Update

Visitors ages 12 and older are required to show proof of vaccination against COVID-19. Learn more >

Soup tureen

Classification: 
Medium: 
Silver
Credit Line: 
Gift of Barbara Tetzlaff, Muriel Talbot French Trust
Object Number: 
2011.13.1
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
0
eMuseum Object ID: 
67752
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Presentation bowl

Classification: 
Date: 
1858
Medium: 
Silver
Dimensions: 
Overall: 8 1/2 x 9 5/8 x 9 5/8 in. (21.6 x 24.4 x 24.4 cm)
Description: 
Circular, sterling silver bowl-on-stand decorated with repousse chased flowers and foliage. Wide circular bowl has flared repousse chased and scalloped rim trimmed with applied band of strigillation; flared, circular, repousse chased stand trimmed at top with beaded band and finished at foot with similar applied band of strigilliation; bowl interior is gilded. Bowl is engraved at center-front: "To A. L. Anderson. / as a mark of respect and regard / from the frequent Passengers of the / Steamboat Thomas Powell / 1858."
Credit Line: 
Gift of Patricia Hecker
Object Number: 
2011.8
Marks: 
Underside of bowl is stamped: "TIFFANY & CO. / 4488 / G & W / ENGLISH STERLING / 925-1000 / 1 / 550 BROADWAY. N. Y."
Gallery Label: 
This bowl-on-stand was presented to Hudson River Day Line captain Absalom L. Anderson (1812-1895), commander of the paddle steamer "Thomas Powell," in 1858. Although the precise reason for the presentation is not known, the gift may have been related to a June 1858 accident that occurred when the steamship struck an oncoming skiff and killed one of the smaller boat's passengers. As captain of the steamship, Anderson was greatly upset by the accident and the death it caused. So great was his sorrow, but also his reputation (even despite the accident), Anderson was presented with a set of silver in an attempt to heal his discouragement. It is possible, therefore, that this bowl-on-stand was part of that service.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1858
eMuseum Object ID: 
67198
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Teaspoon

Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1830
Medium: 
Silver
Dimensions: 
Overall: 6 x 1 1/4 x 1/4 in. (15.2 x 3.2 x 0.6 cm)
Description: 
Silver teaspoon with down turned fiddle handle with basket decoration on the front and "BC" engraved in bright cut script, straight shoulders and pointed oval bowl with rounded drop and shell decoration.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Mr. Marshall Blankarn
Object Number: 
1981.21j
Date Begin: 
1830
Date End: 
1830
eMuseum Object ID: 
66641
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Hanukkah lamp

Classification: 
Date: 
1999
Medium: 
Silver
Dimensions: 
Overall: 6 1/8 x 15 1/2 x 2 3/4 in. (15.6 x 39.4 x 7 cm) Silver Weight: 16.6 dwt (25.8 g)
Description: 
Contemporary candelabra of nine candleholders (eight in front, one at back) secured along base constructed from sterling rectangular rod, sterling discs, and cast sterling sleeves, in form of gate of Gothic-style arches; each individual wax tray and candleholder secured to candlestick with brass screw; each arch element also secured to base with brass screws.
Credit Line: 
Purchase
Object Number: 
2010.19
Gallery Label: 
Hanukkah lamps, or Hannukiot, are candelabra characterized by nine candle branches and used in the ritual candle-lighting associated with the celebration of Hanukkah. This Hanukkah lamp was made in 1999 by New York City silversmith Bernard Bernstein in his Bronx, New York workshop. The design of Bernstein's contemporary Hanukkah lamp was drawn from a variety of inspirations, including his echoing of the pattern of early Gothic iron gates with pointed arches, such as one found at the Altneuschul built in Prague around 1270. To achieve the curvature of the lamp's arches, Bernstein manipulated a bronze working model and constructed pattern jigs to aid in creating the precise bend of each candle holder arch and wax tray. As his work log indicates, the fashioning of this Hanukkah lamp required more than 270 hours of labor.
Provenance: 
Purchased from the artist.
Date Begin: 
1999
Date End: 
1999
eMuseum Object ID: 
66271
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Spoon

Classification: 
Medium: 
Silver
Credit Line: 
Gift of Roberta Gratz
Object Number: 
2009.28.352
Gallery Label: 
This spoon is part of a collection of 407 New York-themed spoons donated by journalist and urban critic Roberta Brandes Gratz in 2009. During the 1880s, American travelers began collecting spoons in earnest as souvenirs of European cities. Anticipating a demand for American souvenir flatware, a few savvy U.S. manufacturers began patenting designs around 1889. New York City subjects appeared on spoons almost immediately. Gorham became the first major factory to produce New York City spoons, joining the craze in 1891. By 1893, Tiffany & Co. offered eighteen different souvenir spoons featuring New York City landmarks at prices ranging from $2 to $5.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
0
eMuseum Object ID: 
66257
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Spoon

Classification: 
Medium: 
Silver
Credit Line: 
Gift of Roberta Gratz
Object Number: 
2009.28.351
Gallery Label: 
This spoon is part of a collection of 407 New York-themed spoons donated by journalist and urban critic Roberta Brandes Gratz in 2009. During the 1880s, American travelers began collecting spoons in earnest as souvenirs of European cities. Anticipating a demand for American souvenir flatware, a few savvy U.S. manufacturers began patenting designs around 1889. New York City subjects appeared on spoons almost immediately. Gorham became the first major factory to produce New York City spoons, joining the craze in 1891. By 1893, Tiffany & Co. offered eighteen different souvenir spoons featuring New York City landmarks at prices ranging from $2 to $5.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
0
eMuseum Object ID: 
66256
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Spoon

Classification: 
Date: 
1891
Medium: 
Silver
Dimensions: 
Overall: 5 1/2 x 1 1/8 x 5/8 in. (14 x 2.9 x 1.6 cm)
Description: 
Sterling silver souvenir spoon; on obverse of handle, New York City skyline labeled “NEW YORK FROM NORTH RIVER”; on bowl, view of the “BROOKLYN BRIDGE”; on reverse, from finial to bowl, views of the “STATUE OF LIBERTY”, “GRANT’S TOMB”, and “FLAT IRON BLDG.”; all in relief; illegible name engraved on reverse of bowl.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Roberta Gratz
Object Number: 
2009.28.350
Gallery Label: 
This spoon is part of a collection of 407 New York-themed spoons donated by journalist and urban critic Roberta Brandes Gratz in 2009. During the 1880s, American travelers began collecting spoons in earnest as souvenirs of European cities. Anticipating a demand for American souvenir flatware, a few savvy U.S. manufacturers began patenting designs around 1889. New York City subjects appeared on spoons almost immediately. Gorham became the first major factory to produce New York City spoons, joining the craze in 1891. By 1893, Tiffany & Co. offered eighteen different souvenir spoons featuring New York City landmarks at prices ranging from $2 to $5.
Date Begin: 
1891
Date End: 
1891
eMuseum Object ID: 
66255
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Spoon

Classification: 
Date: 
1939
Medium: 
Silver
Dimensions: 
Overall: 6 x 1 1/4 x 3/4 in. (15.2 x 3.2 x 1.9 cm)
Description: 
Silver souvenir spoon; on obverse of handle, from finial to bowl, “1939”, view of Trylon and Perisphere with the words, “THEME BUILDING”, and “NEW YORK WORLD’S FAIR”; on bowl, building and surrounding landscape labeled “ADMINISTRATION / BUILDING”; reverse plain.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Roberta Gratz
Object Number: 
2009.28.349
Gallery Label: 
This spoon is part of a collection of 407 New York-themed spoons donated by journalist and urban critic Roberta Brandes Gratz in 2009. During the 1880s, American travelers began collecting spoons in earnest as souvenirs of European cities. Anticipating a demand for American souvenir flatware, a few savvy U.S. manufacturers began patenting designs around 1889. New York City subjects appeared on spoons almost immediately. Gorham became the first major factory to produce New York City spoons, joining the craze in 1891. By 1893, Tiffany & Co. offered eighteen different souvenir spoons featuring New York City landmarks at prices ranging from $2 to $5.
Date Begin: 
1939
Date End: 
1939
eMuseum Object ID: 
66254
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Spoon

Classification: 
Date: 
1913-ca. 1920
Medium: 
Silver
Dimensions: 
Overall: 5 1/8 x 1 x 5/8 in. (13 x 2.5 x 1.6 cm)
Description: 
Sterling silver souvenir spoon; on obverse of handle, from finial to bowl, view of the “BROOKLYN BRIDGE.”, “STATUE OF LIBERTY.”, “FLAT IRON BLDNG.”, and “OBELISK.”; on bowl, view of 2 subway trains and “SUBWAY. / NEW YORK.”; on reverse, from finial to bowl, views of “GRANTS TOMB.” and “TIMES BLDNG.”, and the words, “NEW YORK.”; all in relief.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Roberta Gratz
Object Number: 
2009.28.348
Gallery Label: 
This spoon is part of a collection of 407 New York-themed spoons donated by journalist and urban critic Roberta Brandes Gratz in 2009. During the 1880s, American travelers began collecting spoons in earnest as souvenirs of European cities. Anticipating a demand for American souvenir flatware, a few savvy U.S. manufacturers began patenting designs around 1889. New York City subjects appeared on spoons almost immediately. Gorham became the first major factory to produce New York City spoons, joining the craze in 1891. By 1893, Tiffany & Co. offered eighteen different souvenir spoons featuring New York City landmarks at prices ranging from $2 to $5.
Date Begin: 
1913
Date End: 
1920
eMuseum Object ID: 
66253
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Spoon

Classification: 
Date: 
1891-1940
Medium: 
Silver
Dimensions: 
Overall: 4 1/4 x 7/8 x 5/8 in. (10.8 x 2.2 x 1.6 cm)
Description: 
Sterling silver souvenir spoon; on obverse of wavy handle, finial to bowl, “COLUMBUS” Arch and the words “NEW YORK”, all in relief; bowl plain; reverse plain.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Roberta Gratz
Object Number: 
2009.28.347
Gallery Label: 
This spoon is part of a collection of 407 New York-themed spoons donated by journalist and urban critic Roberta Brandes Gratz in 2009. During the 1880s, American travelers began collecting spoons in earnest as souvenirs of European cities. Anticipating a demand for American souvenir flatware, a few savvy U.S. manufacturers began patenting designs around 1889. New York City subjects appeared on spoons almost immediately. Gorham became the first major factory to produce New York City spoons, joining the craze in 1891. By 1893, Tiffany & Co. offered eighteen different souvenir spoons featuring New York City landmarks at prices ranging from $2 to $5.
Date Begin: 
1891
Date End: 
1940
eMuseum Object ID: 
66244
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - SILVER
Creative: Tronvig Group