Moulding Plane

Classification: 
Date: 
1850-1900
Medium: 
Wood, iron
Dimensions: 
Overall: 5 3/4 x 1 3/4 in. ( 14.6 x 4.4 cm )
Description: 
Wooden molding plane composed of a rectangular stock with a concave sole perforated by two slits through which convex blades are inserted at downward angles and tightened by wooden wedges.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Mr. Abraham Hatfield
Object Number: 
1941.446f
Marks: 
impressed: side of stock: "JSS"
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1900
eMuseum Object ID: 
38687
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Moulding Plane

Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1850-1900
Medium: 
Wood, iron
Dimensions: 
Overall: 5 3/4 x 9 1/2 x 1 1/2 in. ( 14.6 x 24.1 x 3.8 cm )
Description: 
Wooden molding plane composed of a rectangular stock with a fluted sole perforated by a central slit through which an iron blade, that conforms to the shape of the sole, is inserted at a downward angle and tightened with a wooden edge.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Abraham Hatfield
Object Number: 
1941.446b
Marks: 
impressed: on front of stock: "UNION FACTORY/WARRANTED/CHAPIN-STEPHENS CO." and "HAMMACHER-SCHLEMMER & CO./NEW YORK"
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1900
eMuseum Object ID: 
38686
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Moulding Plane

Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1850-1900
Medium: 
Wood, iron
Dimensions: 
Overall: 6 x 9 1/2 x 1 1/2 in. ( 15.2 x 24.1 x 3.8 cm )
Description: 
Wooden roundplane composed of a rectangular stock with a convex sole perforated by a central slit through which a convex blade is inserted at a downward angle and tightened with a wooden wedge.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Mr. Abraham Hatfield
Object Number: 
1941.446e
Marks: 
impressed: on front of stock: "H. CHAPIN" and "HAMMACHER SCHLEMMER & CO/ NEW YORK"
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1900
eMuseum Object ID: 
39385
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Moulding Plane

Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1850-1900
Medium: 
Wood, iron
Dimensions: 
Overall: 6 1/2 x 9 1/2 x 3 in. ( 16.5 x 24.1 x 7.6 cm )
Description: 
Wooden molding plane composed of a rectangular stock with a fluted sole perforated by a central slit through which an iron blade, that conforms to the shape of the sole, is inserted at a downward angle and tightened with a wooden edge.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Abraham Hatfield
Object Number: 
1941.446c
Marks: 
impressed: on front of stock: "SM" and illegible mark impressed: on blade: illegible mark
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1900
eMuseum Object ID: 
12952
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Moulding Plane

Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1850-1900
Medium: 
Wood, iron
Dimensions: 
Overall: 6 1/2 x 9 3/4 x 2 1/4 in. ( 16.5 x 24.8 x 5.7 cm )
Description: 
Wooden molding plane composed of a recatngular stock with a fluted sole perforated by a central slit through which an iron blade, that conforms to the shape of the sole is inserted at a downward angle and tightened with a wooden wedge.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Mr. Abraham Hatfield
Object Number: 
1941.446d
Marks: 
impressed: back of stock: "118" and "5/8"
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1900
eMuseum Object ID: 
12951
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Set illustrating the process of raising a silver cup

Classification: 
Date: 
2012
Medium: 
Aluminum
Dimensions: 
Overall (Stacked set): 3 1/8 x 6 in. (7.9 x 15.2 cm)
Description: 

Protoype/stackable set of seven aluminum pieces, most with noticeable hammer marks: (a) disc, illustrating step 1; (b-d) three plates, steps 2-4; (e-f) two silver bowls, steps 5-6; (g) silver cup, step 7.

Credit Line: 
Gift of Bernard Bernstein
Object Number: 
2012.23.5a-g
Gallery Label: 
Silversmith Bernard Berstein made this set as a teaching aid for helping students and museum visitors understand the process of raising a silver cup from a disc of silver.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
2012
eMuseum Object ID: 
69036
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Flat graver

Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1900
Medium: 
Wood, steel and iron
Dimensions: 
Overall: 3 7/8 x 1 7/8 in. (9.8 x 4.8 cm)
Credit Line: 
Gift of Bernard Bernstein
Object Number: 
2012.23.4
Marks: 
Top of knob handle marked "FLAT" by the donor
Gallery Label: 
Adalbert Emil Herrman Nordbrock was a New York City silversmith active during the first half of the twentieth century. Nordbrock was born in Germany and immigrated to the United States in 1885. He settled in the New York area and lived there and in New Jersey during his lifetime. As evidenced by a copy of a surviving certificate (location of original unknown), Nordbrock completed a five-year apprenticeship with Tiffany & Co. at the firm's Prince Street Factory in June 1893. Six years later he married Johanna Fischer (1880-before 1940), also a German immigrant. The couple settled initially in the Bronx and then relocated to Newark, New Jersey, where they lived with Johanna Fischer's family. With Manhattan's silver industry in decline and Newark's on the rise, it is possible that the move was motivated by the availability of work. Nordbrock's stakes and graver are illustrative of a selection of finishing processes used by silversmiths. The early twentieth-century tools are being offered by New York silversmith Bernard Bernstein. Bernstein purchased them from Nordbrock's grandson, John Carcano (b. 1933-?), in about 1997 and used them for his own silversmithing work. Bernstein believes that Nordbrock, following the age-old tradition of artisans making any tools needed for specific processes or those otherwise unavailable, may have made these tools as part of his silversmith training.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1905
eMuseum Object ID: 
69035
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Partial creamer

Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1900
Medium: 
Copper
Dimensions: 
Overall: 3 1/8 x 3 1/2 x 2 1/2 in. (7.9 x 8.9 x 6.4 cm)
Credit Line: 
Gift of Bernard Bernstein
Object Number: 
2012.23.3
Gallery Label: 
Adalbert Emil Herrman Nordbrock was a New York City silversmith active during the first half of the twentieth century. Nordbrock was born in Germany and immigrated to the United States in 1885. He settled in the New York area and lived there and in New Jersey during his lifetime. As evidenced by a copy of a surviving certificate (location of original unknown), Nordbrock completed a five-year apprenticeship with Tiffany & Co. at the firm's Prince Street Factory in June 1893. Six years later he married Johanna Fischer (1880-before 1940), also a German immigrant. The couple settled initially in the Bronx and then relocated to Newark, New Jersey, where they lived with Johanna Fischer's family. With Manhattan's silver industry in decline and Newark's on the rise, it is possible that the move was motivated by the availability of work. The partial creamer illustrates construction techniques and also may have been an underbody part used in silver-plating. The early twentieth-century tools are being offered by New York silversmith Bernard Bernstein. Bernstein purchased them from Nordbrock's grandson, John Carcano (b. 1933-?), in about 1997 and used them for his own silversmithing work. Bernstein believes that Nordbrock, following the age-old tradition of artisans making any tools needed for specific processes or those otherwise unavailable, may have made these tools as part of his silversmith training.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1905
eMuseum Object ID: 
69034
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Silversmith's stake

Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1900
Medium: 
Iron
Dimensions: 
Overall: 9 x 1 1/8 x 1 3/4 in. (22.9 x 2.9 x 4.4 cm)
Credit Line: 
Gift of Bernard Bernstein
Object Number: 
2012.23.2
Gallery Label: 
Adalbert Emil Herrman Nordbrock was a New York City silversmith active during the first half of the twentieth century. Nordbrock was born in Germany and immigrated to the United States in 1885. He settled in the New York area and lived there and in New Jersey during his lifetime. As evidenced by a copy of a surviving certificate (location of original unknown), Nordbrock completed a five-year apprenticeship with Tiffany & Co. at the firm's Prince Street Factory in June 1893. Six years later he married Johanna Fischer (1880-before 1940), also a German immigrant. The couple settled initially in the Bronx and then relocated to Newark, New Jersey, where they lived with Johanna Fischer's family. With Manhattan's silver industry in decline and Newark's on the rise, it is possible that the move was motivated by the availability of work. Nordbrock's stakes and graver are illustrative of a selection of finishing processes used by silversmiths. The partial creamer illustrates construction techniques and also may have been an underbody part used in silver-plating. The early twentieth-century tools are being offered by New York silversmith Bernard Bernstein. Bernstein purchased them from Nordbrock's grandson, John Carcano (b. 1933-?), in about 1997 and used them for his own silversmithing work. Bernstein believes that Nordbrock, following the age-old tradition of artisans making any tools needed for specific processes or those otherwise unavailable, may have made these tools as part of his silversmith training.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1905
eMuseum Object ID: 
69033
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Silversmith's form/stake

Classification: 
Date: 
early 20th Century
Medium: 
Wood (probably maple)
Dimensions: 
Overall: 2 3/8 x 7 1/8 x 2 1/8 in. (6 x 18.1 x 5.4 cm)
Description: 

Silversmith's form (or stake)

Credit Line: 
Gift of Bernard Bernstein
Object Number: 
2012.23.1
Gallery Label: 
Adalbert Emil Herrman Nordbrock was a New York City silversmith active during the first half of the twentieth century. Nordbrock was born in Germany and immigrated to the United States in 1885. He settled in the New York area and lived there and in New Jersey during his lifetime. As evidenced by a copy of a surviving certificate (location of original unknown), Nordbrock completed a five-year apprenticeship with Tiffany & Co. at the firm's Prince Street Factory in June 1893. Six years later he married Johanna Fischer (1880-before 1940), also a German immigrant. The couple settled initially in the Bronx and then relocated to Newark, New Jersey, where they lived with Johanna Fischer's family. With Manhattan's silver industry in decline and Newark's on the rise, it is possible that the move was motivated by the availability of work. Nordbrock's stakes and graver are illustrative of a selection of finishing processes used by silversmiths. The early twentieth-century tools are being offered by New York silversmith Bernard Bernstein. Bernstein purchased them from Nordbrock's grandson, John Carcano (b. 1933-?), in about 1997 and used them for his own silversmithing work. Bernstein believes that Nordbrock, following the age-old tradition of artisans making any tools needed for specific processes or those otherwise unavailable, may have made these tools as part of his silversmith training.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1950
eMuseum Object ID: 
69032
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

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Creative: Tronvig Group