Mary Beekman

Classification: 
Date: 
1767
Medium: 
Oil on canvas
Dimensions: 
Overall: 36 x 28 in. ( 91.4 x 71.1 cm )
Credit Line: 
Gift of the Beekman Family Association
Object Number: 
1962.74
Gallery Label: 
This is one of the six portraits of his eldest children James Beekman (1732-1807) commissioned from John Durand in the 1760s. Mary Beekman, known as both Maria and Polly, is pictured here at age two. The young girl embraces a lamb, a traditional symbol of innocence and Christian virtue, while the flowers strewn about signify femininity. She later married Stephen N. Bayard, uniting the Beekmans with another prominent New York family of Dutch heritage. John Durand (1731-1805) first began working in Virginia in 1765, but by 1766 had moved to New York City to paint portraits of the Beekman children for their father James Beekman. Durand’s background and training are unknown, but his use of rococo colors, interest in historical paintings and reference to his name in French lead art historians to believe he was born or trained in France. He left New York in 1768 as one of the city’s most celebrated painters and returned to Virginia, where he lived for most of the remainder of his life. The style of his late work executed in Virginia changed notably, never garnering him the critical acclaim and popular response his early New York portraits had received. All six portraits of the Beekman children bear elaborately carved and gilded frames by the New York carver James Strachan, which are superior examples of rococo ornament, a style all the rage among the American colonial elite during the mid-eighteenth century. The children's portraits, as well as those of James Beekman and his wife, remained in the Beekman family until presented to the New-York Historical Society through the Beekman Family Association.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1767
eMuseum Object ID: 
58208
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Catharine Beekman

Classification: 
Date: 
1767
Medium: 
Oil on canvas
Dimensions: 
Overall: 36 x 28 in. ( 91.4 x 71.1 cm )
Credit Line: 
Gift of the Beekman Family Association
Object Number: 
1962.73
Gallery Label: 
This is one of the six portraits of his eldest children James Beekman (1732-1807) commissioned from John Durand in the 1760s. Catharine Beekman, nicknamed Caty, is shown at age five holding a bird, a common household pet in colonial America and perhaps the bird James purchased for his wife in 1764. That the young girl could train a bird to perch on her hand was a sign of her exceptional character. Caty also fingers the stem of a potted flowering plant placed on an architectural pediment, a pose strikingly similar to that of the Duchess of Bolton, as depicted in a popular engraving of the time. According to her father’s account book, Caty attended the school of Mrs. Ann Rogers from 1770 to 1773 and that of Lydia Belknap in 1773. In 1805 she married Elisha Boudinot, a lawyer and New Jersey Supreme Court Justice. John Durand (1731-1805) first began working in Virginia in 1765, but by 1766 had moved to New York City to paint portraits of the Beekman children for their father James Beekman. Durand’s background and training are unknown, but his use of rococo colors, interest in historical paintings and reference to his name in French lead art historians to believe he was born or trained in France. He left New York in 1768 as one of the city’s most celebrated painters and returned to Virginia, where he lived for most of the remainder of his life. The style of his late work executed in Virginia changed notably, never garnering him the critical acclaim and popular response his early New York portraits had received. All six portraits of the Beekman children bear elaborately carved and gilded frames by the New York carver James Strachan, which are superior examples of rococo ornament, a style all the rage among the American colonial elite during the mid-eighteenth century. The children's portraits, as well as those of James Beekman and his wife, remained in the Beekman family until presented to the New-York Historical Society through the Beekman Family Association.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1767
eMuseum Object ID: 
58207
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Sowing the Word

Classification: 
Date: 
1868
Medium: 
Oil on linen
Dimensions: 
Overall: 44 1/2 x 56 1/4 in. ( 113 x 142.9 cm ) frame: 59 1/4 x 70 1/4 x 4 1/2 in. ( 150.5 x 178.4 x 11.4 cm )
Credit Line: 
Gift of the Estate of Isaac Newton Phelps Stokes
Object Number: 
1948.158
Gallery Label: 
Daniel Huntington is best known as a portraitist but also painted landscapes as well as genre and allegorical subjects. This work, executed in grand-manner fashion, depicts a scholar teaching the Bible, presumably, to two young women who appear to represent temporal and spiritual beauty. The painting also reflects Huntington's extensive study of Old Master history painting from the Renaissance and Baroque periods during several trips to Europe. The richly adorned and distracted woman at the left recalls similar figures in the work of the Flemish Baroque painter Peter Paul Rubens (1577-1640), while the more modest and attentive central figure resembles women depicted by the English pre-Raphaelite artists. The scholar at the right recalls similar figures by the Venetian Renaiisance painter Paolo Veronese (1528-1588). Other art historical references include the illuminated manuscript page depicting St. Luke, the patron saint of artists, at his easel, and the painting in the background alcove depicting the Madonna and Child enthroned. The painting bears an exceptional American frame that combines the traditional use of gold leaf with the dark hand carved wood associated with aesthetic movement frames.
Provenance: 
Collection, Anson P. Stokes, 1869
Bibliography: 
"Fine Arts," The New York Times, April 16, 1869, p. 1. The New York Times, April 30, 1869, p. 4. "Table Talk," Appletons' Journal, Vol. 1, May 8, 1869, p. 186. "The National Academy of Design, Forty-Fourth Annual Exhibition, South Room," New York Daily Tribune, May 22, 1869, p. 1. Watson, Henry C.,Ed., "National Academy of Design," Watson's Art Journal, Vol. XI, No. 6, June 5, 1869, p. 74. Montgomery, Walter, ed., "Daniel Huntington, President of the National Academy of Design," American Art and American Art Collections: Essays on Artistic Subjects by the best art writers, fully illustrated with etchings, photoetchings, photogravures, phototypes, and engravings on steel and wood by the Most Celebrated Artists, Boston: E.W. Walker & Co., 1978, pp. 19-37. Koke, Richard J., American Landscape and Genre Paintings in the New York Historical Society, Vol. I, New York: The New-York Historical Society, 1982, p. 187. Greenhouse, Wendy, The American Portrayal of Tudor and Stuart History, 1835-1865, Volume I, A Dissertation Presented to the Faculty of the Graduate School of Yale University in Candidacy for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy, May, 1989, pp. ix, 115, 461. Zendell, Robin, Barnard College, October, 1991 n.p. Greenhouse, Wendy, "Daniel Huntington and the Ideal of Christian Art," Winterthur Portfolio Vol. 31, No. 2/3, Summer-Autumn 1996, pp. 103-40. Gallati, Barbara Dayer, "American Genre painting and the Rise of 'Average Taste,'" The Magazine Antiques, November/December, 2011, pp. 134-141.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1868
eMuseum Object ID: 
58043
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Brooklyn Bridge

Classification: 
Date: 
1939
Medium: 
Oil on artboard
Dimensions: 
Overall: 16 1/2 x 12 7/8 in. ( 41.9 x 32.7 cm )
Description: 
Illustrated is a view of a street corner, which is located in the shadows of the Brooklyn Bridge. On the foremost right corner stands a street light and two green-roofed multi-story buildings-one red and one light brown. The building closest to the street corner has a porch leading up to the second floor and a vendor sign in the front, possibly denoting a store located on the first floor of the building. On the opposite side of the street are two parked vehicles-one reddish-brown truck and one black car. At least three structures can be discerned, the salient of which is a two story red building with long black windows. Standing in front of that particular structure is a non-gendered individual who appears to be staring up in quiet awe at the architectural marvel located behind the several unimpressive structures on the left side of the street. It is also significant to note that the artist painted the street, the sidewalk, and the sky all in the same hues of gray and brown. Signed in lower left: DE Tirefort 39
Credit Line: 
Gift of Mrs. Florence Slobin, in memory of Herman Slobin
Object Number: 
1979.74
Marks: 
signature and date: lower left: "De Tirefort / 39"
Gallery Label: 
By utilizing subdued and bleak hues of gray and brown, the artist mixes a kind of routine perfunctory with a quiet sense of ever-present amazement at the architectural wonder of the Brooklyn Bridge. By adding the non-gendered yet true-to-life human element, the artist embodies a sense of reticent enduring appreciation that transcends all attempts at verbalized praise. Originally a European artist, Bella de Tirefort moved to NYC producing many works, which he often sold in Washington Sq.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1939
eMuseum Object ID: 
57596
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Ethel Jackson (1877-1957)

Classification: 
Date: 
1905
Medium: 
Oil on canvas
Dimensions: 
Overall: 57 1/2 x 49 in. ( 146 x 124.5 cm )
Description: 
A portrait of the famous Broadway star, Ethel Jackson. Ms. Jackson is facing forward-head bent slightly to the right-with her left arm resting on an ivy-dotted stone wall in what appears to be a garden; there is a pink rose bush to her right, a tree in the background towards the left and a stunning backdrop of the ocean. Her dark hair is covered by a black hat and her beige dress is adorned with lace sleeves and a floral embellishment. Grasped in her right hand is a pink shawl, which is also draped over her left arm. Revealed on the subject's left hand ring finger is a diamond ring, possibly denoting either marriage or engagement.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Ethel Jackson
Object Number: 
1934.15
Marks: 
inscription: lower right: "H. Hanatschek 1905"
Gallery Label: 
Native New Yorker Ethel Jackson, the great-granddaughter of the artist Henry Inman, was a singer and actress whose career dated from the turn of the century. Although she regularly appeared on Broadway, she is primarily remembered for her role as Sonia in the first New York production of Franz Lehar's The Merry Widow at the New Amsterdam Theatre. As for her personal life, she was married first to J. Frederick Zimmerman, Jr., then to Benoni Lockwood, Jr., and finally to George McLeod Baynes.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1905
eMuseum Object ID: 
57593
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

New York Back Yard Scene

Classification: 
Date: 
1924
Medium: 
oil on artboard
Dimensions: 
Overall: 12 x 16 x 1 in. ( 30.5 x 40.6 x 2.5 cm ) Frame: 17 3/4 x 21 1/2 in. (45.1 x 54.6 cm)
Description: 
Separated from several residential buildings by two stone walls and a street are five children, four of whom are sitting on a bench on the side of first wall. The children appear to be clapping in amusement to a blonde woman in a white dress who is dancing on the cracked sidewalk. In the center background is a multi-level white building with two stores of windows. Towards the right is a red building, equipped with fire escapes and half covered in shadow. White clothes adorn the backyard and stretch from the red building to a patch of trees at the far left. Also, white sheets are sprawled on the further wall, which is separated from the houses by a street. Signed in lower right: Howard Thain '24
Credit Line: 
Gift of Mrs. Howard Thain
Object Number: 
1974.58
Gallery Label: 
Known for depicting some of NYC's poorest blocks, Howard Thain uses "New York Back Yard Scene" to represent a run of the mill day in a lower income NYC neighborhood during the roaring twenties. This painting provides a fascinating look at the working class mixture of daily responsibilities, as represented by hanging laundry, with archetypal roaring twenties revelry, as shown by the footloose bobbed-haired woman in white being applauded by plainly dressed children.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1924
eMuseum Object ID: 
57594
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

East River, N.Y.C.

Classification: 
Date: 
1939
Medium: 
Oil on canvas
Dimensions: 
Overall: 32 1/4 x 40 in. ( 81.9 x 101.6 cm )
Description: 
A view of Manhattan from either Brooklyn or New Jersey piers. There is a black-hulled, red-banded vessel tied up on the right and a green tugboat on the extreme left. Behind the latter is a red tugboat. Seagulls and smoke from the various vessels fill the scene. However, most notably illustrated are two pier workers on the lower left, dressed in work clothes and taking a cigarette break. Signed in the lower left hand corner: George Parker.
Credit Line: 
Purchase, James B. Wilbur Fund
Object Number: 
1940.200
Gallery Label: 
In this view "from the other side of the river," -- either the East or the Hudson and therefore from Brooklyn or New Jersey, respectively -- the painting depicts the basic workings of the harbor, exemplified by the 'common' laborer and the working vessels.
Bibliography: 
Bland, Bartholomew F., et al. Industrial Sublime: Modernism and the Transformation of New York's Rivers, 1900-1940. Yonkers: Hudson River Museum, 2013.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1939
eMuseum Object ID: 
57586
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Calvin Coolidge (1872-1933)

Classification: 
Date: 
1931
Medium: 
Oil on canvas
Dimensions: 
Overall: 50 x 40 in. ( 127 x 101.6 cm )
Description: 
A portrait of Calvin Coolidge and one of his many pets, his dog. The subject is sitting in a Queen Anne style chair in front of drapery and a plant place on a nearby windowsill. He is wearing a brown suit with a vest and a dark tie and is depicted with his right arm around a white and yellow dog, which is wearing a collar. Signed in lower right: DeWitt M. Lockman
Credit Line: 
Painted from life for the Society
Object Number: 
1931.44
Marks: 
signature: lower right: ""DeWitt M. Lockman" inscription: on back: "Calvin Coolidge, 30th President of the U.S. / Painted at his home in Northampton, Mass. / November 1931. By DeWitt M. Lockman, N.A."
Gallery Label: 
This portrait is one of twelve portraits of eminent Americans presented by the artist to the New-York Historical Society between 1930 and 1933. The artist was a guest in the home of the former president for two weeks while he painted this portrait.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1931
eMuseum Object ID: 
57584
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Eastside Drive

Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1940
Medium: 
Oil on canvas
Dimensions: 
Canvas: 20 × 16 in. (50.8 × 40.6 cm) Frame: 22 1/8 × 18 1/4 × 1 3/4 in. (56.2 × 46.4 × 4.4 cm)
Description: 
East River flowing alongside the newly-built East River Drive, which has the profile of buildings along its left side. Hell Gate and Triboro bridges in the distance. Small boat at near center and other boats near the bridges.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Nina Garsoïan
Object Number: 
2001.303
Gallery Label: 

Painted from an apartment window overlooking the Eastside Drive as it neared completion in the early 1940s, this view is unusual for the absence of traffic on what was to become a daylong bearer of auto traffic around Manhattan's periphery. Inna Garsoian was born in the North Caucasus and trained as a painter in Moscow and then at the Petrograd Academy. Moving to Paris, she became an assistant designer of costumes and scenery for Diaghilev's Ballet Russes, work she continued in the theater after her 1933 emigration to New York.

Bibliography: 
Bland, Bartholomew F., et al. Industrial Sublime: Modernism and the Transformation of New York's Rivers, 1900-1940. Yonkers: Hudson River Museum, 2013.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1940
eMuseum Object ID: 
57518
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

"Brooklyn Bridge"

Classification: 
Date: 
1990
Medium: 
Oil on canvas
Dimensions: 
Overall: 52 x 62 in. ( 132.1 x 157.5 cm )
Description: 
Night view of Brooklyn Bridge, drawn from left to upper right side of canvas. Lights reflect in the water of the East River. Thick impasto and highly expressionistic
Credit Line: 
Purchase
Object Number: 
2002.8
Gallery Label: 
Iconic Brooklyn Bridge repeatedly captures artists' imaginations, never more so than in this nocturn. Gaon prefers night scenes and views Manhattan's bridges as the pillars upon which the City's urban vibrancy is built.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1990
eMuseum Object ID: 
57502
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

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