Aaron Burr (1756-1836)

Classification: 
Collections: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Highlight: 
Display this item in the highlights
Date: 
1836
Medium: 
Plaster with wash
Dimensions: 
Overall: 13 1/4 x 6 1/4 x 7 1/4 in. ( 33.7 x 15.9 x 18.4 cm )
Description: 
Death mask
Credit Line: 
Gift of Dr. John E. Stillwell
Object Number: 
1927.59
Marks: 
inscribed: on interior in red paint: "78S" [old N-YHS cat #]
Gallery Label: 
Made for Fowler & Wells of NY, phrenologists, Sept. 14, 1836. Mask made at cost of $50.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1836
eMuseum Object ID: 
17695
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Architect's Sign

Classification: 
Collections: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Highlight: 
Display this item in the highlights
Date: 
ca. 1837
Medium: 
Wood
Dimensions: 
Overall: 40 x 25 3/4 x 4 1/2 in. ( 101.6 x 65.4 x 11.4 cm )
Description: 
Rectangular wooden sign with wrought iron hooks for hanging; high relief applied wooden Greek portico affixed to both sides (one side missing); black painted ground and brown portico; gilded inscription across bottom.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Mr. Thomas E. Snook, Jr.
Object Number: 
1953.197
Marks: 
painted in gold: on both sides: "JNO. B. SNOOK/ Architect./ ESTABLISHED 1837"
Gallery Label: 
This trade sign, depicting the facade of a Greek temple, hung in front of the office of architect John Butler Snook (1815-1901), who established his firm in 1837. A largely self-taught architect, Snook played an instrumental role in developing the streetscape of downtown Manhattan. Among his notable buildings were the A.T. Stewart "Marble Palace" (1845-46), Grand Central Depot (1869-71), the Metropolitan Hotel (1849-52), as well as numerous private homes.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1837
eMuseum Object ID: 
17037
Exclude from TMS update: 
OFF
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Euphemia Toussaint (1815-1829)

Collections: 
Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1825
Medium: 
Watercolor on ivory
Dimensions: 
Overall: 3 1/8 x 2 1/2 in. ( 7.9 x 6.4 cm )
Description: 
N-YHS Museum Collection Portrait miniature of Euphemia Toussaint (1815-1829); watercolor and gouache on ivory, framed in a wooden backboard with a stamped gilded copper bezel; an oval inscribed backing card is visible under heavy mylar in the back of the frame; the oval is secured by the bezel teeth; the inscription reads "Eupemia / -Niece and adopted / daughter of Pierre / Touissant - born in / 1815 - died in 1829.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Miss Georgina Schuyler
Object Number: 
1920.6
Gallery Label: 
The subject was the niece and adopted daughter of Pierre Toussaint, a Haitian slave who became a hairdresser in New York City. Both her mother Rosalie and her uncle Pierre had been brought to New York from Haiti about 1787 by their master, Jean Bérard. The subject was born in New York and died at the age of fourteen.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1825
eMuseum Object ID: 
16891
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Marian Anderson (1897-1993)

Classification: 
Collections: 
Date: 
c. 1940-45
Medium: 
Watercolor, gouache, white tempera, and charcoal on heavy watercolor paper
Dimensions: 
Overall: 27 1/4 x 20 5/8 in. (69.2 x 52.4 cm)
Description: 
Portrait
Credit Line: 
Gift of Enit Kaufman
Object Number: 
1947.216
Gallery Label: 
In 1939, Marian Anderson (1897-1993) a celebrated African American contralto was denied the right to perform in Constitution Hall in Washington, DC on grounds of traditional racial segregation. She subsequently devoted much of her life to improving prospects for blacks in the performing arts. Among other events, she is remembered for singing at President John F. Kennedy's inaugural in 1961.
Provenance: 
Enit Kaufman and Dorothy Canfield Fisher, American Portraits (New York: Henry Holt and Company, 1946)
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
0
eMuseum Object ID: 
16718
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Mrs. William Walton (1708-1786)

Classification: 
Collections: 
Date: 
ca. 1750
Medium: 
Oil on canvas
Dimensions: 
Overall: 50 x 40 1/4 in. ( 127 x 102.2 cm )
Credit Line: 
Bequest of Theodora M. Storm
Object Number: 
1902.4
Gallery Label: 
Cornelia Beekman was the daughter of Dr. William Beekman and Catharine Peters (Delanoy) Beekman. She married William Walton in 1731. The couple lived in one of New York's finest mansions, Walton House, on what is now Pearl Street.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1750
eMuseum Object ID: 
14349
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Checkers Up At The Farm

Classification: 
Collections: 
Date: 
1875
Medium: 
Painted plaster
Dimensions: 
Overall: 20 x 17 1/4 x 11 1/4 in. ( 50.8 x 43.8 x 28.6 cm )
Description: 
Genre figure
Credit Line: 
Gift of Mr. Samuel V. Hoffman
Object Number: 
1928.29
Marks: 
signed: front of base: "JOHN ROGERS/NEW YORK" inscribed: front of base: "CHECKERS/UP AT THE FARM" inscribed: proper left rear of base: "PATENTED/DECEMBER 28 1875"
Gallery Label: 
Board games are a recurring theme in Rogers' work, particularly the game of checkers. In 1855 he modeled a small clay group after the painting The Card Players by the English genre painter Sir David Wilkie. He reprised the theme a few years later, in 1859-60. He returned to the subject once again in 1875, and instead of creating a simple variation on a well-known English theme, he developed a much more sophisticated composition that addresses uniquely American class issues and demonstrates how much he had matured as an artist, both technically and intellectually, in the intervening years. Rogers' 1859-60 Checker Players (1949.276, 1936.717) offers a simple vignette of two rural men, one old and one young, with the younger crowing over his anticipated victory. In this later version, the opponents are pointedly differentiated by class. Rogers' sales catalogue described the two men as "a gentleman who has gone up to the farm with his wife and baby" and "the farmer, who has forced his opponent's pieces into positions where they cannot be moved without being taken." The older player is a well-to-do city dweller, as can be seen by his suit, spats, and fashionable muttonchops. He stoops over the game board and holds a fan at his side, a feminine accessory that slightly compromises his masculinity. The young farmer across from him sits bolt upright, full of energy. He is clean-shaven and simply dressed in shirtsleeves and sturdy boots. He points out his winning position to the gentleman with a hearty laugh. Checkers Up at the Farm struck a chord with Americans; it was Rogers' most popular group next to Coming to the Parson, selling about five thousand plasters. Rogers included it in his contribution to the 1876 Centennial Exhibition; ever the canny marketer, he was no doubt aware that a subject embracing rural America would prove highly popular with the many millions who descended on Philadelphia's Fairmount Park from all parts of the country. Written responses to the group reflect its appeal to the general public. Critics relished telling the tale of the simple farmer besting the sophisticated urbanite with native unspoiled intelligence, describing the men's garb and behavior in detail. During this period class differences grew ever more marked, and populations were increasingly concentrated in cities. In addition, concerns were building about the effects of cloistered, sedentary, office life on the modern man's masculinity. Rogers' vignette offered an affirmation of native Yankee intelligence and the virtues of country life in the person of the clever, virile farmer. Rogers' new 1875 composition is considerably more complex than the one he presented fifteen years before. The mastery of texture and detail, human anatomy and expression that he developed in the intervening years is remarkable. He also added two figures in the form of the city gentleman's wife and baby. The artist's wife, Hattie, posed as the attractive, well-dressed woman who watches the game with interest and holds their baby, who plays at trying to kick the checkers off the game board. At first glance they seem superfluous, but Rogers explained in his sales catalogue that they were on a family visit. Perhaps his intention was to soften his critique of class differences by making the urban man more sympathetic through his fatherly role. Though press notices rarely pointed it out, the city gentleman takes his defeat with an expression of good humor. His easy and benevolent acknowledgment of his country opponent's virtues allowed both urban and rural Americans to share the joke.
Bibliography: 
Articles, Scrapbooks of miscellaneous clippings, etc. about John Rogers, Vols. 1, 4, New York Historical Society. Daily Evening Transcript, Boston, Feb. 25, 1876, p.2. The Evening Post, New York, June 9, 1876, p. 1. NY Daily Graphic, Jan. 8, 1877, p. 3. Partridge, William Ordway, "John Rogers, The Peoples Sculptor," The New England Magazine, Feb., 1896, Vol. XIII, No. 6, pp. 705-21. Barck, Dorothy, "Rogers Group in the Museum of the New-York Historical Society", New-York Historical Society Quarterly, Vol. XVI, No. 3, October, 1932, p. 74. Smith, Mrs. and Mrs. Chetwood, Rogers Groups: Thought and Wrought by John Rogers, Boston: Charles E. Goodspeed & Co., 1934, pp.82-3. Wallace, David H., John Rogers, The People's Sculptor, Middleton, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 1967, pp. 112, 116-7, 150, 181-2, 239, 263, 294, 304. Craven, Wayne, Sculpture in America, New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Company, 1968, pp. 357-366. Holzer, Harold, and Farber, Joseph, "The Sculpture of John Rogers," Antiques Magazine, April 1970, pp. 756-68. DePietro, Anne Cohen, American Sculpture . . . Perfection or Reality?, Heckscher Museum, 1983, pp. 1-8. Bleier, Paul and Meta, John Rogers Statuary, Atglen, PA: Schiffer Publishing Ltd., 2001, pp. 156-7.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1875
eMuseum Object ID: 
11262
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

The Intelligence Office

Classification: 
Collections: 
Date: 
1849
Medium: 
Oil on canvas
Dimensions: 
Overall: 22 x 27 in. ( 55.9 x 68.6 cm ) frame: 29 x 34 1/2 x 3 1/2 in. (29 x 34 1/2 x 3 1/2 in.)
Description: 
Genre painting that depicts a female employment office; the two women off to the left respond to the ad in the Sun newspaper, which is crumpled at one of the women's feet; the woman sitting in the chair is the potential employer; in the center, is the agent presiding over the of the office; his duties, which are stated on a sign on the wall next to him, say that he is "warranted" to provide domestic employers who are "honest".
Credit Line: 
Purchase, Abbott-Lenox Fund
Object Number: 
1959.46
Inscriptions: 
Inscribed on reverse: The Intelijuns Ofis / Wm. Henri Bur / June 1849
Bibliography: 
Weinberg, H. Barbara, and Barratt, Carrie Rebora, Eds., American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life 1765-1915, New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2009, pp. 31-2, 72.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1849
eMuseum Object ID: 
7246
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Wig curler

Classification: 
Collections: 
Date: 
1760-1775
Medium: 
Clay
Dimensions: 
Overall: 2 7/8 x 1/2 x 1/2 in. ( 7.3 x 1.3 x 1.3 cm )
Description: 
Clay wig curler; short, white cylindrical body which becomes bulbous at both ends.
Object Number: 
INV.5924.77
Gallery Label: 
This wig curler was excavated by the Field Exploration Committee at the British Revolutionary War camp on the Dyckman farm, located between Seaman and Payson Avenues, and 204th and Academy Streets in Washington Heights, Manhattan. It belonged to a British or Hessian officer, or possibly a woman.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1775
eMuseum Object ID: 
7105
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

The Daughters of Heber Reginald Bishop (Elizabeth, Harriet, Mary, and Edith)

Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1895
Medium: 
Watercolor on ivory
Dimensions: 
Overall: 3 3/4 x 3 in. ( 9.5 x 7.6 cm )
Credit Line: 
Gift of the Estate of Peter Marié
Object Number: 
1905.22
Marks: 
signature: right: "C. and F. Weidner"
Gallery Label: 
Heber R. Bishop (1840-1902) was an officer of several corporations, among which was a firm he established in 1861, Bishop and Company. He and his wife, Mary (Cunningham) Bishop, had four daughters, who are represented in this miniature.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1895
eMuseum Object ID: 
3814
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

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