The Indian Hunter

Classification: 
Collections: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
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Date: 
1860
Medium: 
Brown patinated bronze
Dimensions: 
Overall: 16 x 14 x 10 in. ( 40.6 x 35.6 x 25.4 cm )
Description: 
Genre figure: Native American holding bow and arrow with dog.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Mr. George A. Zabriskie
Object Number: 
1939.390
Bibliography: 
"Art. Artists' Reception,'" The Round Table: A Saturday Review of Politics, Finance, Literature, Society and Art, March 5, 1864, p. 184. "Fine Arts. Mr. Ward's Indian Hunter," The Nation, October 19, 1865, pp. 506-7. "Art. Mr. Ward's 'Indian Hunter,'" The Round Table: A Saturday Review of Politics, Finance, Literature, Society and Art, October 28, 1865, p. 124. "The New Statue. J. Quincy Ward's 'Indian Hunter,'" The New York Evening Post, November 3, 1865, p. 1. "Ward's Statue," Harper's Weekly, Vol. IX, No. 469, December 23, 1865, p. 812. Tuckerman, Henry T., Book of the Artists. American Artist Life, comprising biographical and critical sketches of American artists: preceded by an historical account of the rise and progress of art in America, New York: G.P. Putnam & Son, 1867, pp. 580-2. "Presentation of Ward's 'Indian Hunter' to the Central Park," New York Times, February 5, 1869, p. 2. Walton, William, "The Work of John Quincy Adams Ward, 1830-1910, The International Studio, Vol. XL, No. 160, June 1910, pp. LXXXI-LXXXVIII. New-York Historical Society Quarterly Bulletin, 23, July 1939, p. 137. Sharp, Lewis I., John Quincy Adams Ward Dean of American Sculpture: with A catalogue Raisonne, Newark: University of Delaware Press, 1985, pp. 36-57, 83, 91-100, 146-50, 165-6. Shapiro, Michael Edward, Bronze Casting and American Sculpture 1850-1900, Newark: University of Delaware Press, 1985, pp. 61-76, 167-76, 184-86, 198. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, American Figurative Sculpture in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Boston: Northeastern University Press, 1986, pp. 168-72. Tolles, Thayer, American Sculpture in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Volume I. A Catalogue of Works by Artists Born before 1865, New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1999, pp. 137-9. Hassrick, Peter H., The American West: Out of Myth, into Reality, Washington, D.C.; trust for Museum Exhibitions, 2000, Fig. 56.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1860
eMuseum Object ID: 
28436
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Wooden leg of Gouverneur Morris

Classification: 
Collections: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
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Date: 
ca. 1780
Medium: 
Oak, leather, metal
Dimensions: 
Overall: 42 1/2 x 14 1/2 in. ( 108 x 36.8 cm )
Description: 
Turned and carved oak prosthetic leg made in two sections; lower section tapers downward and has knob at base; upper section attached with metal ring and screws and forms U-shape with one side twice as long as the other; center of U lined with green leather; short side has slots for tie to secure leg; mounted on circular wooden base with metal rods.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Mrs. Frederick Menzies
Object Number: 
1954.148
Gallery Label: 
This artifical limb was used by Founding Father Gouverneur Morris (1752-1816), who lost his left leg in a carriage accident at the age of twenty-eight. The gallant statesman was notorious for his many affairs, and rumors persisted that his injury resulted from jumping out a window to escape a jealous husband.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1780
eMuseum Object ID: 
27877
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Fragment of the equestrian statue of King George III (tail)

Collections: 
Classification: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Date: 
1770-1776
Medium: 
Lead
Dimensions: 
Overall: 8 1/2 x 19 x 13 in. ( 21.6 x 48.3 x 33 cm )
Description: 
Fragment of molded lead statue; traces of gilding on one side; fragment molded in rippled form, probably for horse's tail.
Credit Line: 
Purchase
Object Number: 
1878.6
Gallery Label: 
The gilded statue of George III placed at Bowling Green by the British Government was torn from its pedestal by a jubilant crowd after a public reading of the Declaration of Independence on July 9, 1776. Fragments of the statue were transported to Litchfield, Connecticut and made into bullets for the Revolutionary troops. It is believed that Connecticut Loyalists took some of the fragments and hid them in and around their homes, for pieces such as this have been found buried in the area.
Bibliography: 
Ramirez, Jan Seidler. "A History of the New-York Historical Society." The Magazine Antiques 167 (2005): 138-145.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1776
eMuseum Object ID: 
27811
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Chaise (side chair)

Classification: 
Collections: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
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Date: 
1779
Medium: 
Beech, gilding; silk upholstery
Dimensions: 
Overall: 41 x 23 x 21 in. ( 104.1 x 58.4 x 53.3 cm )
Description: 
Carved and gilded beechwood Louis XVI chaise (side chair) with arched rectangular back in molded frame with carved paquerettes and acanthus; trapezoidal seat with seat rail carved similarly to the crest rail; on circular tapering spiral-reeded legs headed by leaf tips and beaded. Original upholstery housed separately; chair currently upholstered in fabric reproducing original covering.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Mrs. Gouverneur Morris
Object Number: 
1817.13
Marks: 
stenciled: on chair webbing: French Royal Inventory Number-Versailles Crowned W #194
Gallery Label: 
This elaborately carved and gilded chair was originally part of a suite that Marie-Antoinette ordered in 1779 for her private apartments at Versailles. New Yorker Gouverneur Morris, the American ambassador to France, purchased the suite at an auction of royal effects held after the fall of the ancien régime. The chair's upholstery reproduces the design of the original.
Provenance: 
Made for the Grand Cabinet Interior de la Reine de Versailles, Marie Antoinette, ca. 1779 Gouverneur Morris, ca. 1793 to 1816 (U.S. Minister to French Court during French Revolution).
Bibliography: 
Olson, Roberta J. M. "A selection of European paintings and objects." The Magazine Antiques 167 (2005): 182-187.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1779
eMuseum Object ID: 
27778
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Fire engine condenser case of the Clinton Fire Company No. 41

Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Date: 
ca. 1842
Medium: 
Wood, oil paint, gilding
Dimensions: 
Overall: 32 x 30 1/4 x 15 in. ( 81.3 x 76.8 x 38.1 cm )
Description: 
Wooden fire engine condenser case; half-cylindrical form with overhanging top and painted image on front framed by arch over pilasters, with elaborately carved oversize keystone and scrolling leaves in gilding on spandrels; painted image of landscape with female figure in foreground placing wreath on the head of a male portrait bust that stands on a pedestal next to her, with eagle in profile view on ground in front of pedestal.
Credit Line: 
Purchased from Elie Nadelman
Object Number: 
1937.1631
Gallery Label: 
This condenser case belonged to New York City's Clinton, No. 41 Engine Company, as indicated by the bust of DeWitt Clinton, Governor of New York, and the depiction of Albany (the seat of the state government) in the background. An allegorical figure known as the "Genius of Agriculture" crowns the bust of Clinton with a laurel wreath, while an eagle (another emblem of the American Republic) looks on from the lower left. This case is mentioned in an account of a parade during the Croton Aqueduct celebration of October 14, 1842 where No. 41 was the largest company represented, numbering about 80 members. There, a yellow-painted engine with red and gilt stripes featured a painting on its condenser cover with "a pedestal on which is a bust of DeWitt Clinton, with the Genius of Agriculture crowning him with a wreath of flowers. At the base of the pedestal is an American eagle; on the right, a view of the City of Albany; on the left, a distant view of the Erie Canal" (Sheldon, The Story of the Volunteer Fire Department of the City of New York, 1882, p. 505). DeWitt Clinton, engine no. 41's namesake, was considered to be a father of the Croton Aqueduct and the Croton Reservoir of New York City.
Provenance: 
The Folk Art Collection of Elie Nadelman
Bibliography: 
Denker, Ellen Paul. "Collector' legacies." The Magazine Antiques 167 (2005): 176-180.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1842
eMuseum Object ID: 
27756
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Tammany Bank

Classification: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
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Date: 
ca. 1875
Medium: 
Iron, paint
Dimensions: 
Overall: 5 3/4 x 4 3/8 x 3 in. ( 14.6 x 11.1 x 7.6 cm )
Description: 
Cast iron mechanical bank in the form of man seated in chair with low arms and high bank; chair painted green with brown trim, with pierced decoration; man dressed in brown suit with yellow waistcoat, posed with one hand raised (with separate notch of metal to hold coin); cast inscription with fan motif on each side of chair; when coin is placed in figure's hand, the weight of the coin causes the hand to lower and deposit the coin into the pocket of the figure.
Credit Line: 
Purchased from Elie Nadelman
Object Number: 
1937.1237
Marks: 
Inscription: cast on each side of chair: "TAMMANY BANK [with fan motif at center]" Mark: cast on back of chair, top: "PATD DEC 23 1873" Nadelman collection sticker: "450/Am"
Gallery Label: 
This mechanical bank is said to represent Boss Tweed, the notorious Tammany Hall leader, pocketing illicit money. The Tammany Bank is based on Patent No. 145,734, issued to John Hall on Dec. 23, 1873.
Provenance: 
The Folk Art Collection of Elie Nadelman
Bibliography: 
Denker, Ellen Paul. "Collector' legacies." The Magazine Antiques 167 (2005): 176-180.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1875
eMuseum Object ID: 
27565
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Draft wheel

Exhibitions: 
Collections: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
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Date: 
ca. 1863
Medium: 
Wood, metal
Dimensions: 
Overall: 23 x 25 1/2 x 21 3/4 in. ( 58.4 x 64.8 x 55.2 cm )
Description: 
Civil War draft wheel; cylindrical drum with a rectangular, lockable hatch and an iron and wood handle, set on trestle frame with bracket feet and a turned stretcher; brass plaque on side. [3,606 registration cards with names of draft-eligible men, originally found in the drum, are held by the N-YHS Library].
Credit Line: 
Gift of Frederic C. Wagner
Object Number: 
1865.6
Marks: 
Plaque (engraved): DRAFT WHEEL/ USED JULY 13, 1863/ WITH NAMES OF RESIDENTS IN THE/ 7TH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT N.Y. CITY/ COMPRISING THE 11TH AND 17TH WARDS/ PRESENTED BY FREDERIC C. WAGNER/ CAPTAIN AND PROVOST MARSHALL/ JUNE 20TH 1865 Description: Brass
Gallery Label: 
This drum-shaped wheel was used in the draft lottery for the Civil War held on July 13, 1863 in the 7th Congressional District, comprising the 11th and 17th Wards of New York City (the East Side below 14th Street and above Rivington Street). The draft lottery, part of the nation's first conscription act, touched off the worst urban riots in American history.
Bibliography: 
Holzer, Harold, ed. "Lincoln and New York." New York: The New-York Historical Society and London: Philip Wilson Publishers Ltd., 2009. Holzer, Harold and The New-York Historical Society. "The Civil War in 50 Objects." New York: Viking, 2013.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1863
eMuseum Object ID: 
27323
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Balustrade section from Federal Hall, New York

Collections: 
Classification: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Date: 
1788-1789
Medium: 
Painted wrought iron
Dimensions: 
Overall: 37 9/16 x 70 x 1 3/4 in. ( 95.4 x 177.8 x 4.4 cm )
Description: 
Wrought iron railing from Federal Hall, New York City; rectangular section with molded upper rail above band of circles with foliate scrolls surrounding central cartouche with fan of thirteen arrows above band of ovals above square base rail; remains of yellow-gold paint; currently mounted on a later oak base.
Credit Line: 
Gift of the Chamber of Commerce of the State of New York
Object Number: 
1884.3
Gallery Label: 
This is the center section of the balcony railing of Federal Hall, where Washington was inaugurated as first President of the U.S. on April 30, 1789. The railing was removed when Federal Hall was demolished in 1812 and incorporated into a portico on the Administrative Building at Bellevue Hospital. It was removed in 1883, and presented to the N-YHS the following year.
Bibliography: 
Ledes, Allison E., ed. "The Magazine Antiques: January 2005." New York: Brant Publications, Inc., 2005.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1789
eMuseum Object ID: 
27319
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Stained glass window

Classification: 
Collections: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
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Date: 
ca. 1656
Medium: 
Glass
Dimensions: 
Overall: 30 1/2 x 27 1/4 x 1 in. ( 77.5 x 69.2 x 2.5 cm )
Description: 
Stained glass window; oval pane painted in polychrome enamels with strapwork frame with a coat of arms consisting of a shield divided vertically into two fields with a fruit tree on the left and a crossbow on the right, surmounted by a helmet, all surrounded by foliate scrollwork, all over cartouche with the inscription "Cornelis woutersz hogenboom/ en machtet Cornelis de wit syn/ huysfroiu 1643" (Cornelis son of Walter Hoenboom and Cornelis DeWit his wife 1643); pane set in leaded glass window with rectangular panes and an oak frame with iron corner brackets.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Mrs. Howard C. Robbins
Object Number: 
1951.414c
Marks: 
painted: cartouche with the inscription "Cornelis woutersz hogenboom/ en machtet Cornelis de wit syn/ huysfroiu 1643" (Cornelis son of Walter Hoenboom and Cornelis DeWit his wife 1643)
Gallery Label: 
This is one of a small group of stained glass windows attributed to Duyckink that are thought to have been made for the First Reformed Dutch Church built in Albany, NY in 1656 and torn down in 1715. This window was removed from a house on Eighth St. in New York City and found by Mrs. Howard Robbins in a wrecker's yard and used in her Dutch Revival house at Sneden's Landing on the Hudson.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1656
eMuseum Object ID: 
27282
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Stained glass window

Classification: 
Collections: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Highlight: 
Display this item in the highlights
Date: 
ca. 1656
Medium: 
Glass
Dimensions: 
Overall: 30 1/2 x 27 1/4 x 1 1/4 in. ( 77.5 x 69.2 x 3.2 cm )
Description: 
Stained glass window; oval pane painted in polychrome enamels with strapwork frame with a coat of arms consisting of a shield containing a three ostrich-like birds, surmounted by a helmet surmounted by an ostrich-like bird, all surrounded by foliate scrollwork, all over cartouche with the inscription "Joris CLaesz vanderLaen/ Anno 1630" (Joris son of Nicholas Vanderlaen, Anno 1630); pane set in leaded glass window with rectangular panes and an oak frame with iron corner brackets.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Mrs. Howard C. Robbins
Object Number: 
1951.414b
Marks: 
painted: cartouche with the inscription "Joris CLaesz vanderLaen/ Anno 1630" (Joris son of Nicholas Vanderlaen, Anno 1630)
Gallery Label: 
This is one of a small group of stained glass windows attributed to Duyckink that are thought to have been made for the First reformed Dutch Church built in Albany, NY in 1656 and torn down in 1715. This window was removed from a house on Eighth St. in New York City and found by Mrs. Howard Robbins in a wrecker's yard and used in her Dutch Revival house at Sneden's Landing on the Hudson.
Bibliography: 
Olson, Roberta J. M. “A selection of European paintings and objects.” The Magazine Antiques, Vol. 167, no.1, January 2005, p.182-187.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1656
eMuseum Object ID: 
27277
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

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