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The Game of Phoebe Snow

Object Number: 
2000.445
Date: 
1909
Medium: 
Cardboard, paper, wood
Dimensions: 
Open (board): 15 3/4 × 16 5/8 in. (40 × 42.2 cm) Container (box): 1 1/4 × 8 3/4 × 16 3/8 in. (3.2 × 22.2 × 41.6 c
Marks: 
lithographed: on the board: "CHICAGO/ NEW YORK/ ROCKY MOUNTAINS/ SAN FRANSISCO" lithographed: on the box: "Game of/ Phoebe/ Snow/ 5353/ COPYRIGHT 1909/ McLOUGHLIN BROS/ NEW YORK."
Description: 
"The Game of Phoebe Snow" board game with board, four turned wooden playing pieces, and a spinner in a paper covered cardboard box; board has a winding path and image of a train moving past a train station, each corner has an image of a place passed in order to travel from New York to San Fransisco including Chicago and the Rocky Mountains; board inscribed, "CHICAGO/ NEW YORK/ ROCKY MOUNTAINS/ SAN FRANCISCO"; box cover lithographed with an image of Phoebe Snow in a white coat wearing an oversized hat with ostrich feathers and carrying a case and an umbrella; box cover inscribed, "Game of/ Phoebe/ Snow/ 5353/ COPYRIGHT 1909/ McLOUGHLIN BROS/ NEW YORK."
Gallery Label: 
The product of a now-forgotten advertising genius, Miss Phoebe Snow was the fictional character, perennially attired in a spotless white dress and gloves, used to promote the Lackawanna Railroad's use of a clean-burning form of coal called anthracite. In this game, players race across the country in a train, boarding in New York City and debarking in San Francisco. Travel games such as Phoebe Snow reflected America's growing tourism industry, which was energized by marketing efforts aimed at..
Bibliography: 
Hofer, Margaret K. "The Games We Played: The Golden Age of Board & Table Games." New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2003.
Credit Line: 
The Liman Collection
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.
Creative: Tronvig Group