"An Execution Sweeps Off the Greater Part of Their Furniture. They Comfort Themselves with the Bottle."

Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1850
Medium: 
Earthenware
Dimensions: 
Diameter: 7 1/2 in. (19.1 cm)
Description: 
Third plate out of set of eight earthenware (pearlware) plastes with flower molded rim, red-painted stripe on rim, and brown transfer-printed scene at center with hand-painted highlights. Based on a series of prints, "The Bottle," by George Cruikshank (1792-1878), published by D. Bogue, London, 1847.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Ivan C. and Marilynn Gelfman Karp
Object Number: 
2010.16.14c
Gallery Label: 
The eight plates of "The Bottle" feature a morality tale advocating temperance. The plates are based on prints by George Cruikshank, a caricaturist and illustrator. "The Bottle" follows the story of a father's descent into alcoholism and the subsequent destruction of his family. The series was hugely popular in London and was also exported to the United States.
Date Begin: 
1850
Date End: 
1850
eMuseum Object ID: 
66247
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

"He is Discharged from His Employment for Drunkenness. They Pawn Their Clothes to Supply the Bottle."

Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1850
Medium: 
Earthenware
Dimensions: 
Diameter: 7 1/2 in. (19.1 cm)
Description: 
Second plate out of set of eight earthenware (pearlware) plastes with flower molded rim, red-painted stripe on rim, and brown transfer-printed scene at center with hand-painted highlights. Based on a series of prints, "The Bottle," by George Cruikshank (1792-1878), published by D. Bogue, London, 1847.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Ivan C. and Marilynn Gelfman Karp
Object Number: 
2010.16.14b
Gallery Label: 
The eight plates of "The Bottle" feature a morality tale advocating temperance. The plates are based on prints by George Cruikshank, a caricaturist and illustrator. "The Bottle" follows the story of a father's descent into alcoholism and the subsequent destruction of his family. The series was hugely popular in London and was also exported to the United States.
Date Begin: 
1850
Date End: 
1850
eMuseum Object ID: 
66246
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

"The Bottle is Brought Out for the First Time. The Husband Induces His Wife Just to Take a Drop"

Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1850
Medium: 
Earthenware
Dimensions: 
Diameter: 7 1/2 in. (19.1 cm)
Description: 
First plate out of set of eight earthenware (pearlware) plates with flower molded rim, red-painted stripe on rim, and brown transfer-printed scene at center with hand-painted highlights. Based on a series of prints, "The Bottle," by George Cruikshank (1792-1878), published by D. Bogue, London, 1847.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Ivan C. and Marilynn Gelfman Karp
Object Number: 
2010.16.14a
Gallery Label: 
The eight plates of "The Bottle" feature a morality tale advocating temperance. The plates are based on prints by George Cruikshank, a caricaturist and illustrator. "The Bottle" follows the story of a father's descent into alcoholism and the subsequent destruction of his family. The series was hugely popular in London and was also exported to the United States.
Date Begin: 
1850
Date End: 
1850
eMuseum Object ID: 
66245
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Plate

Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1976
Medium: 
Whiteware
Dimensions: 
Overall: 10 1/4 in. (26 cm)
Description: 
Circular plate with printed reproduction of New-York Historical Society's portrait of Cornplanter by F. Bartoli (1867.314).
Credit Line: 
Gift of Roy Eddey
Object Number: 
2009.58
Date Begin: 
1976
Date End: 
1976
eMuseum Object ID: 
65609
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Jar

Classification: 
Date: 
1805-1833
Medium: 
Salt-glazed stoneware; Albany slip-glazed interior
Dimensions: 
Overall: 13 x 9 1/2 in. (33 x 24.1 cm)
Description: 
Ovoid jar with rolled "ear" handles, band of coggle decoration of diamonds and ovals below neck; stamped: "PAUL: CUSHMANs"
Credit Line: 
Gift of Dr. Paul Cushman
Object Number: 
2008.38
Marks: 
stamped "PAUL: CUSHMANs"
Gallery Label: 
The enterprising potter Paul Cushman (1767-1833) was Albany's leading stoneware manufacturer during the early nineteenth century. Though his surviving pots are often minimally embellished and sometimes ungainly, he also left a body of creatively decorated and marked vessels. This jar is notable for its coggle decoration, a distinctive technique used by Cushman.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1833
eMuseum Object ID: 
63709
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Tip dish

Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1980
Medium: 
Vitrified china
Dimensions: 
Overall: 3/4 x 5 1/8 in. (1.9 x 13 cm)
Description: 
Small circular ceramic tip dish tinted in off-white glaze and decorated along face with blue border and inscription, "2F./~RESTAURANT LUTECE~/~NEW YORK~"
Credit Line: 
Gift of Robert Petrie
Object Number: 
2008.34
Marks: 
Reverse of tip dish has manufacturer's logo, "Walker/China TM/VITRIFIED/BEDFORD,OHIO"
Inscriptions: 
"2F./ ~RESTAURANT LUTÈCE~/~NEW YORK~"; Marked: "Walker/China ™/VITRIFIED/BEDFORD, OHIO
Gallery Label: 
Donated to the NYHS by docent Robert Petrie, this tip dish, ca. 1980, was from the Upper East Side restaurant, Lutece, located at 219 East 50th Street from 1961 to 2004. The tip dish was retrieved by the donor's mother, who was a frequent diner at Lutece. Initially founded as the Bedford China Company in 1923, the Walker China Company was active from ca. 1941 to 1980. From 1923 to 1941, the manufactory was known as Bailey-Walker China Company.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1985
eMuseum Object ID: 
63453
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Trinket box

Classification: 
Date: 
1939
Medium: 
Porcelain
Dimensions: 
Overall: 2 1/4 x 4 1/2 x 3 3/4 in. (5.7 x 11.4 x 9.5 cm)
Description: 
Molded blue porcelain trinket box with separate lid; streamlined design; bottom with molded fluting at corners and five raised stars at center front and back; top with molded sunrays streaming from upper right corner and molded Trylon and Perisphere (in white) in lower left corner.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Suzanne Mingo
Object Number: 
2008.30.2
Marks: 
Marked in green decal on bottom: "OFFICIALLY APPROVED N.Y.W.F., INC., LIC. 1789 L [script, in wreath] 1939 LENOX MADE IN U.S.A. DESIGNED IN HONOR OF NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR OVINGTON'S NEW YORK"
Gallery Label: 
This box is a high-end souvenirs from the 1939 World's Fair held at Flushing Meadow, Queens. Unlike the typical mass-produced souvenirs that survive in great number, these boxes feature fine materials, sleek design, and a rarefied retail history. The boxes were made by Lenox China of Trenton, New Jersey, expressly for Ovington's, a high-end china importer located on Fifth Avenue and 39th Street. During the 1930s, Lenox was synonymous with elegant tableware, having designed and manufactured the official White House services for the Wilson (1918) and Franklin D. Roosevelt (1934) administrations.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1939
eMuseum Object ID: 
63318
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Trinket box

Classification: 
Date: 
1939
Medium: 
Porcelain
Dimensions: 
Overall: 2 1/4 x 4 1/2 x 3 3/4 in. (5.7 x 11.4 x 9.5 cm)
Description: 
Molded white (ivory) porcelain trinket box with separate lid; streamlined design; bottom with molded fluting at corners and five raised stars at center front and back; top with molded sunrays streaming from upper right corner and molded Trylon and Perisphere in lower left corner.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Suzanne Mingo
Object Number: 
2008.30.1
Marks: 
Marked in green decal on bottom: "OFFICIALLY APPROVED N.Y.W.F., INC., LIC. 1789 L [script, in wreath] 1939 LENOX MADE IN U.S.A. DESIGNED IN HONOR OF NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR OVINGTON'S NEW YORK"
Gallery Label: 
This box is a high-end souvenirs from the 1939 World's Fair held at Flushing Meadow, Queens. Unlike the typical mass-produced souvenirs that survive in great number, these boxes feature fine materials, sleek design, and a rarefied retail history. The boxes were made by Lenox China of Trenton, New Jersey, expressly for Ovington's, a high-end china importer located on Fifth Avenue and 39th Street. During the 1930s, Lenox was synonymous with elegant tableware, having designed and manufactured the official White House services for the Wilson (1918) and Franklin D. Roosevelt (1934) administrations.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1939
eMuseum Object ID: 
63317
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Saucer

Classification: 
Date: 
2007
Medium: 
Porcelain
Dimensions: 
Overall: 6 1/4 in. (15.9 cm)
Description: 
Porcelain saucer from "New York Delft" place setting; blue decal decoration of graffiti around rim.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Lovegrove & Repucci
Object Number: 
2008.23.5
Marks: 
Each marked on underside in decal: LOVEGROVE & PREPUCCI / ESTABLISHED 2003 / www.lovegrovepucci.com
Gallery Label: 
The playful porcelain dinnerware "New York Delft," created by New York City designers Demian Repucci and Nick Lovegrove, makes reference to 18th century blue and white Delftware but updates the tradition with gritty New York City icons including graffiti, taxi cabs, hot dog carts, and delivery trucks. The dinner plate, soup bowl, and saucer feature broad rims decorated with faux graffiti recalling defaced subway cars of the 1970s. Iconic city vehicles adorn the center of the plates and teacup. According to the designers' own description, the pattern "uses the imagery and intricate patterns that surge through the continual visual stream of New York City street life. Rendered in the Dutch Delft vocabulary, modern New York City takes on a new 'classic' look."
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
2012
eMuseum Object ID: 
63263
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Tea cup

Classification: 
Date: 
2007
Medium: 
Porcelain
Dimensions: 
Overall: 2 1/4 x 4 1/2 x 3 1/2 in. (5.7 x 11.4 x 8.9 cm)
Description: 
Porcelain teacup from "New York Delft" place setting; blue decal decoration of hot dog stand.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Lovegrove & Repucci
Object Number: 
2008.23.4
Marks: 
Each marked on underside in decal: LOVEGROVE & PREPUCCI / ESTABLISHED 2003 / www.lovegrovepucci.com
Gallery Label: 
The playful porcelain dinnerware "New York Delft," created by New York City designers Demian Repucci and Nick Lovegrove, makes reference to 18th century blue and white Delftware but updates the tradition with gritty New York City icons including graffiti, taxi cabs, hot dog carts, and delivery trucks. The dinner plate, soup bowl, and saucer feature broad rims decorated with faux graffiti recalling defaced subway cars of the 1970s. Iconic city vehicles adorn the center of the plates and teacup. According to the designers' own description, the pattern "uses the imagery and intricate patterns that surge through the continual visual stream of New York City street life. Rendered in the Dutch Delft vocabulary, modern New York City takes on a new 'classic' look."
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
2012
eMuseum Object ID: 
63262
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

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Creative: Tronvig Group