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Pair of ale glasses

Classification: 
Date: 
1775-1800
Medium: 
Lead glass
Dimensions: 
Overall: 4 7/8 × 2 1/8 in. (12.4 × 5.4 cm)
Description: 
Colorless, lead glass. Ale glass, blown and pattern molded; conical bowl with wrythen ribbing; short stem with twisted knop; disk foot; pontil mark
Credit Line: 
Gift of Ivan C. and Marilynn Gelfman Karp
Object Number: 
2011.30.4a
Gallery Label: 
These ale glasses were deaccessioned from the Billiou-Stillwell-Perine House in Staten Island, built in 1665 and now owned by Historic Richmondtown. They were presumably used by members of the Perine family, who occupied the house from 1758 until 1913.
Provenance: 
Billiou-Stillwell-Perine House, Staten Island; antiques dealer Virginia Sloan; collector Marilynn Karp.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1800
eMuseum Object ID: 
68152
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Figurines (2)

Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1918
Medium: 
Frosted glass
Dimensions: 
Overall (a): 8 1/2 in. × 4 in. × 2 in. (21.6 × 10.2 × 5.1 cm) Overall (b): 8 1/8 in. × 3 in. × 3 in. (20.6 × 7.6
Description: 
Lalique-style figurines, each depicting a dancing or a posing woman balanced on an oval base. Unmarked.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Lois Greene Stone
Object Number: 
2011.15.1ab
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1923
eMuseum Object ID: 
67814
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

"New York" glasses, set of eight

Classification: 
Date: 
2010
Medium: 
Crystal
Dimensions: 
Each: 3 3/4 x 3 1/8 in. (9.5 x 7.9 cm)
Description: 
Set of eight glasses representing New York City landmarks through abstract designs. a. Chrysler Building: Confidence, energy, and efficiency made tangible. In 1930, a sunburst of pleated chromium-stell domes and a perfect shining spicule instantly became modernism's archetype. William Van Alen's triumph is transcendent. b. Bow Bridge: Cast iron has never been so elegant. Sixty-foot balustrades of delicate guilloches and cinquefoils connect Cherry Hill and the Ramble. And the gentle rise that Calvery Vaux and Jacob Mould gave their 1862 masterpiece provides gorgeous park and city views. c. Water Towers: When New York went vertical in the 1880s, the modest water tower rose to the occasion. Beveled wooden staves coopered with metal cables and lugs merge low-tech and high efficiency by letting gravity do the work. d. Setbacks: Law meets design. Fear of an ever-darkening Manhattan led to the 1916 Zoning Resolution that limited building mass at various heights. Ipso facto: New York's unique high-rise silhouette. Shown is the graceful 500 Fifth Avenue. e. Guggenheim Museum: Form follows ego. Frank Lloyd Wright loved the controversy surrounding his purposefully iconic helix. This 1959 structural conceit is as non-contextual and impractical as it is exhilarating and unforgettable. f. Transit System: Thanks to Bob Noorda, millions of New Yorkers have been seeing spots before their eyes since 1966. Express, local, or shuttle, this condition is experienced throughout the boroughs. As one of the world's largest transit systems expands, expect these symptoms to increase. g. Utility Grates: Some designs require sensible shoes. The grates over ConEd's vaults are not meant to snag heels, but placing electrical transformers below sidewalk level keeps streets and avenues free from poles and wire. How thoughtful. h. Steam Vents: Manhattan's growing season begins with steam wisping up from utility covers. Orange-and-white banded stalks soon sprout. After asphalt tilling and leaky pipe plugging, the stalks are cut and the season ends...only to start over down the block.
Credit Line: 
Gift of John Ehrlich and Ulf Henricsson
Object Number: 
2010.25a-h
Gallery Label: 
Each glass in this set is etched with a design motif drawn from New York's urban environment. Some, like the Chrysler building spire and the transit system symbols, are readily identifiable; others are more abstract. The eight motifs allude to the cast ironwork on Central Park's Bow Bridge, metal cabling on the city's water towers, the Chrysler Building spire, banded orange-and-white steam vents covering utility holes, skyscraper setbacks, the helix of the Guggenheim Museum, the transit system's circular subway symbols, and the metal utility grates lining the city's sidewalks. The Chicago firm By the Glass, founded in 2010 by John Ehrlich and Ulf Henricsson, has produced thirteen collections of crystal glasses etched with images from American and Brazilian cities.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
2010
eMuseum Object ID: 
66865
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Bottle

Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1750-1760
Medium: 
Glass
Dimensions: 
Overall: 8 1/4 x 4 in. (21 x 10.2 cm)
Description: 
Olive green, non-lead, blown glass bottle; cylindrical neck with applied, V-shaped string rim, rounded shoulders, and a cylindrical body with a push-up and pontil mark. Bottle restored post-excavation. Cork intact.
Credit Line: 
Gift of William Asadorian
Object Number: 
2010.12.4
Gallery Label: 
The bottle was excated from Old Slip, 55 Water Street, New York City, in 1969.
Date Begin: 
1750
Date End: 
1760
eMuseum Object ID: 
66027
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Bottle

Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1750-1760
Medium: 
Glass
Dimensions: 
Overall: 8 1/2 x 4 1/2 in. (21.6 x 11.4 cm)
Description: 
Olive green, non-lead, blown glass bottle; cylindrical neck with applied, V-shaped string rim, rounded shoulders, and a cylindrical body with a push-up and pontil mark. Bottle restored post-excavation.
Credit Line: 
Gift of William Asadorian
Object Number: 
2010.12.3
Gallery Label: 
The bottle was excated from Old Slip, 55 Water Street, New York City, in 1969.
Date Begin: 
1750
Date End: 
1760
eMuseum Object ID: 
66026
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Bottle

Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1720-1730
Medium: 
Glass
Dimensions: 
Overall: 7 x 5 1/2 in. (17.8 x 14 cm)
Description: 
Olive green, non-lead, blown glass bottle with cylindrical neck with applied, string rim, rounded shoulders, domed body with downward sloping sides, high push-up, and blowpipe scar. Piece of paper attached with written text: 175 Water Street, N.Y.C.
Credit Line: 
Gift of William Asadorian
Object Number: 
2010.12.2
Gallery Label: 
The bottled was excated at 175 Water Street, New York City, about 20-25 feet below ground.
Date Begin: 
1720
Date End: 
1730
eMuseum Object ID: 
66025
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Memorial to the Hugenots: The Revocation of the Edict of Nantes

Classification: 
Date: 
1908
Medium: 
Leaded glass
Dimensions: 
Overall (window bay): 165 x 84 1/2 in. (419.1 x 214.6 cm)
Description: 
Six-panel window; central panel depicting Louis XIV pointing to the Edict of Nantes with his sword.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Mrs. Russell Sage
Object Number: 
1908.41
Gallery Label: 
The Edict of Nantes, allowing substantial political independence for Calvinist Protestants (Huguenots), was signed by Henry IV of France in 1598 and was registered in 1599. Subsequently, under Louis XIV, the Catholic clergy sought to remove Protestant power and successfully urges the King to revoke the edict in October 1685. The persecutions that followed led many Hugenots to emigrate, primarily to England, the Netherlands, Germany, Switzerland, and America. The dedication at the bottom of the window reads as follows: "In commemoration of the Huguenots who fled to America owing to the revocation of the privileges accorded by the Feby 1599 Edict of Nantes Oct 1685." The lower left corner is marked with the copyright of the artist. The lower right displays the line "Mary Tillinghast fecit 1908." Mary Tillinghast (1845-1912), a student of John LaFarge, was a painter who specialized in designs for stained glass.
Date Begin: 
1908
Date End: 
1908
eMuseum Object ID: 
65950
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Memorial to Henry Hudson: The Arrival of the Halve Maen, 1609

Classification: 
Date: 
1908
Medium: 
Leaded glass
Dimensions: 
Overall (window bay): 164 1/2 x 84 1/2 in. (417.8 x 214.6 cm)
Description: 
The window depicts Henry Hudson's discovery of the island of Manhattan in 1609. Hudson can be seen standing on the high poopdeck of his ship, the Halve Maen ("half Moon"). The Arms of the Netherlands, the country for whom he was sailing, can be seen in the border of the central upper section. On either side, fruits and flowers represent autumn and the land of plenty. In the upper corners are the arms of Old and New Amsterdam. The drops of oak leaves symbolize Hudson's strength and integrity. In the lower left-hand corner is the insignia of the Dutch East India Company, which financed the voyage. The lower border contains the Seal of the Daughters of Holland Dames, and in the lower right hand corner are the arms of New Netherlands.
Credit Line: 
Gift of the Society of the Daughters of Holland Dames of New York
Object Number: 
1908.40
Date Begin: 
1908
Date End: 
1908
eMuseum Object ID: 
65949
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Wine bottle

Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1660
Medium: 
Glass
Dimensions: 
Overall: 8 1/8 x 4 3/8 in. (20.6 x 11.1 cm)
Description: 
Olive green, non-lead, blown glass bottle in shaft and globe form with applied string rim and applied seal "N P".
Credit Line: 
Purchase, funded by Robert Goelet
Object Number: 
2010.4
Gallery Label: 
This exceedingly rare bottle, made in England around 1660, was excavated in Pelham Bay Park in 1978 near a house site thought to be that of Anne Hutchinson (1591-1643), the religious dissident who left Rhode Island and moved to Pelham Bay in 1642. The bottle bears a seal with the initials "N P," presumably those of the original owner.
Date Begin: 
1655
Date End: 
1665
eMuseum Object ID: 
65821
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Candy container in the shape of a telephone

Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1940s
Medium: 
Clear glass, metal, and wood
Dimensions: 
Overall: 5 x 2 x 2 in. (12.7 x 5.1 x 5.1 cm)
Description: 
Clear glass telephone with attached cork (?)
Credit Line: 
Gift of Ivan C. and Marilynn Gelfman Karp
Object Number: 
2009.52.20
Date Begin: 
1940
Date End: 
1949
eMuseum Object ID: 
65717
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

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Creative: Tronvig Group