Slave shackles

Classification: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Highlight: 
Display this item in the highlights
Date: 
ca. 1866
Medium: 
Steel
Dimensions: 
Overall: 4 1/4 x 23 x 1/4 in. ( 10.8 x 58.4 x 0.6 cm )
Description: 
Pair of steel ankle shackles; round cuffs with a soldered peg closure; four oval chain links attach the two cuffs.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Mrs. Carroll Beckwith
Object Number: 
1921.20
Gallery Label: 
According to a letter that accompanied these shackles upon their donation to the Historical Society in 1921, they were cut off teenage slave Mary Horn of Americus, Georgia, by Colonel William W. Badger of the 176th Regiment New York Volunteers, more than a year after Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation. Mary is said to have belonged to a Judge Horn, who riveted the irons to her legs with his own hands to prevent her from walking to the next plantation to see her beloved, George. George begged Colonel Badger to free Mary from her shackles and supposedly held her over an anvil while Badger cut them off.
Bibliography: 
Holzer, Harold and The New-York Historical Society. "The Civil War in 50 Objects." New York: Viking, 2013.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1866
eMuseum Object ID: 
33369
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Cake board

Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Highlight: 
Display this item in the highlights
Date: 
1825-1835
Medium: 
Wood (possibly mahogany)
Dimensions: 
Overall: 8 x 14 1/2 x 1 in. ( 20.3 x 36.8 x 2.5 cm )
Description: 
Rectangular wooden (possibly mahogany) cake board carved on one side with image of three firemen pulling Manhattan fire engine number 8 within a swag and star oval frame; reverse carved with image of three firemen pulling Superior fire engine number 17 within an oval foliate frame.
Credit Line: 
Purchased from Elie Nadelman
Object Number: 
1937.1562
Marks: 
carved: on obverse: "MANHATTAN" (above fire engine) and "8" (2 times on engine) carved: on reverse: ""SUPERIOR" (above fire engine) and "17" (on engine)
Gallery Label: 
Molds created in New York were often elaborate and large, depicting major events of the day or simply embellished with symbols of luck and the new year. One of the most famous mold makers was John Conger, who was actually a baker by trade, but who oversaw a workshop of carvers in New York City that created some of the finest molds made in this country. Conger's period of activity ran from about 1825 to 1845. Conger molds have often survived in better shape than most because he used dense Honduran mahogany, which held up better under repeated washings.
Provenance: 
The Folk Art Collection of Elie Nadelman
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1835
eMuseum Object ID: 
32643
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Wedding dress

Classification: 
Collections: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Highlight: 
Display this item in the highlights
Date: 
ca. 1712 with several alterations into the 20th century
Medium: 
Silk brocade, needlepoint lace; silk chiffon
Dimensions: 
Overall: 55 x 70 in. ( 139.7 x 177.8 cm ) Part (waist ): 31 1/2 in. (80 cm)
Description: 
Yellow and cream silk brocade dress a` l' Anglaise of English "lace" period textile design, possibly Anna Maria Garthwaite; fitted bodice cut separately from skirt with pleat from back of shoulder continuing down front (originally it would have been a robe and been known as "robe a`l'Anglaise"; originally worn pinned to sides of matching stomacher (no longer extant, but possibly made into front waist fitting); yellow brocade piece turned to cross grain and made into front waist fitting attached below a silk chiffon modesty piece creating a low square neckline (all alteration - sub index letter e); three-quarter length fitted sleeves with large turned-back cuff and needlepoint lace ruffles with a floral pattern at the edge; full round skirt and matching petticoat with pleats at sides; needlepoint net and lace engageantes not original to dress.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Mrs. Arthur T. Sutcliffe
Object Number: 
1949.115a
Gallery Label: 
This wedding dress was worn by Cornelia de Peyster, daughter of Isaac and Maria (Van Ball) de Peyster, on October 12, 1712, when she married Oliver Stephen Teller (b. 1685), son of Andres and Sophia (Van Cortlandt) Teller. The dress has undergone alerations, most for Alice Crary Sutcliffe, who wore it for her wedding on April 30, 1908.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1712
eMuseum Object ID: 
31393
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Batter pitcher

Classification: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Highlight: 
Display this item in the highlights
Date: 
1798
Medium: 
Stoneware, cobalt oxide
Dimensions: 
Overall: 11 x 8 1/2 in. ( 27.9 x 21.6 cm )
Description: 
Salt-glazed stoneware batter pitcher with stamped flowers, incised leaves decorated with cobalt blue, and maker's name and date hand inscribed across belly.
Credit Line: 
Purchased from Elie Nadelman
Object Number: 
1937.587
Marks: 
inscribed: by hand around belly: "New York Feby 17th. 1798 / Flowered by Clarkson Crolius / Blue"
Gallery Label: 
Batter pitchers were generally used by women for keeping and pouring pancake batter. This elaborate piece may have been a store sample, displaying a variety of decorative techniques that customers could choose from; or, more likely, it was a lovingly designed gift made by Clarkson Crolius for his wife.
Provenance: 
The Folk Art Collection of Elie Nadelman
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1798
eMuseum Object ID: 
30550
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Kerchief

Classification: 
Collections: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Highlight: 
Display this item in the highlights
Date: 
1776-1777
Medium: 
Linen
Dimensions: 
Overall: 30 x 30 in. ( 76.2 x 76.2 cm )
Description: 
Cotton block-printed kerchief with a portrait of George Washington on horseback in center medallion, surrounded by an inscription and flags and cannons; floral border; red ink on a white ground.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Mrs. J. Insley Blair
Object Number: 
1952.63
Marks: 
printed: around medallion: "GEORGE WASHINGTON, ESQ. FOUNDATOR AND PROTECTOR OF AMERICA'S LIBERTY AND JNDEPENDENCY"
Gallery Label: 
Likely printed by Philadelphia calico printer John Hewson, this kerchief was long believed to have been made at the personal request of Martha Washington in 1775. The reference to "America's Independency" indicates that the kerchief may have been printed shortly following the Declaration of Independence, while the absence of the official Stars and Stripes flag suggests a date before July, 1777. The kerchief has been described as an early attempt by George Washington at "image" management.
Bibliography: 
Ramirez, Jan Seidler. "A History of the New-York Historical Society." The Magazine Antiques 167 (2005): 138-145.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1777
eMuseum Object ID: 
29367
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Snake jug

Classification: 
Collections: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Highlight: 
Display this item in the highlights
Date: 
1871
Medium: 
Stoneware
Dimensions: 
Overall: 12 1/4 x 11 1/2 in. ( 31.1 x 29.2 cm )
Description: 
Bulbous salt-glazed stoneware jug decorated with applied squirming snakes with human faces, each representing different members of the Boss Tweed Ring with the head of Thomas Nast on the jug neck above the others; political sarcasms are hand inscribed all over; stopper is composed of a coiled snake.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Mrs. Thomas Nast
Object Number: 
1906.6ab
Inscriptions: 
Inscribed: in rectangle near base: "From, / Kirkpatrick, / Anna Ills / Th. Nast NY"
Gallery Label: 
The swirling mass of snakes and heads on this jug represents the Boss Tweed ring, a notoriously corrupt group of New York City politicians. The jug was created as a thank you gift for Thomas Nast, a renowned political cartoonist of the 1860s and '70s. Nast had used his cartoons to attack Tweed and his henchmen, who controlled the political machine known as Tammany Hall. Tweed is the bearded head without glasses, and most of the other heads represent his associates.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1871
eMuseum Object ID: 
29332
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Badge of the Society of the Cincinnati

Collections: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Date: 
ca. 1802
Medium: 
Silk, gold, enamel
Dimensions: 
Badge (and ribbon): 3 3/4 x 1 1/2 in. (9.5 x 3.8 cm)
Description: 
Badge consisting of silk ribbon of pale blue with white edges, attached by gold loop to badge in the form of an eagle with outstretched wings and a wreath around his head; obverse has eagle head facing left, and oval plaque at center of eagle with enameled image of Cincinnatus receiving a sword; reverse has eagle head facing right and enameled plaque at center with scene of city and Cincinnatus in foreground; eagle, plaque and portion of wreath decorated with enamels; plaques with Latin inscriptions around perimeter of oval. Separate length of unused silk ribbon (b).
Credit Line: 
Gift of Miss Francis Jay, Mrs. Alexander Duer Harvey, Mrs. Lloyd Kirkham Garrison, and Mrs. Lawrence W. Fox, in memory of Mrs. Pierre Jay (nee Louisa Shaw Barlow) by her children
Object Number: 
1972.12ab
Marks: 
written: on reverse of enamel plaque: "SOCIETAS : CINCINNATORUM : INSTITUTA : AD : 1783" written: on obverse of enamel plaque: "OMNIA : RELINQUIT : SERVARE : REMPUBLICAM"
Gallery Label: 
This badge belonged to Matthew Clarkson (1758-1825), an original member of the Society of the Cincinnati. The badge appears in a portrait of Clarkson by Gilbert Stuart at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The original medal, which was distributed to Revolutionary War officers, was designed by Major Pierre Charles L'Enfant and the die cut in Paris in 1784. This example was made in New York City around 1802 and is one of only five known surviving examples.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1802
eMuseum Object ID: 
28974
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Pewterers' banner

Classification: 
Collections: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Highlight: 
Display this item in the highlights
Date: 
1788
Medium: 
Silk, paint
Dimensions: 
Frame: 92 x 120 x 2 3/4 in. (233.7 x 304.8 x 7 cm)
Description: 
Painted silk banner with fringe on top, bottom, and right sides; painted American flag with 13 stars in upper left corner; pewterers' arms below flag, with two figures on either side of a shield and banner reading "SOLID AND PURE."; at right, painted image of interior of a pewterer's shop, with "SOCIETY of PEWTERERS" painted above shelf of three pewter objects; four figures at work making pewter objects.
Credit Line: 
Gift of James S. Haring
Object Number: 
1903.12
Marks: 
painted: at top right: "The Federal Plan Most Solid & Secure/Americans Their Freedom Will Endure/All Art Shall Flourish in Columbia's Land/And All her Sons Join as One Social Band" painted: below shield: "SOLID AND PURE." painted: above shop image: "SOC
Gallery Label: 
This banner was carried by the Society of Pewterers of the City of New York in the Federal Procession of July 23, 1788, which celebrated the ratification of the Constitution of the United States. It is one of the only banners known to have survived from celebratory parades held in such cities as Baltimore, Charleston, Philadelphia, and Boston. The banner descended in the family of pewterer William J. Elsworth (1746-1814), who presumably carried the banner in the New York procession.
Bibliography: 
Bach, Debra Schmidt. "Witness to history: Furniture and historic relics." The Magazine Antiques 167 (2005): 162-167.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1788
eMuseum Object ID: 
28593
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

William Pitt, the Elder, First Earl of Chatham (1708-1778)

Classification: 
Collections: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Date: 
ca. 1770
Medium: 
Marble
Dimensions: 
Overall: 71 x 29 x 29 in. ( 180.3 x 73.7 x 73.7 cm )
Description: 
Portrait (full-length)
Credit Line: 
Gift of Mr. Simon F. Mackie
Object Number: 
1864.5
Marks: 
plaque: bronze plaque: "MARBLE STATUE OF WILLIAM PITT (LORD CHATHAM)/ THIS STATUE WAS ERECTED BY THE COLONY OF NEW YORK SEPTEMBER 7, 1770 AT THE INTERSECTION OF WALL AND WILLIAM STREETS IT WAS MUTILATED BY THE BRITISH SOLDIERS SOON AFTER THEIR OCCUPATION
Gallery Label: 
This statue of William Pitt was commissioned by the colonists of New York to commemorate the English statesman who had lobbied Parliament successfully on their behalf for the repeal of the Stamp Act. The statue stood at the intersection of Wall and William Streets. After the British took possession of New York City in the fall of 1776, they decapitated the friend of the colonists and broke off his arms. The statue was removed from Wall Street in 1788.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1770
eMuseum Object ID: 
28587
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Armchair

Classification: 
Collections: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Highlight: 
Display this item in the highlights
Date: 
1785-1789
Medium: 
Mahogany; pine, poplar
Dimensions: 
Overall: 37 3/4 x 24 1/2 x 21 in. ( 95.9 x 62.2 x 53.3 cm )
Description: 
Mahogany Federal-style armchair; tri-lobed crest rail, straight stiles, and pierced slat with interlacing design with a central four-leaf flower with bellflowers below; serpentine arms; square seat upholstered over the rail with serpentine front rail and brass tacks at lower edge; square molded legs with side, rear, and medial stretchers; brass plaques affixed beneath seat rail describes use of chair in inaugurations of Washington, Grant, and Garfield; seat reupholstered.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Edmund B. Southwick
Object Number: 
1916.7
Marks: 
Label: brass plaque on crest rail (left) inscribed "USED BY PRESIDENT U.S. GRANT/ AT HIS INAUGURATION MARCH 4, 1873" Label: brass plaque on crest rail (center) inscribed "CHAIR USED AT THE INAUGURATION OF/ GEORGE WASHINGTON/ AS THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITE
Gallery Label: 
After being sworn in as president of the United States on the balcony of New York City's Federal Hall on April 30, 1789, George Washington sat in this armchair in the Senate chamber, where he delivered his inaugural address to members of Congress. The chair was subsequently used for the inaugurations of Ulysses S. Grant in 1873 and James A. Garfield in 1881.
Provenance: 
Federal Hall, New York City; to William Coventry Henry Waddell (1802-1844); to his descendant Edmund B. Southwick
Bibliography: 
Bach, Debra Schmidt. "Witness to history: Furniture and historic relics." The Magazine Antiques 167 (2005): 162-167.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1789
eMuseum Object ID: 
28481
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Collection Highlights
Creative: Tronvig Group