Cityscape (West View, Empire State Building)

Classification: 
Date: 
1982
Medium: 
Oil on canvas
Dimensions: 
Overall (a): 62 in. × 10 ft. 7 3/4 in. (157.5 cm × 3 m 24.5 cm) Overall (b): 62 in. × 10 ft. 7 7/8 in. (157.5 cm ×
Credit Line: 
Gift of Altria Corporate Services, Inc.
Object Number: 
2008.16.6a-d
Gallery Label: 
These paintings are from a larger mural cycle executed in 1982 for the Philip Morris Company, now known as Altria. The series comprises 22 paintings, totaling nearly 200 running feet. It was commissioned for the basement-level corporate dining room in the company’s building at Park Avenue and 42nd Street. Installed around the entire perimeter of the dining room, the murals offered employees a trompe l’oeil, panoramic view of Manhattan that was identical to the one that could be seen from the executive suites on the 26th floor of the building. Haas worked from photographs that he made from the roof of the building adjacent to the Philip Morris building, ensuring a precise view of the city skyline. As a suite, this series demonstrates the witty use of architectural space that is typical of the artist’s work. In the original windowless basement setting for Cityscape, Haas offered diners a bright panorama of the city. Other works by Haas include similarly unexpected views. A mural at 112 Prince Street depicts windows and architectural details on a formerly blank wall, and his work on the Con Edison substation at Peck Slip includes illusionistic buildings and a “view” of the Brooklyn Bridge.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1987
eMuseum Object ID: 
63124
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Cityscape (South View, World Trade Center)

Classification: 
Date: 
1982
Medium: 
Oil on canvas
Dimensions: 
Each: 13ft. 3 in. x 5ft. 8 1/2 in. (403.9 x 174 cm)
Credit Line: 
Gift of Altria Corporate Services, Inc.
Object Number: 
2008.16.5a-k
Gallery Label: 
These paintings are from a larger mural cycle executed in 1982 for the Philip Morris Company, now known as Altria. The series comprises 22 paintings, totaling nearly 200 running feet. It was commissioned for the basement-level corporate dining room in the company’s building at Park Avenue and 42nd Street. Installed around the entire perimeter of the dining room, the murals offered employees a trompe l’oeil, panoramic view of Manhattan that was identical to the one that could be seen from the executive suites on the 26th floor of the building. Haas worked from photographs that he made from the roof of the building adjacent to the Philip Morris building, ensuring a precise view of the city skyline. The canvases in this group feature part of the southern view from the Philip Morris building, including the World Trade Center Towers, the Statue of Liberty, and the Empire State Building. They belong to the 11-part section of the mural that depicts the entire width of the island and part of Brooklyn. As a suite, this series demonstrates the witty use of architectural space that is typical of the artist’s work. In the original windowless basement setting for Cityscape, Haas offered diners a bright panorama of the city. Other works by Haas include similarly unexpected views. A mural at 112 Prince Street depicts windows and architectural details on a formerly blank wall, and his work on the Con Edison substation at Peck Slip includes illusionistic buildings and a “view” of the Brooklyn Bridge.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1987
eMuseum Object ID: 
63123
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Cityscape (East View, Chrysler Building)

Classification: 
Date: 
1982
Medium: 
Oil on canvas
Dimensions: 
Overall (a): 62 in. × 10 ft. 8 in. (157.5 cm × 3 m 25.1 cm) Overall (b): 62 in. × 10 ft. 7 3/4 in. (157.5 cm × 3 m
Credit Line: 
Gift of Altria Corporate Services, Inc.
Object Number: 
2008.16.4a-d
Gallery Label: 
These paintings are from a larger mural cycle executed in 1982 for the Philip Morris Company, now known as Altria. The series comprises 22 paintings, totaling nearly 200 running feet. It was commissioned for the basement-level corporate dining room in the company’s building at Park Avenue and 42nd Street. Installed around the entire perimeter of the dining room, the murals offered employees a trompe l’oeil, panoramic view of Manhattan that was identical to the one that could be seen from the executive suites on the 26th floor of the building. Haas worked from photographs that he made from the roof of the building adjacent to the Philip Morris building, ensuring a precise view of the city skyline. As a suite, this series demonstrates the witty use of architectural space that is typical of the artist’s work. In the original windowless basement setting for Cityscape, Haas offered diners a bright panorama of the city. Other works by Haas include similarly unexpected views. A mural at 112 Prince Street depicts windows and architectural details on a formerly blank wall, and his work on the Con Edison substation at Peck Slip includes illusionistic buildings and a “view” of the Brooklyn Bridge.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1987
eMuseum Object ID: 
63122
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Cityscape (North View, Pan Am Building)

Classification: 
Date: 
1982
Medium: 
Oil on canvas
Dimensions: 
Each (a and b): 61 1/2 in. × 9 ft. 8 in. (156.2 × 294.6 cm) Overall (c): 61 1/2 in. × 9 ft. 7 1/2 in. (156.2 × 293.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Altria Corporate Services, Inc.
Object Number: 
2008.16.3a-c
Gallery Label: 
These paintings are from a larger mural cycle executed in 1982 for the Philip Morris Company, now known as Altria. The series comprises 22 paintings, totaling nearly 200 running feet. It was commissioned for the basement-level corporate dining room in the company’s building at Park Avenue and 42nd Street. Installed around the entire perimeter of the dining room, the murals offered employees a trompe l’oeil, panoramic view of Manhattan that was identical to the one that could be seen from the executive suites on the 26th floor of the building. Haas worked from photographs that he made from the roof of the building adjacent to the Philip Morris building, ensuring a precise view of the city skyline. As a suite, this series demonstrates the witty use of architectural space that is typical of the artist’s work. In the original windowless basement setting for Cityscape, Haas offered diners a bright panorama of the city. Other works by Haas include similarly unexpected views. A mural at 112 Prince Street depicts windows and architectural details on a formerly blank wall, and his work on the Con Edison substation at Peck Slip includes illusionistic buildings and a “view” of the Brooklyn Bridge.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1987
eMuseum Object ID: 
63121
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Page Boys

Classification: 
Date: 
1982
Medium: 
Acrylic on canvas
Dimensions: 
Each (a and b): 7 ft. 10 in. × 65 in. (238.8 × 165.1 cm) Overall (c): 13 in. × 6 ft. 2 in. (33 × 188 cm)
Credit Line: 
Gift of Altria Corporate Services, Inc.
Object Number: 
2008.16.2a-c
Gallery Label: 
These paintings are from a larger mural cycle executed in 1982 for the Philip Morris Company, now known as Altria. The series comprises 22 paintings, totaling nearly 200 running feet. It was commissioned for the basement-level corporate dining room in the company’s building at Park Avenue and 42nd Street. Installed around the entire perimeter of the dining room, the murals offered employees a trompe l’oeil, panoramic view of Manhattan that was identical to the one that could be seen from the executive suites on the 26th floor of the building. Haas worked from photographs that he made from the roof of the building adjacent to the Philip Morris building, ensuring a precise view of the city skyline. As a suite, this series demonstrates the witty use of architectural space that is typical of the artist’s work. In the original windowless basement setting for Cityscape, Haas offered diners a bright panorama of the city. Other works by Haas include similarly unexpected views. A mural at 112 Prince Street depicts windows and architectural details on a formerly blank wall, and his work on the Con Edison substation at Peck Slip includes illusionistic buildings and a “view” of the Brooklyn Bridge.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1987
eMuseum Object ID: 
63120
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Roof View of Manhattan

Classification: 
Date: 
1982
Medium: 
Oil on canvas
Dimensions: 
Overall: 8ft. 3 in. x 27ft. 3 in. (251.5 x 830.6 cm)
Credit Line: 
Gift of Altria Corporate Services, Inc.
Object Number: 
2008.16.1
Gallery Label: 
These paintings are from a larger mural cycle executed in 1982 for the Philip Morris Company, now known as Altria. The series comprises 22 paintings, totaling nearly 200 running feet. It was commissioned for the basement-level corporate dining room in the company’s building at Park Avenue and 42nd Street. Installed around the entire perimeter of the dining room, the murals offered employees a trompe l’oeil, panoramic view of Manhattan that was identical to the one that could be seen from the executive suites on the 26th floor of the building. Haas worked from photographs that he made from the roof of the building adjacent to the Philip Morris building, ensuring a precise view of the city skyline. As a suite, this series demonstrates the witty use of architectural space that is typical of the artist’s work. In the original windowless basement setting for Cityscape, Haas offered diners a bright panorama of the city. Other works by Haas include similarly unexpected views. A mural at 112 Prince Street depicts windows and architectural details on a formerly blank wall, and his work on the Con Edison substation at Peck Slip includes illusionistic buildings and a “view” of the Brooklyn Bridge.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1987
eMuseum Object ID: 
63119
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Almeda's Daughter

Classification: 
Date: 
1937
Medium: 
Oil on Canvas
Dimensions: 
Overall: 29 1/2 x 23 1/2 in. (74.9 x 59.7 cm)
Credit Line: 
Gift of David Toorchen in memory of his father Harold Aaron Toorchen
Object Number: 
2008.5
Gallery Label: 

Katherine Schmidt created this frank portrait of the daughter of her African American maid, Almeda, in 1937. Schmidt studied at the Art Students League and was one of the earliest members of the Whitney Studio Club. This work was first exhibited in a one-woman show at Edith Halpert's Downtown Gallery in 1939. The New York Times commented: "Katherine Schmidt, whose realistic and humorous genre subjects are well known, has turned to the 'social scene' for her latest inspiration . . . workmen, shopgirls and everyday types . . ."

Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1942
eMuseum Object ID: 
62883
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Harlem River Panorama I

Classification: 
Date: 
1956
Medium: 
Oil on canvas
Dimensions: 
Overall: 24 x 126 1/2 x 2 1/4 in. (61 x 321.3 x 5.7 cm)
Description: 
Born and raised in the Bronx, Daniel Hauben is acclaimed as one of the borough’s most versatile and prolific painters. Working in both oil and pastel, he has spent 30 years capturing the life of the Bronx, working en plein air throughout and around the borough. Vivien Raynor, writing in the New York Times in 1988 noted, “it is no great exaggeration to say that the borough – its projects, tenements and elevated railroads, its grungy colors, is to Mr. Hauben what Giverny was to Monet.” Hauben echoes this assessment: “I’m a landscape painter,” he says. “It just so happens that the landscape I paint is most often the Bronx.” His work naturally complements the Historical Society’s seminal American landscape collection both aesthetically and historically –documenting an area fast undergoing changes first in the name of progress and now gentrification. Of his acquisition of this work, Henry Luce told Jan Ramirez that he purchased it never knowing anything about the artist, but simply liking it visually: “It’s the city I know.”
Credit Line: 
Gift of Lila Luce and H. Christopher Luce in memory of Henry Luce III
Object Number: 
2007.18.3
Gallery Label: 
Born and raised in the Bronx, Daniel Hauben is acclaimed as one of the borough’s most versatile and prolific painters. Working in both oil and pastel, he has spent 30 years capturing the life of the Bronx, working en plein air throughout and around the borough. Vivien Raynor, writing in the New York Times in 1988 noted, “it is no great exaggeration to say that the borough – its projects, tenements and elevated railroads, its grungy colors, is to Mr. Hauben what Giverny was to Monet.” Hauben echoes this assessment: “I’m a landscape painter,” he says. “It just so happens that the landscape I paint is most often the Bronx.” Of his acquisition of this work, Henry Luce III commented that he purchased it never knowing anything about the artist, but simply liking it visually: “It’s the city I know.”
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1956
eMuseum Object ID: 
62664
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Wild Chase

Classification: 
Date: 
1942
Medium: 
Oil on canvas
Dimensions: 
Overall: 16 x 20 in. (40.6 x 50.8 cm)
Description: 
Steve Wheeler is considered the leading member of the group identified as the Indian Space Painters who achieved prominence in 1940s New York. Although based upon an internalization of Native American imagery, primarily from the Pacific Northwest (that he studied at both the American Museum of Natural History and the Brooklyn Museum), Wheeler’s work is intensely personal and based not only on visual sources, but also numerous literary references. Wheeler’s personal library amounted to over 3,000 volumes and it is this mixture of art, artifact and text in his work that makes it particularly well suited to the collections of the Historical Society. Wild Chase, a signigicant example of Wheeler's early 1940s style, – his most important decade – was included in [add Montclair Art Museum exh cite].
Credit Line: 
Gift of Lila Luce and H. Christopher Luce in memory of Henry Luce III
Object Number: 
2007.18.2
Gallery Label: 
Steve Wheeler is considered the leading member of the group identified as the Indian Space Painters who achieved prominence in 1940s New York. Although based upon an internalization of Native American imagery, primarily from the Pacific Northwest (that he studied at both the American Museum of Natural History and the Brooklyn Museum), Wheeler’s work is intensely personal and based not only on visual sources, but also numerous literary references. "Wild Chase" is a signigicant example of Wheeler's early 1940s style.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1942
eMuseum Object ID: 
62663
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

New York Window

Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1940-49
Medium: 
Oil on canvas
Dimensions: 
Overall: 30 x 40 in. (76.2 x 101.6 cm)
Credit Line: 
Gift of the family of Gifford Beal
Object Number: 
2007.16
Gallery Label: 

The painting depicts the view of Central Park West from the artist's apartment on West 67th Street. Teh sculpture by Aristide Maillol (1861-1944) is still in the family's collection.

Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1954
eMuseum Object ID: 
62624
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - PAINTINGS
Creative: Tronvig Group