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Crocheted suit

Classification: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Object name: 
Date: 
2016
Medium: 
Acrylic
Dimensions: 
Overall: 69 × 37 in. (175.3 × 94 cm)
Place Made: 
Description: 
Credit Line: 
Gift of Olek
Object Number: 
2017.57
Marks: 
Inscriptions: 
Gallery Label: 
Provenance: 
Bibliography: 
Prior Exhibitions: 
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
2016
eMuseum Object ID: 
79216
Exclude from TMS update: 
3
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

William J. millinery label

Classification: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Object name: 
Date: 
Medium: 
Grosgrain
Dimensions: 
Overall: 2 1/2 × 6 7/8 in. (6.4 × 17.5 cm)
Place Made: 
Description: 

Label made of wide grosgrain ribbon with silk-screened “William J” in hand-written font on front.

Credit Line: 
Purchase, Coaching Club Acquisition Fund
Object Number: 
2017.63.2
Marks: 
Inscriptions: 
Gallery Label: 
Provenance: 
Bibliography: 
Prior Exhibitions: 
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
0
eMuseum Object ID: 
82934
Exclude from TMS update: 
3
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Crescent Cord sample card

Classification: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Object name: 
Date: 
ca. 1915
Medium: 
Dimensions: 
Overall: 4 5/8 × 10 3/8 in. (11.8 × 26.4 cm)
Place Made: 
Description: 

Sample card with thirty-two samples of twine.

Credit Line: 
American Textile History Museum Collection
Object Number: 
2017.62.2
Marks: 
Inscriptions: 
Gallery Label: 
Provenance: 
Bibliography: 
Prior Exhibitions: 
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1920
eMuseum Object ID: 
83851
Exclude from TMS update: 
3
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Service flag needlework panel

Classification: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Object name: 
Date: 
ca. 1942-1945
Medium: 
Cotton, other fiber (possibly rayon)
Dimensions: 
Overall: 11 × 12 3/4 × 1/8 in. (27.9 × 32.4 × 0.3 cm)
Place Made: 
Description: 

Square needlework panel composed of pompom-like circles that are cut yarn bundles; panel illustrates American flag and service flag below, all on black ground; service flag has one blue star against white background with red border; blue star is an embroidered applique; flag is on orange flagpole and has 48 “stars” and 13 red and white stripes; off-white fringe around entire panel.

Credit Line: 
Gift of Arnold and Dora Stern
Object Number: 
2017.53.2
Marks: 
Inscriptions: 
Gallery Label: 

Families, businesses, and organizations hang service flags in their windows to indicate the number of their members serving in the military during wartime. The banners were first designed in 1917 by US Army Captain Robert L. Queissner, an Ohioan with two sons serving in World War I, and the idea spread rapidly. The practice increased during World War II, with many families making theirs by hand. A blue star represents a living individual; these may be covered with silver stars to represent those been wounded or captured, or with gold for those who have been killed.

Provenance: 
Bibliography: 
Prior Exhibitions: 
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1947
eMuseum Object ID: 
80054
Exclude from TMS update: 
3
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Beaded pincushion

Classification: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Object name: 
Date: 
1890-1910
Medium: 
Cotton, glass beads, linen, paper, metal paillettes, plant material
Dimensions: 
Overall: 14 × 9 1/2 × 3 in. (35.6 × 24.1 × 7.6 cm)
Place Made: 
Description: 

Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) raised beadwork pincushion or pillow in trilobe heart shape; beaded panel on front has tan-colored velveteen ground edged by narrow twill tape; front depicts American eagle with an American flag behind each wing and three branches held by its feet; seven “stars” above its head; long sides of panel has border with scallop motif; top of panel has leaves in red, white, green, blue, and orange; edge of entire cushion has bead embroidered band and five beaded tassels in pink, green, and yellow; light blue twisted beaded hanger at top; cushion likely stuffed with sawdust; backing is purple glazed cotton.

Credit Line: 
Gift of Arnold and Dora Stern
Object Number: 
2017.53.1
Marks: 
Inscriptions: 
Gallery Label: 

From the early nineteenth century and into the twentieth, Niagara Falls became a destination for tourists who sought to encounter not only the spectacle of the majestic falls, but the Native Americans they associated with the region. The Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) merged traditional styles of beadwork with Victorian tastes to create a souvenir market for “Indian curiosities,” enabling their beadworkers to earn income through a cottage industry.

During the last quarter of the nineteenth century, the Tuscarora and Mohawk developed a style of raised beadwork sewn in parallel lines, visible in this example. Women worked their motifs over paper patterns that remained intact when finished, embellishing purses, hanging pincushions, daguerreotype frames, and “whimsey” forms such as boots, hearts, horseshoes, and strawberries. Birds are a commonly found motif in Haudenosaunee beadwork.

Provenance: 
Bibliography: 
Prior Exhibitions: 
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1910
eMuseum Object ID: 
80053
Exclude from TMS update: 
3
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Rainbow flag

Classification: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Object name: 
Date: 
ca. 2015
Medium: 
Synthetic fabric, rope, brass, metal
Dimensions: 
Overall: 8 ft. × 12 ft. 6 in. (243.8 cm × 3 m 81 cm)
Place Made: 
Description: 

Synthetic rectangular Rainbow flag (gay pride flag) with red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and purple horizontal stripes, machine-sewn; all four sides finished with white stitching; white rope, looped at either end, sewn into white header, with metal guards protecting and strengthening each loop; one brass grommet in middle of header with metal carabiner clip attached.

Credit Line: 
Gift of Brown Brothers Harriman & Co.
Object Number: 
2017.20
Marks: 
Inscriptions: 
Gallery Label: 

This flag was raised by Brown Brothers Harriman & Co. on the flagpole in front of the firm's 140 Broadway headquarters on June 26, 2015, within 15 minutes of the Supreme Court ruling allowing same-sex marriage.

Provenance: 
Bibliography: 
Prior Exhibitions: 
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
2020
eMuseum Object ID: 
76466
Exclude from TMS update: 
3
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

We the People (New-York Historical Society version)

Classification: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Object name: 
Date: 
2017
Medium: 
Shoelaces
Dimensions: 
Place Made: 
Description: 
Credit Line: 
Gift of Diana and Joe DiMenna
Object Number: 
2017.18
Marks: 
Inscriptions: 
Gallery Label: 

Created entirely from shoelaces donated by museum visitors and New York City students, Nari Ward’s We the People interrogates the first three words of the Constitution’s Preamble. At different moments in American history, those three words—"We the People"—have proven unstable in meaning. Ward urges his viewers to consider which people it defends. By scaling this iconic text to a monumental size, the work is simultaneously legible and ambiguous, depending on the viewer’s physical proximity to the piece.

Provenance: 
Bibliography: 
Prior Exhibitions: 
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
2017
eMuseum Object ID: 
79403
Exclude from TMS update: 
3
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Ribbon swatches (11)

Classification: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Object name: 
Date: 
20th century
Medium: 
Cotton, synthetic
Dimensions: 
Smallest: 6 1/4 × 1 1/8 in. (15.9 × 2.9 cm) Largest: 10 1/2 × 3 5/8 in. (26.7 × 9.2 cm)
Place Made: 
Description: 
Credit Line: 
Gift of the Surmach Family
Object Number: 
2017.5.11a-k
Marks: 
Inscriptions: 
Gallery Label: 

For nearly a century, Surma Books & Music Co. was a cultural hub for New York City’s Ukrainian immigrant centered community in the East Village, also known as Little Ukraine. Until its recent closure, the store had been located at 11 East Seventh Street since 1943.

Myron Surmach Sr., its founder, arrived at Ellis Island from the Ukraine in 1910. He settled in New York City after working various odd jobs in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Joining a Czech gymnastics group prompted him to open his shop in 1918 to sell gym clothing and Ukrainian books. It evolved into a general store, selling phonographs and washing machines, but Surmach also offered services such as letter reading. The business grew to include ethnic music publishing during the 1920s and 1930s—perhaps a fitting occupation, since “surma” also refers to a Ukrainian woodwind instrument.

During the 1950s, the store’s offerings shifted toward the marketing of “folk” through craft items and publications. Surmach’s son, Myron Jr. (1932–2003), assumed the business and began carrying products such as ceramics, religious icons, embroidered shirts, and wooden objects made by the Hutsul highlanders. In addition to selling traditional craft, Surma offered the tools and supplies to practice them, including a large selection embroidery flosses and fabrics, as well as jacquard ribbons with “folk” patterns, albeit made in Germany.

Provenance: 
Bibliography: 
Prior Exhibitions: 
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
2000
eMuseum Object ID: 
78754
Exclude from TMS update: 
3
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Embroidery floss sample card (one of a set of five)

Classification: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Object name: 
Date: 
1960s
Medium: 
Cardboard, cotton
Dimensions: 
Smallest: 8 3/4 × 5 1/2 in. (22.2 × 14 cm) Largest: 9 1/8 × 6 in. (23.2 × 15.2 cm)
Place Made: 
Description: 
Credit Line: 
Gift of the Surmach Family
Object Number: 
2017.5.6e
Marks: 
Inscriptions: 
Gallery Label: 

For nearly a century, Surma Books & Music Co. was a cultural hub for New York City’s Ukrainian immigrant centered community in the East Village, also known as Little Ukraine. Until its closure in 2016, the store had been located at 11 East Seventh Street since 1943.

Myron Surmach Sr., its founder, arrived at Ellis Island from the Ukraine in 1910. He settled in New York City after working various odd jobs in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Joining a Czech gymnastics group prompted him to open his shop in 1918 to sell gym clothing and Ukrainian books. It evolved into a general store, selling phonographs and washing machines, but Surmach also offered services such as letter reading. The business grew to include ethnic music publishing during the 1920s and 1930s.

During the 1950s, the store’s offerings shifted toward the marketing of “folk” through craft items and publications. In addition to selling traditional craft, Surma offered the tools and supplies to practice them, including a large selection embroidery flosses and fabrics, as well as jacquard ribbons with “folk” patterns, albeit made in Germany.

Provenance: 
Bibliography: 
Prior Exhibitions: 
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1969
eMuseum Object ID: 
83703
Exclude from TMS update: 
3
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Embroidery floss sample card (one of a set of five)

Classification: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Object name: 
Date: 
1960s
Medium: 
Cardboard, cotton
Dimensions: 
Smallest: 8 3/4 × 5 1/2 in. (22.2 × 14 cm) Largest: 9 1/8 × 6 in. (23.2 × 15.2 cm)
Place Made: 
Description: 
Credit Line: 
Gift of the Surmach Family
Object Number: 
2017.5.6d
Marks: 
Inscriptions: 
Gallery Label: 

For nearly a century, Surma Books & Music Co. was a cultural hub for New York City’s Ukrainian immigrant centered community in the East Village, also known as Little Ukraine. Until its closure in 2016, the store had been located at 11 East Seventh Street since 1943.

Myron Surmach Sr., its founder, arrived at Ellis Island from the Ukraine in 1910. He settled in New York City after working various odd jobs in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Joining a Czech gymnastics group prompted him to open his shop in 1918 to sell gym clothing and Ukrainian books. It evolved into a general store, selling phonographs and washing machines, but Surmach also offered services such as letter reading. The business grew to include ethnic music publishing during the 1920s and 1930s.

During the 1950s, the store’s offerings shifted toward the marketing of “folk” through craft items and publications. In addition to selling traditional craft, Surma offered the tools and supplies to practice them, including a large selection embroidery flosses and fabrics, as well as jacquard ribbons with “folk” patterns, albeit made in Germany.

Provenance: 
Bibliography: 
Prior Exhibitions: 
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1969
eMuseum Object ID: 
83702
Exclude from TMS update: 
3
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

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Creative: Tronvig Group