Frances Tobias Hendricks (1809-1881)

Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1860-1881
Medium: 
Oil on canvas
Dimensions: 
Overall: 27 × 22 in. (68.6 × 55.9 cm) Framed: 35 × 30 1/4 in. (88.9 × 76.8 cm)
Credit Line: 
Gift of Ruth Hendricks Schulson
Object Number: 
2012.28.4
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1881
eMuseum Object ID: 
69236
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Uriah Hendricks (1802-1869)

Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1860-1869
Medium: 
Oil on canvas
Dimensions: 
Overall: 29 7/8 × 24 3/16 in. (75.9 × 61.4 cm) Frame (oval): 34 1/8 × 28 1/8 in. (86.7 × 71.4 cm)
Credit Line: 
Gift of Ruth Hendricks Schulson
Object Number: 
2012.28.3
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1869
eMuseum Object ID: 
69235
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Harriet Tobias Hendricks (1812-1874)

Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1830s-1840s
Medium: 
Oil on canvas
Dimensions: 
Overall: 30 × 25 1/4 in. (76.2 × 64.1 cm) Framed: 33 × 28 1/2 in. (83.8 × 72.4 cm)
Credit Line: 
Gift of Ruth Hendricks Schulson
Object Number: 
2012.28.2
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1849
eMuseum Object ID: 
69234
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Henry Hendricks (1804-1861)

Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1830s-1840s
Medium: 
Oil on canvas
Dimensions: 
Framed: 39 × 32 × 2 1/2 in. (99.1 × 81.3 × 6.4 cm)
Credit Line: 
Gift of Ruth Hendricks Schulson
Object Number: 
2012.28.1
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1849
eMuseum Object ID: 
69233
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Portrait of John M. Bowers

Classification: 
Medium: 
Oil on canvas
Dimensions: 
Overall: 16 x 14 1/8 x 2 in. (40.6 x 35.9 x 5.1 cm)
Credit Line: 
Gift of Ned Bowers
Object Number: 
2011.41.2
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
0
eMuseum Object ID: 
69008
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Portrait of Spotswood Bowers

Classification: 
Medium: 
Oil on canvas
Dimensions: 
Overall: 19 x 15 in. (48.3 x 38.1 cm)
Credit Line: 
Gift of Ned Bowers
Object Number: 
2011.41.1
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
0
eMuseum Object ID: 
69007
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Mrs. Jacob Wendell

Classification: 
Date: 
1888
Medium: 
Oil on canvas
Dimensions: 
Framed: 70 1/2 × 47 1/2 × 3 1/2 in. (179.1 × 120.7 × 8.9 cm) Unframed: 60 1/4 × 36 in. (153 × 91.4 cm)
Description: 
Portrait of Mary Barrett Wendell (1832-1912) by John Singer Sargent. The fifty-six-year-old woman wears a splendid gown accented with iridescent Indian beetle-wing embroidery, her hair is fashionably dressed, and she is flanked by a luxuriant arrangement of hydrangeas.
Credit Line: 
Gift of the Roger and Susan Hertog Charitable Fund and Jan and Warren Adelson
Object Number: 
2012.21
Marks: 
Signed lower left: "John S. Sargent" Dated upper right: 1888
Gallery Label: 
John Singer Sargent painted this portrait of Mary Barrett Wendell (1832-1912) in May 1888, at the close of his first professional foray on American soil. The sitter was a daughter of the Boston merchant Nathaniel Augustus Barrett and the former Sally Dorr. Both families had deep colonial roots and the Dorrs had made a fortune in the fur trade. She married Jacob Wendell in Boston in 1854, approximately a year after he had moved from his native Portsmouth, New Hampshire, and joined the firm of J.C. Howe & Co., agents in woollen sales.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1888
eMuseum Object ID: 
68658
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

View from the Hospital

Classification: 
Date: 
2006
Medium: 
Oil on canvas
Dimensions: 
Canvas: 11 x 16 in. (27.9 x 40.6 cm)
Description: 
View from the Hospital is based on a photograph. It depicts the Brooklyn Heights skyline highlighting the contrast between high rises and brownstones in the neighborhood.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Laura Shechter
Object Number: 
2012.13
Gallery Label: 
View from the Hospital, 2006 is a cityscape by Brooklyn-based artist, Laura Shechter. Born in Brooklyn in 1944, Shechter trained with Ad Reinhardt at Brooklyn College shortly before his death in 1967. Known for much of her career for her still life paintings and drawings, Shechter turned to cityscapes in 2002. Her work is represented in both U.S. and international collections. She has exhibited extensively in New York and throughout the nation since the 1970s. Instead of painting from direct observation as she does when completing still lifes, Shechter bases her cityscapes on photographs. The inspiration behind View from the Hospital was a photograph of the Brooklyn Heights neighborhood taken during a visit to a friend in the hospital. In her cityscapes, Shechter is interested in capturing the geometry of the urban environment while revealing its decorative relationship with the natural landscape. In many of these works, including View from the Hospital, a clearly defined horizon separates sky from architecture. In the foreground, size and scale of the architecture are often emphasized by parallel and perpendicular lines. In View from the Hospital, the middle ground of the skyscrapers is governed by verticality, which is contrasted by comparatively diminutive brownstones in the immediate foreground. Such juxtaposition highlights the architectural and historical differences between "old" and "new" Brooklyn.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
2006
eMuseum Object ID: 
68538
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Soldier's escutcheon of John T. Lockman (1834-1912)

Classification: 
Date: 
ca. 1880
Medium: 
Oil on canvas
Dimensions: 
Overall: 38 x 31 in. (96.5 x 78.7 cm)
Description: 
Painting depicts quartered shield designating the ranks, positions, units, and battles of Brigadier General John T. Lockman; shield enclosed by foliate surround and topped with eagle; soldier's name and rank in ribbon below. Painting in original gilt plaster frame with beaded lining.
Credit Line: 
Gift of the family of John Lockman Helmuth, Sr., Grandson of John T. Lockman
Object Number: 
2012.6
Gallery Label: 
Soldier’s escutcheons or memorials, which graphically illustrate a soldier’s military career, were popular during and after the Civil War. This example was made after the war to summarize the prodigious career of Brigadier General John T. Lockman (1834-1912), a New Yorker who served for the full duration of the war in several regiments, including the 119th New York Volunteers. A young law student at the outbreak of the war, he enlisted as a private in Company C of the 9th Regiment, New York State Militia. Climbing the ranks, Lockman was a commissioned officer participating at Chancellorsville, Gettysburg and other major battles. He also participated in the siege of Atlanta, and was brevetted brigadier-general “for meritorious services in the capture of Atlanta.” At the close of the war he continued his law studies and went on to work for the New York firm of DeWitt, Lockman & DeWitt. The Lockman escutcheon was painted by the firm of J.P. Reynolds & Company of Salem, Massacusetts. In 1868, John P. Reynolds patented a system of displaying a veteran’s service record as a work of art, using a quartered shield to designate the veteran’s ranks, positions, units, and the battles in which he participated. Reynolds displayed examples at the 1876 Centennial Exposition, including escutcheons of well-known leaders such as General Ulysses Grant and William T. Sherman.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1885
eMuseum Object ID: 
68167
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Pop Shop Ceiling

Classification: 
Date: 
1986
Medium: 
Acrylic and latex on drywall with aluminum armature
Dimensions: 
Overall: 348 x 48 x 5 in. (883.9 x 121.9 x 12.7 cm)
Description: 
In 12 sections.
Credit Line: 
Gift of the Keith Haring Foundation, Inc.
Object Number: 
2011.17a-l
Gallery Label: 
Keith Haring was synonymous with New York's downtown art scene in the 1980s. With encouragement from Andy Warhol (1928-1987) and defying criticism that his work would become overly commerical, Haring openend the Pop Shop at 292 Lafayette Street in SoHo in 1986 with the goal of making his art accessible to a wide range of people. Haring conceived of the Pop Shop as "an extended performance," a place where "collectors could go, but also where kids from the Bronx, visitors from out of town, and whoever" could find T-shirts, stickers, badges, and other products bearing images of his work. Haring covered the interior of the shop - ceiling, walls, even the floor - with a single continuous mural in his signature graffiti-inflected style, boldly executed in black and white. After the artist's death from AIDS in 1990, the Keith Haring Foundation continued to run the Pop Shop unitl 2005, when rent increases forced it to close. During its nineteen years in operation the floor and walls of the shop required extensive repainting, making the ceilig the only original portion of the mural in existence. Today, a quarter century after it had opened, the historical importance of the Pop Shop in blurring contemporary lines between culture and commerce, high and low art, public and private spaces has only increased.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1986
eMuseum Object ID: 
67846
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

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Creative: Tronvig Group