
Overall: 1 5/8 × 12 5/8 in. (4.1 × 32.1 cm)
Place Made: 
Description: 

Wooden plate with inlaid geometric decoration around lip; painted portrait at center of Taras Shevchenko, body turned to right; inlay materials include wood and beads.

Credit Line: 
Gift of the Surmach Family
Object Number: 
2017.5.4
Marks: 
Retailer label on underside: "THE UKRANIAN SHOP/ SURMA/ 11 EAST 7 ST., (NEAR 3 AVE.) N. Y. 10003" Retailer sticker on underside of lip: "SURMA'S/ UKRANIAN SHOP/ 11 E. 7 ST. - NY 10003/ (212) 477-0729/ $150-"
Inscriptions: 
Gallery Label: 

For nearly a century, Surma Books & Music Co. was a cultural hub for New York City’s Ukrainian immigrant centered community in the East Village, also known as Little Ukraine. Until its closure in 2016, the store had been located at 11 East Seventh Street since 1943.

Myron Surmach Sr., its founder, arrived at Ellis Island from the Ukraine in 1910. He settled in New York City after working various odd jobs in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Joining a Czech gymnastics group prompted him to open his shop in 1918 to sell gym clothing and Ukrainian books. It evolved into a general store, selling phonographs and washing machines, but Surmach also offered services such as letter reading.

During the 1950s, the store’s offerings shifted toward the marketing of “folk” through craft items and publications. Surmach’s son, Myron Jr. (1932–2003), assumed the business and began carrying products such as ceramics, religious icons, embroidered shirts, and wooden objects made by the Hutsul highlanders. They also sold items commemorating Ukrainian national heros, such as the Hutsul plate bearing an intarsia portrait of Taras Shevchenko, a literary figure and activist. (Surma’s street front directly faced Taras Shevchenko Place.)

Provenance: 
Bibliography: 
Prior Exhibitions: 
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
2015
eMuseum Object ID: 
78747
Exclude from TMS update: 
3
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Woodcarving (squirrel)

Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1870
Medium: 
Pine, paint
Dimensions: 
Overall: 3 1/8 x 3 3/8 x 7/8 in. ( 7.9 x 8.6 x 2.2 cm )
Description: 
Carved wooden squirrel on oblong base; gray painted body with black streaks, brown nut clutched below chin, and green base.
Credit Line: 
Purchased from Elie Nadelman
Object Number: 
1937.1111
Gallery Label: 
This object was once part of the folk art collection of Elie Nadelman (1882-1946), the avant-garde sculptor. From 1924 to 1934, Nadelman's collection was displayed in his Museum of Folk Arts, located in the Riverdale section of the Bronx. The Historical Society purchased Nadelman's entire collection in 1937.
Provenance: 
The Folk Art Collection of Elie Nadelman
Bibliography: 
Black, Mary C., "Make believe and make do: American children's toys," Antiques, December 1962, pp. 620-623. Christensen, Erwin O., Early American Wood Carving. Cleveland: World Publishing Company, 1952, pp. 104-105. Christensen, Erwin O., The Index of American Design. New York, Macmillan, 1950, pp. 135-137. Flower, Milton E., "Wilhelm Schimmel and Aaron Mountz wood carvers," [exhibition catalog], Williamsburg, Va. : Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Collection, 1965. Lichten, Frances, Folk Art of Rural Pennsylvania. New York, C. Scribner's sons; London, C. Scribner's sons, ltd., 1946. p. 115. Robacker, Earl F., "Pennsylvania German Wood Carvings," Antiques, June 1946, pp. 369-371.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1870
eMuseum Object ID: 
28936
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Woodcarving (parrot)

Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1870
Medium: 
Pine, paint
Dimensions: 
Overall: 5 1/2 x 2 7/8 x 2 3/8 in. ( 14 x 7.3 x 6 cm )
Description: 
Carved wooden parrot with folded wings and straight, cylindrical legs, on small domed oval base; body painted with spots of green, red and yellow on cream-colored ground; wings with vertical bands of red, yellow, green and black; yellow and red beak, yellow legs, and green base.
Credit Line: 
Purchased from Elie Nadelman
Object Number: 
1937.1116
Gallery Label: 
This object was once part of the folk art collection of Elie Nadelman (1882-1946), the avant-garde sculptor. From 1924 to 1934, Nadelman's collection was displayed in his Museum of Folk Arts, located in the Riverdale section of the Bronx. The Historical Society purchased Nadelman's entire collection in 1937.
Provenance: 
The Folk Art Collection of Elie Nadelman
Bibliography: 
Black, Mary C., "Make believe and make do: American children's toys," Antiques, December 1962, pp. 620-623. Christensen, Erwin O., Early American Wood Carving. Cleveland: World Publishing Company, 1952, pp. 104-105. Christensen, Erwin O., The Index of American Design. New York, Macmillan, 1950, pp. 135-137. Flower, Milton E., "Wilhelm Schimmel and Aaron Mountz wood carvers," [exhibition catalog], Williamsburg, Va. : Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Collection, 1965. Lichten, Frances, Folk Art of Rural Pennsylvania. New York, C. Scribner's sons; London, C. Scribner's sons, ltd., 1946. p. 115. Robacker, Earl F., "Pennsylvania German Wood Carvings," Antiques, June 1946, pp. 369-371.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1870
eMuseum Object ID: 
28647
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Woodcarving (lion)

Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1870
Medium: 
Pine, paint
Dimensions: 
Overall: 3 5/8 x 4 5/8 x 1 1/8 in. ( 9.2 x 11.7 x 2.9 cm )
Description: 
Carved wooden lion on low, oblong base; yellow painted body with red highlights; dark green painted base.
Credit Line: 
Purchased from Elie Nadelman
Object Number: 
1937.1114
Gallery Label: 
This object was once part of the folk art collection of Elie Nadelman (1882-1946), the avant-garde sculptor. From 1924 to 1934, Nadelman's collection was displayed in his Museum of Folk Arts, located in the Riverdale section of the Bronx. The Historical Society purchased Nadelman's entire collection in 1937.
Provenance: 
The Folk Art Collection of Elie Nadelman
Bibliography: 
Black, Mary C., "Make believe and make do: American children's toys," Antiques, December 1962, pp. 620-623. Christensen, Erwin O., Early American Wood Carving. Cleveland: World Publishing Company, 1952, pp. 104-105. Christensen, Erwin O., The Index of American Design. New York, Macmillan, 1950, pp. 135-137. Flower, Milton E., "Wilhelm Schimmel and Aaron Mountz wood carvers," [exhibition catalog], Williamsburg, Va. : Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Collection, 1965. Lichten, Frances, Folk Art of Rural Pennsylvania. New York, C. Scribner's sons; London, C. Scribner's sons, ltd., 1946. p. 115. Robacker, Earl F., "Pennsylvania German Wood Carvings," Antiques, June 1946, pp. 369-371.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1870
eMuseum Object ID: 
28646
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

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Creative: Tronvig Group