Peter Van Brugh Livingston (1792-1868)

Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1819
Medium: 
oil on linen
Dimensions: 
Overall: 30 x 24 x 1 in. ( 76.2 x 61 x 2.5 cm )
Credit Line: 
Gift of the Ossining Historical Society through the courtesy of Mrs. Donald Ferguson.
Object Number: 
1959.58
Gallery Label: 
Peter Van Brugh Livingston, son of Philip Peter and Cornelia (Van Horne) Livingston, graduated from Columbia College in 1811. He married Harriet Elizabeth Houstoun. In 1848 President James Polk appointed him minister to Ecuador.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1819
eMuseum Object ID: 
58822
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

The Bulls and Bears in the Market

Classification: 
Collections: 
Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Highlight: 
Display this item in the highlights
Date: 
1879
Medium: 
Oil on linen
Dimensions: 
Overall: 39 x 61 x 2 in. ( 99.1 x 154.9 x 5.1 cm ) Framed: 50 1/4 × 71 1/4 × 4 1/4 in. (127.6 × 181 × 10.8 cm)
Description: 
The setting for this picture is Broad Street, New York City, looking north, in front of the New York Stock Exchange which appears at the left; the columned Sub Treasury Building at the corner of Wall and Nassau Streets appears in the distance.
Credit Line: 
Purchase, Thomas Jefferson Bryan Fund
Object Number: 
1971.104
Gallery Label: 
William Holbrook Beard, who worked in New York City from 1859 until his death, earned a reputation as one of America's finest animal painters. Many of his paintings employed animals to mimic and satirize human behavior, thus participating in a tradition dating back to antiquity. In the "Bulls and Bears in the Market," Beard employed bears to symbolize "bearish" (conservative) investors, and bulls to represent "bullish" (aggressive) investors. These came into usage on Wall Street in the late 19th century- "bulls" referred to investors who bought stocks cheap in hope of a rise, and "bears" to those who sold stocks for future delivery, hoping that meanwhile the prices would drop. Beard may have been inspired in part by the stock market crash of 1873, which produced the worst depression in nineteenth-century America. In 1882, an American art critic described the conflict depicted in the Bulls and Bears in the Market: "No recent work of Mr. Beard's is more elaborate, or more plainly shows the resources of his imagination, than the great painting entitled Bulls and Bears in Wall Street. Through this thoroughfare, the financial centre of New York and of the United States, we see a vast crowd of struggling bears and bulls rending each other in a tremendous conflict for the master. They are all in dead earnest; it is evident that they have serious work on hand. But the severity of the battle is relieved by touches of humor, such as a bear tossed in the air or a bull with a tuft of wool on his horns. In a side eddy a bear is seen sitting on the pavement busily examining the hide of a bull he has slaughtered and plundered; in another corner a bear is observed busily engaged in studying his account book. In the foreground a magnificent bull with triumphant mien stands forward as champion, and seems to claim the battle for his comrades. The hue and cry of the Stock Exchange, the vast nervous energy, the terrific passions and the tragedies and successes of that maelstrom of life in the nineteenth century, have never before been suggested with such vividness and power." The setting for this painting is Broad Street, looking north. The New York Stock Exchange occupied the building at the left from 1865 until its demolition in 1901. The current New York Stock Exchange was constructed on the same site in 1903. The columned building on the right, located at the corner of Wall and Nassau Streets, is one of the finest examples of Greek Revival architecture in New York City. It was designed by the firm of Ithiel Town and Alexander Jackson Davis, who derived their design from the Parthenon. This building served as the U.S. Custom House (1842-1862) and the U.S. Sub-Treasury (1862-1925), before being designated the Federal Hall National Memorial, which commemorates the site of George Washington's inauguration as the first President of the United States (1789).
Provenance: 

J. N. Bartfield Art Galleries, New York City

Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1879
eMuseum Object ID: 
58776
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

The Rush Hour, New York City

Classification: 
Date: 
1906
Medium: 
Oil on canvas
Dimensions: 
Overall: 32 x 44 in. ( 81.3 x 111.8 cm )
Description: 
The scene depicts City Hall Park and Printing House Square at the approach of the Brooklyn Bridge in Lower Manhattan.
Credit Line: 
Gift of George A. Zabriskie
Object Number: 
1947.9
Gallery Label: 
Featuring a view of City Hall Park and Printing House Square at the approach to the Brooklyn Bridge, this painting was one of a series of impressionist works Cooper began executing in 1902 that recorded the changing face and modernity of New York City at the turn of the twentieth century.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1906
eMuseum Object ID: 
58708
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Kool and Mild Today

Classification: 
Date: 
1991
Medium: 
Oil on canvas
Dimensions: 
Overall: 60 x 57 in. ( 152.4 x 144.8 cm )
Description: 
The painting depicts the area near the artist's studio in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. It documents the tenements, graffiti, and garbage-strewn streets that characterize the area. The East River and the Manhattan skyline are seen in the distance, a contrast of both architecture and lifestyle.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Richard D. and Monica M. Segal
Object Number: 
1992.7
Marks: 
inscriptions: Inscribed at lower right: "Safranek 1991"
Gallery Label: 
Douglas Safranek (b. 1956) reveived his Master of Fine Arts degree in 1984 from the University of Wisconsin. He is known for his work in egg tempera.
Provenance: 
1991 Schmidt-Bingham Gallery, New York, to Monica and Richard Segal
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1991
eMuseum Object ID: 
58707
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Mrs. William Cutting (ca. 1776-1864)

Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1886
Medium: 
Oil on canvas
Dimensions: 
canvas: 45 3/4 x 35 in. ( 116.2 x 88.9 cm ) frame: 59 x 48 x 6 in. ( 149.9 x 121.9 x 15.2 cm ) image: 45 x 34 in.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Orazio J. and Diane E. Di Rocco of West Chester, PA
Object Number: 
2006.27.1
Gallery Label: 
This portrait of Gertrude Livingston Cutting (ca. 1776-1864) was painted from a photograph by Raimundo de Madrazo Y Garreta, a successful portrait artist from Spain who lived and worked mostly in Paris, but also established a successful studio in New York on West 45th Street catering to the city's wealthy upper class after his arrival in 1897. Both in Paris and New York, he won commissions from a number of prominent New Yorkers including the Vanderbilts, Robert L Stuart, and the Cuttings. He studied under his father, the Spanish artist Federico de Madrazo, who served as portrait painter to the Spanish Court. The Society owns three other paintings by Madrazo-two portraits and a view of a Moorish interior. Gertrude Livingston Cutting was the second daughter of Walter Livingston (1740-1797) and Cornelia (Schuyler) Livingston. On July 6, 1798, she married William Cutting (1773-1820), third son of the Rev. Leonard Cutting (q.v.). He was a prominent lawyer with offices at 91 Water Street. The couple had nine children: William Leonard (1799-1826), Francis Brockholst (1804-1870), Henry Livingston (1806-1821), Charles Grenville (1808-1890), Julia Gertrude (1810-1834), Robert Livingston (q.v.), Anne Frances (later Baroness Ruebell of Paris through marriage to Baron Alfred Ruebell) (1813-1887), Fulton (1816-1875), and Walter Livingston (b. 1817) Cutting. Robert Fulton (q.v.) married Mrs. Cutting's younger sister Harriet in 1808. The cousin of Gertrude and Harriet, Robert R. Livingston (1746-1813) ventured to establish a nationwide steamboat empire through his alliance with Fulton, leading him to play a major role in the 19th century technological revolution. (See Cynthia Owen Philip, "Robert R. Livingston: Enthusiastic Inventor, Prudent Entrepreneur" The Livingston Legacy, Bard College, 1987) During her lifetime, Mrs. Cutting became the possessor of entire Cutting estate. She died on Staten Island on July 5, 1864, the last surviving child of the late Walter Livingston, of Livingston Manor. Mrs. Cutting's portrait (posthumous, from a photograph) may have been painted at the same time as N-YHS 1944.175, a portrait of her grandson Robert Livingston Cutting, Jr.'s, which was painted by Madrazo in 1886.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1886
eMuseum Object ID: 
58704
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Judith Carter Moale Cutting

Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1886
Medium: 
Oil on canvas
Dimensions: 
canvas: 45 3/4 x 35 in. ( 116.2 x 88.9 cm ) frame: 59 x 48 x 6 in. ( 149.9 x 121.9 x 15.2 cm )
Credit Line: 
Gift of Fine Art in memory of my late husband Orazio J. Di Rocco
Object Number: 
2006.27.2
Gallery Label: 
This portrait of Judith Carter Moale Cutting (1843-1916) was painted from a photograph by Raimundo de Madrazo Y Garreta, a successful portrait artist from Spain who lived and worked mostly in Paris, but also established a successful studio in New York on West 45th Street catering to the city's wealthy upper class after his arrival in 1897. Both in Paris and New York, he won commissions from a number of prominent New Yorkers including the Vanderbilts, Robert L Stuart, and the Cuttings. He studied under his father, the Spanish artist Federico de Madrazo, who served as portrait painter to the Spanish Court. The Society owns three other paintings by Madrazo-two portraits and a view of a Moorish interior. Judith Carter Moale was born into one of Baltimore's old and distinguished families. In 1867, she married the grandson of Gertrude Livingston Cutting, Robert Livingston Cutting, Jr., a union that brought Judith into the heart of New York's elite upper class. Her husband was a successful stockbroker in his family's firm and was a millionaire at the time of his death. He was active in city politics and was a member of some of New York's most elite clubs. The couple lived on fashionable Fifth Avenue and had three sons, one of whom died young. Their eldest, also named Robert Livingston Cutting, Jr., was the source of some scandal. Disinherited by his parents after eloping with a stage actress, he was eventually sued by Mrs. Cutting, accused of embezzling a portion of her fortune. This imbroglio was followed closely by the press and made headlines in the New York Times. By marriage, the Cuttings were related to some of New York's best-known families, including the Ramsays, Murrays, Livingstons and Mills-all of whom are represented in the N-YHS collection--and had social ties to many others. Judith Cutting moved to Paris, without her husband, around 1885 and remained there for the next thirty years, until her death. The portrait of Mrs. Cutting was likely painted in France, and was based on her photograph. Madrazo also painted her husband's portrait in 1886 (1944.175), but in a smaller format, which the Society acquired from his niece as part of a gift of family portraits that also included a large well-executed pastel portrait in profile of Mrs. Cutting by Stanton and Butler (1944.176), as well as a number of swords-one from the Civil War-a pair of epaulets, a watercolor bearing a coat of arms for Walter Cutting, and an embroidered coat of arms.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1886
eMuseum Object ID: 
58703
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Nahant Rock and Seashore

Classification: 
Collections: 
Date: 
1859
Medium: 
Oil on canvas
Dimensions: 
canvas: 18 x 30 in. ( 45.7 x 76.2 cm ) Frame: 23 x 34 1/2 x 3 1/4 in. ( 58.4 x 87.6 x 8.3 cm )
Credit Line: 
The Robert L. Stuart Collection, the gift of his widow Mrs. Mary Stuart
Object Number: 
S-84
Marks: 
Signed and dated lower right: JF.K. ’61. [JF conjoined]
Bibliography: 
Koke, Richard J., American Landscape and Genre Paintings in the New York Historical Society, Vol. II, New York: The New-York Historical Society, 1982, p. 242. Bennewitz, Kathleen Motes, "John F. Kensett at Beverly, Massachusetts," American Art Journal, Vol. 21, No. 4, Winter, 1989, pp. 47-65.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1859
eMuseum Object ID: 
58667
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Seashore

Classification: 
Collections: 
Date: 
1861
Medium: 
Oil on canvas
Dimensions: 
Canvas: 18 x 30 in. (45.7 x 76.2 cm) Frame: 27 3/8 × 39 1/2 × 4 1/2 in. (69.5 × 100.3 × 11.4 cm)
Credit Line: 
The Robert L. Stuart Collection, the gift of his widow Mrs. Mary Stuart
Object Number: 
S-42
Marks: 
signature and date: LR: JFK '61
Gallery Label: 
Kensett, who was initially an engraver, was among a group of artists who sailed in 1840 with Durand for Europe, where he would remain for almost a decade. He renewed his friendship with Durand on his return, sketching with him and others in the Adirondacks and Catskills after his return to New York in 1847. Kensett also visited Newport, Rhode Island and other sites on the northeastern coast, becoming as well known for seascapes as for landscapes. Seashore reveals an unexpectedly painterly treatment of shoreline scenery in the work of a painter better known for his visions of luminist quietude.
Provenance: 
Robert L. Stuart, N.Y.C. (purchased from the artist, 1861)
Bibliography: 
Koke, Richard J., American Landscape and Genre Paintings in the New York Historical Society, Vol. II, New York: The New-York Historical Society, 1982, p. 239.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1861
eMuseum Object ID: 
58666
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Steamboat "Iron Witch"

Classification: 
Date: 
1846
Medium: 
Oil on canvas
Dimensions: 
Overall: 26 x 38 in. ( 66 x 96.5 cm ) frame: 33 x 45 in. ( 83.8 x 114.3 cm )
Credit Line: 
Gift of Samuel Verplanck Hoffman
Object Number: 
1929.146
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1846
eMuseum Object ID: 
58655
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Mrs. Sigismund Kronberg (1820-1890)

Classification: 
Date: 
1850-1860
Medium: 
Oil on canvas
Dimensions: 
Overall: 35 x 28 in. ( 88.9 x 71.1 cm )
Credit Line: 
Gift of Harmon H. Goldstone
Object Number: 
2001.311
Gallery Label: 
Mrs. Sigismund Kronberg, Née Katherine Herzog, was born in 1820 and died October 18, 1890.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1860
eMuseum Object ID: 
58266
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

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Creative: Tronvig Group