Subway controller

Classification: 
Collections: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
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Date: 
1904
Medium: 
Silver, steel, ebony
Dimensions: 
Overall: 8 1/4 x 9 1/8 x 2 7/8 in. ( 21 x 23.2 x 7.3 cm )
Description: 
Cast silver and steel presentation train controller handle with a molded circular pivot at on end and a molded ebony grip with plunger attached to the top of the opposite end; embossed across the top of the handle, "CONTROLLER HANDLE/ USED BY/ THE HON. GEORGE B. McCLELLAN, MAYOR OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK/ IN STARTING THE FIRST TRAIN ON THE/ RAPID TRANSIT RAILROAD FROM CITY HALL STATION/ NEW YORK, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27TH, 1904." in roman letters; embossed on the side of the handle, "PRESENTED TO THE HON. GEORGE B. McCLLAN/ BY AUGUST BELMONT,/ PRESIDENT. INTERBOROUGH RAPID TRANSIT COMPANY." in roman letters; makers' marks stamped on the side.
Credit Line: 
Gift of George B. McClellan
Object Number: 
1922.103
Gallery Label: 
New York City mayor George B. McClellan used this sterling silver subway controller to start the city's first subway train on its maiden voyage on October 27, 1904. August Belmont, president of the Interborough Rapid Transit Railroad, presented the hefty handle during the festivities at City Hall. McClellan was so intoxicated by the speed of the train that he raced through the scheduled station stop at 42nd Street and continued uptown, only yielding the controls to the company's conductor at 103rd Street.
Provenance: 
Presented by August Belmont (1816-1890); to George B. McClellan, Jr. (1865-1940), the donor.
Bibliography: 
Bach, Debra Schmidt. "Witness to history: Furniture and historic relics." The Magazine Antiques 167 (2005): 162-167.
Date Begin: 
1904
Date End: 
1904
eMuseum Object ID: 
38418
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Seated Man Writing, from the Economical School Series

Classification: 
Collections: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Date: 
c. 1810-14
Medium: 
Black chalk, charcoal, and gray wash on light blue paper
Dimensions: 
Overall: 7 5/8 x 6 in. ( 19.4 x 15.2 cm ) mat: 14 x 12 in. ( 35.6 x 30.5 cm )
Description: 
Figure
Credit Line: 
Purchase
Object Number: 
1953.274f
Gallery Label: 
This sketch is one of nineteen drawings made by the baroness at the Economical School (Ecole Economique) which Baron Hyde de Neuville was instrumental in founding in New York in 1810 "to promote instruction, to render it economical, and to afford some education to the children of French emigrants and other strangers." The sketches represent students and others on the premises in various poses of study and daily activity.
Provenance: 
De Neuville family, France; E. De Vries, Paris, 1928; Columbia University Press Book Store, NYC, 1929; Old Print Shop, NYC, 1953
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1810
eMuseum Object ID: 
37942
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Slant-front desk

Collections: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
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Date: 
1777-1794
Medium: 
Mahogany
Dimensions: 
Overall: 42 3/4 x 27 3/4 x 21 1/2 in. ( 108.6 x 70.5 x 54.6 cm )
Description: 
Mahogany slant-top desk with top opening in two parts to reveal a center section fitted for tools; working surface flanked on either side by three tiered drawers above three stacked drawers; below is a central drawer over three smaller drawers in line, all of which are flanked by a deep drawer on one side and a compartment with a door made to look identical to the drawer front on the other side; scalloped apron; square legs and stretchers; approximately 165 tools housed separately.
Credit Line: 
Gift of an Anonymous Donor
Object Number: 
1947.461
Gallery Label: 
This desk and set of goldsmithing tools belonged to acclaimed miniaturist John Ramage (ca. 1748-1802), who was active in New York City between 1777 and 1794. The tools were used by the artist to create and decorate the delicate cases that frame his elegant portraits. The Historical Society's extensive collection of miniatures, comprising nearly 800 examples, includes thirteen portraits by Ramage.
Provenance: 
Purchased by the donors from the Hobby House, Hollander Brothers, 103 West 43rd Street.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1794
eMuseum Object ID: 
37803
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Framed leaves from Abraham Lincoln's bier

Classification: 
Collections: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Date: 
1865
Medium: 
Albumen photograph, plant material, ink, silk ribbon, wood gilding
Dimensions: 
Framed: 8 3/4 x 7 1/4 x 1 in. (22.2 x 18.4 x 2.5 cm)
Description: 
Spray of laurel taken from Abraham Lincoln's bier while he lay in state at City Hall; in gilded oval frame together with small cut-out albumen photograph of Lincoln and a black and white crossed ribbon. Inscription below.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Mrs. Georgine Wood Charlton, 1947
Object Number: 
1947.47
Marks: 
inscribed: in ink below laurel: "[Th]is laurel lay on President Lincoln's heart/while lying in state for three days in/City Hall in New York April 25th/1865" inscribed: in pencil on reverse of frame: "Gift of Mrs. Georgine Wood Charlton/ 2/11/47 /Taken f
Gallery Label: 
This laurel was taken by Jeremiah Wood from Abraham Lincoln's bier while he lay in state in City Hall. After Lincoln's assassination, his funeral train arrived in New York City early on 24 April. The cortege followed a route from Desbrosses Street to City Hall Park, and Lincoln's body lay in state at City Hall from 1 p.m. until noon the next day, when the cortege traveled up Broadway to the depot of the Hudson River Railroad.
Bibliography: 
Holzer, Harold, ed. "Lincoln and New York." New York: The New-York Historical Society and London: Philip Wilson Publishers Ltd., 2009. Holzer, Harold and The New-York Historical Society. "The Civil War in 50 Objects." New York: Viking, 2013.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1865
eMuseum Object ID: 
37565
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Grenadier cap

Collections: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
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Date: 
1740-1770
Medium: 
Wool, linen
Dimensions: 
Overall: 13 x 10 1/2 x 3 3/4 in. ( 33 x 26.7 x 9.5 cm )
Description: 
Tall, roughly triangular grenadier cap; front of red wool with embroidery in light brown yarn consisting of eight-pointed star surrounded by stanchions superimposed with serpentine branches, and inscription "AUT VINCE AUT MORI"; reverse with three panels of blue wool with linen piping above a red wool band embroidered with a grenade at center and a crossed sword and musket on either side; small pompon attached to point of cap; linen lining.
Credit Line: 
Purchase
Object Number: 
1890.3
Marks: 
embroidered: top of front: "AUT VINCE AUT MORI"
Gallery Label: 
This cap, which was purchased from an antique shop in New London, Conn., was probably the headdress of some independent grenadier company formed in Connecticut prior to the Revolutionary War. It is said to have been worn at the Battle of Fort Griswold (or Groton) in 1781. (See Charles M. Lefferts, "The Connecticut Grenadier Cap," in The New-York Historical Society Quarterly Bulletin, April 1920, pp. 21-23.)
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1770
eMuseum Object ID: 
36484
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Chatelaine

Classification: 
Collections: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
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Date: 
ca. 1761
Medium: 
Silver gilt, gold, enamel, ivory, chalcedony, glass, paint
Dimensions: 
overall (box): 2 1/8 x 8 1/4 x 4 3/8 in. ( 5.4 x 21 x 11.1 cm ) overall (chatelaine): 1 1/8 x 4 3/8 x 7 5/8 in. ( 2
Description: 
Silver gilt chatelaine hook with three chased and embossed gold plaques connected by four chains; cast hook plate embossed with scene of Mars and Venus; plaque below with scene of putto; second plaque with scene of classical warrior seated in triumphal canopy; third plaque with putto; chains suspended from sides of hook plate with attached hinged and mounted bloodstone box, shield-shaped enameled gold "R" locket with woven hair enclosed, coral trumpet charm, gold and glass oculus locket with painted flower, and painted ivory miniature in gold case; watch in gold case suspended from bottom plaque. Reverse of watchcase has chased allegorical scene of a water god with a river goddess bearing flowers.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Mrs. Edward Rutledge and daughters
Object Number: 
1954.179a-d
Marks: 
engraved: reverse of hook: "Henry and Cornelia Remsen / M 28 Dec. 1761" stamped: reverse of hook: "WB" engraved: reverse of miniature: "John Henry Remsen / B 2 Aug. 1772 / D 15 Sept. 1798"
Gallery Label: 
A symbol of domesticity and status, this chatelaine was given to Cornelia Dickenson Remsen (1744-1816) by her husband Henry Remsen (1736-1792) as a wedding gift in 1761. Henry Remsen was a successful New York City commission merchant from one of the city's most distinguished landholding families. It is uncertain if Remsen specially ordered this chatelaine from London or purchased it from a New York jeweler. Chatelaines were suspended from clips and hung from a belt at the waist. During the early eighteenth century, when chatelaines first became fashionable for elite women, they often secured small household implements from the hooks or plaques, such as sewing scissors, thimbles, notebooks enclosed in metal cases, and watches.
Provenance: 
Given to Cornelia Dickenson Remsen (1744-1816), who married Henry Remsen (1736-1792); to their daughter Sarah Remsen (1786-1871); to her niece Elizabeth Remsen Grafton (1824-1901); to her niece Amelia Schuchardt Stuyvesant (1839-1915); chatelaine (without watch) to her niece Julia Lawrence Wells (1868-1954) in 1891; watch purchased about 1915 by her mother Sarah Remsen Schuchardt (1841-1926) and returned to Julia Lawrence Wells; reunited chatelaine and watch to Lily Wells (Mrs. Edward Rutledge, 1873-1959), the donor.
Bibliography: 
Olson, Roberta J. M. "A selection of European paintings and objects." The Magazine Antiques 167 (2005): 182-187.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1761
eMuseum Object ID: 
36125
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Brandywine bowl (brandewijnkom)

Classification: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
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Date: 
ca. 1700
Medium: 
Silver
Dimensions: 
Overall: 5 3/4 x 12 3/8 x 8 3/4 in. ( 14.6 x 31.4 x 22.2 cm ) Silver Weight: 21 oz (troy) 6 dwt (662 g)
Description: 
Raised silver two-handled lobate bowl; deep, bowl-shaped body, with sides curved out from an applied, molded footring with a stamped "x" band and an applied six lobed, scalloped base, and back to an inward sloping rim; sides divided into six panels by deep, chased vertical "U"-shaped lines, lines are punched inward at the top to give a lobed affect to the lip; in each panel an escutcheon-shape is formed by deep chased lines, with scrolls below; within each escutcheon are repoussé chased flowers, alternating tulips and pinks with lightly engraved scrolls at each side; center of the bowl has a repoussé chased floral motif surrounded by six trefoils; two cast, c-scroll, caryatid handles applied at the lip and the mid body, forked at the lower terminal, beaded down the sides; engraved, "P/ C * M" in block letters in the lower center of one lobe; engraved in the opposite lobe, "E. D. P." in the lower center; engraved center of bowl, "H. C. de Peyster" in script; maker's mark on the lip.
Credit Line: 
Bequest of Catherine Augusta De Peyster
Object Number: 
1911.38
Marks: 
Inscription: engraved at lower center of one lobe: "P/ C * M" in block letters Inscription: engraved at opposite lobe: "E. D. P." Inscription: engraved script at center front: "H. C. de Peyster" Mark: stamped at lip: "W. K/ B" in a heart outline surr
Gallery Label: 
The brandywine bowl, a decorative vessel favored by elite families of Dutch descent, embodies the perpetuation of Dutch tradition in New York. Brandywine bowls are traditionally associated with the Dutch ritual of the kindermaal, a celebratory feast held in honor of a mother and her newborn child. This bowl is engraved with three sets of initials, which trace the bowl's ownership through six generations of the De Peyster family. The earliest set indicates that the bowl was made to celebrate the birth of one of the children of New York City merchant Cornelis De Peyster and his wife, Maria Bancker, who married in 1694.
Provenance: 
Cornelis De Peyster (1673-1749) and his wife Maria Bancker (1675-1710); possibly descended to his nephew, Abraham De Peyster, Jr. (1696-1767), who married Margaretta Van Cortlandt (1694-1769); to their son James A. De Peyster (1726-1799), who married Sarah Reade (1724-1802); to their son Colonel Abraham De Peyster (1753-1799), who married Catherine Augusta Livingston (1759-1839); to their daughter Harriot Charlton De Peyster (1788-after 1870); to her niece Catherine Augusta De Peyster (1835-1911), the donor.
Bibliography: 
Hofer, Margaret K. "Seventeenth-and eighteenth-century family silver." The Magazine Antiques 167 (2005): 156-160. Krohn, Deborah, Peter Miller, and Marybeth De Filippis, eds., "Dutch New York Between East and West: The World of Margrieta van Varick." New York: Bard Graduate Center, New-York Historical Society, New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2009, p. 216-7
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1700
eMuseum Object ID: 
34957
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Kast

Classification: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
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Date: 
1675-1690
Medium: 
Walnut, walnut veneer, elm, oak, ebony
Dimensions: 
Overall: 87 x 88 1/2 x 29 in. ( 221 x 224.8 x 73.7 cm )
Description: 
Walnut Baroque kas; detachable overhanging molded cornice with applied central cartouche with two shields surmounted by a helmet and surrounded by foliate carving, above carved lion's mask; carved cherubs surrounded by foliate carving on front corners; rectangular case with two raised-panel doors with center stile attached to right-hand door, band of foliate carving with two putti on rail above door, vertical bands of foliate carving on side and center stiles, interior contains two shelves with drawers below shelves; separate base unit with long drawer with two wooden knobs (ebony), ornamented to look like two raised-panel drawers divided by central stile; drawer fronts, side and center stiles ornamented with foliate carving; two platform feet with depressed ball front feet (elm with oak tenons).
Credit Line: 
Gift of Dr. Fenwick Beekman
Object Number: 
1941.914
Gallery Label: 
This ample wardrobe, or kast, was made in the Dutch Republic and descended in the Keteltas and Beekman families of New York. Kasten were often part of a woman's dowry and were regarded as status symbols. This example was probably brought to New Amsterdam by the maternal ancestors of Jane Keteltas, who married James Beekman in 1752. Kasten became less popular in the American colonies by the mid-eighteenth, but continued to be important reminders of Dutch ancestry.
Bibliography: 
Krohn, Deborah, Peter Miller, and Marybeth De Filippis, eds., "Dutch New York Between East and West: The World of Margrieta van Varick." New York: Bard Graduate Center, New-York Historical Society, New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2009, p. 256-8
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1690
eMuseum Object ID: 
34595
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Panoramic View of New York City (in Eight Sections)

Collections: 
Classification: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Date: 
1842-45
Medium: 
Black ink over graphite on eight sheets of ivory paper with partial black ink borders, laid on Japanese paper
Dimensions: 
Overall: 13 3/16 x 240 in. (33.5 x 609.6 cm) Each (section): 13 1/2 x 30 in. (34.3 x 76.2 cm) Frame: 19 1/2 x 66 1/2
Credit Line: 
Gift of Mrs. Harold Farquhar Hadden (Valerie Burckhardt), daughter of the artist
Object Number: 
1915.76
Provenance: 
Descent through artist's family
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1845
eMuseum Object ID: 
34138
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Salver

Classification: 
Collections: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Highlight: 
Display this item in the highlights
Date: 
1772-1773
Medium: 
Silver
Dimensions: 
Overall: 1 1/2 x 21 3/4 in. ( 3.8 x 55.2 cm ) Silver Weight: 95 oz (troy) 5 dwt (2962 g)
Description: 
Wrought silver presentation salver; circular tray with raised, nine lobed sides with an applied molded and gadrooned rim; floral border engraved around the edge of the tray; center of the tray engraved with the Seal of the City of New York, windmill blades divide two beavers and two cider barrels, engraved around this, "This Piece of Plate is the Gift of His Exely. Govr. Tryon, the Genel.: Assemy.: of New-York, to Capt. Sowers Engineer. 13 Mar.h 1773" in roman letters, between a man in Colonial dress holding a plumb line and a Native American holding a bow, each with one hand raised, colonial man touching a fleet of ships, Native American touching a wooded area; seal surmounted by a crown and foliate scrolls and above a banner engraved, "SIGILL/ CIVITAT * NOV/ EBORA" over crossed cannons and military and engineering implements; tray applied to three cast hairy paw feet with five claws, one back, four forward, around a circular bar; descent of the salver engraved on the reverse; maker's mark stamped on the base.
Credit Line: 
Gift of J. Lawrence Aspinwall
Object Number: 
1928.24
Marks: 
Mark: stamped on the base: "L. Feuter" in script in a conforming rectangle @ reverse near bottom right foot Inscription: engraved script at reverse on the base: This piece of plate/ was given to Captain Thomas Sowers in 1773,/ who gave it to his daughter
Gallery Label: 
Measuring almost twenty-two inches in diameter and embellished with extraordinary engraving depicting the seal of the City of New York, this salver stands as a masterpiece of colonial American presentation silver. On March 13, 1773, Royal Governor William Tryon (1729-1788) and the General Assembly of New York presented the engineer Captain Thomas Sowers (1740-1774) with this magnificent salver as a token of appreciation for his services in repairing the Battery at the tip of Manhattan, a critical site for the defense of the colonies. Sowers, a young but experienced British army engineer, publicly acknowledged the extravagant gift two days later in the New-York Gazette and Weekly Mercury, thanking Tryon for the "Piece of Plate" and affirming his willingness to be "ever ready to give my Assistance as an Engineer on any future Occasion. . . ."
Provenance: 
Thomas Sowers (1740-1774), who married Ann Myer (1748-1774); to their daughter Ann Sowers (1772-1842), who married Gilbert Aspinwall (1768-1819); to their daughter Sarah Ann Aspinwall (1799-1882), who married James Lawrence Moore (1797-1848); to their nephew James Lawrence Aspinwall (1854-1936), the donor.
Bibliography: 
Hofer, Margaret K. "Seventeenth-and eighteenth-century family silver." The Magazine Antiques 167 (2005): 156-161.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1773
eMuseum Object ID: 
33729
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

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