Tea Rex

Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Object name: 
Date: 
Medium: 
Stainless steel, plastic
Dimensions: 
Overall: 10 × 8 3/4 × 8 3/4 in. (25.4 × 22.2 × 22.2 cm)
Place Made: 
Description: 
Credit Line: 
Purchase, 20th- and 21st-Century Acquisition Fund
Object Number: 
2017.47
Marks: 
Inscriptions: 
Gallery Label: 
Provenance: 
Bibliography: 
Prior Exhibitions: 
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
0
eMuseum Object ID: 
78032
Exclude from TMS update: 
3
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Mason jar

Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Object name: 
Date: 
1923-1933
Medium: 
Molded glass, wax or plastic, metal
Dimensions: 
Overall: 7 1/2 in. × 3 7/8 in. (19.1 × 9.8 cm)
Place Made: 
Description: 

Canning or food storage jar.

Credit Line: 
Gift of Jim Picinich
Object Number: 
2017.22.3
Marks: 
“Ball / IDEAL” embossed on jar front; “10” embossed on bottom
Inscriptions: 
Gallery Label: 

“Mason Jars” are a generic term for utilitarian glass food storage jars. Philadelphia tinsmith John Landis Mason patented one of the first threaded jars or bottles with a screw-type lid in 1858. Thereafter, numerous variations of durable glass food storage jars were produced by glass manufacturers across the United States, and referred to as “Mason” jars.

Provenance: 
Bibliography: 
Prior Exhibitions: 
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1933
eMuseum Object ID: 
79405
Exclude from TMS update: 
3
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Mason jar

Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Object name: 
Date: 
Medium: 
Molded glass, wax or plastic, metal
Dimensions: 
Overall: 8 × 3 7/8 × 3 3/8 in. (20.3 × 9.8 × 8.6 cm)
Place Made: 
Description: 

Canning or food storage jar.

Credit Line: 
Gift of Jim Picinich
Object Number: 
2017.22.6
Marks: 
“S K O / Queen / TRADE MARK / Wide Mouth / ADJUSTABLE” embossed on front; “TIGHT” embossed on front and back of mouth rim. Bottom embossed: “SMALLEY / KIVLAN / ONTHANK / BOSTON / UNION MADE”
Inscriptions: 
Gallery Label: 

“Mason Jars” are a generic term for utilitarian glass food storage jars. Philadelphia tinsmith John Landis Mason patented one of the first threaded jars or bottles with a screw-type lid in 1858. Thereafter, numerous variations of durable glass food storage jars were produced by glass manufacturers across the United States, and referred to as “Mason” jars.

Provenance: 
Bibliography: 
Prior Exhibitions: 
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
0
eMuseum Object ID: 
79408
Exclude from TMS update: 
3
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Mason jar

Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Object name: 
Date: 
Medium: 
Molded glass, wax or plastic, metal
Dimensions: 
Overall: 5 3/4 × 4 1/8 in. (14.6 × 10.5 cm)
Place Made: 
Description: 

Canning or food storage jar.

Credit Line: 
Gift of Jim Picinich
Object Number: 
2017.22.5
Marks: 
“Atlas / E-Z / SEAL” embossed on front
Inscriptions: 
Gallery Label: 

“Mason Jars” are a generic term for utilitarian glass food storage jars. Philadelphia tinsmith John Landis Mason patented one of the first threaded jars or bottles with a screw-type lid in 1858. Thereafter, numerous variations of durable glass food storage jars were produced by glass manufacturers across the United States, and referred to as “Mason” jars.

Provenance: 
Bibliography: 
Prior Exhibitions: 
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
0
eMuseum Object ID: 
79407
Exclude from TMS update: 
3
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Mason jar

Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Object name: 
Date: 
ca. 1920
Medium: 
Molded glass, wax or plastic, metal
Dimensions: 
Overall: 5 1/2 in. × 3 3/8 in. (14 × 8.6 cm)
Place Made: 
Description: 

Canning or food storage jar.

Credit Line: 
Gift of Jim Picinich
Object Number: 
2017.22.4
Marks: 
“Drey / Ever / Improved Seal” embossed on front
Inscriptions: 
Gallery Label: 

“Mason Jars” are a generic term for utilitarian glass food storage jars. Philadelphia tinsmith John Landis Mason patented one of the first threaded jars or bottles with a screw-type lid in 1858. Thereafter, numerous variations of durable glass food storage jars were produced by glass manufacturers across the United States, and referred to as “Mason” jars.

Provenance: 
Bibliography: 
Prior Exhibitions: 
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1925
eMuseum Object ID: 
79406
Exclude from TMS update: 
3
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Mason jar

Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Object name: 
Date: 
1923-1933
Medium: 
Molded glass, wax or plastic, metal
Dimensions: 
Overall: 7 in. × 3 7/8 in. (17.8 × 9.8 cm)
Place Made: 
Description: 

Canning or food storage jar.

Credit Line: 
Gift of Jim Picinich
Object Number: 
2017.22.2
Marks: 
“Ball Perfect Mason” embossed on jar front; “1” embossed on bottom
Inscriptions: 
Gallery Label: 

“Mason Jars” are a generic term for utilitarian glass food storage jars. Philadelphia tinsmith John Landis Mason patented one of the first threaded jars or bottles with a screw-type lid in 1858. Thereafter, numerous variations of durable glass food storage jars were produced by glass manufacturers across the United States, and referred to as “Mason” jars.

Provenance: 
Bibliography: 
Prior Exhibitions: 
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1933
eMuseum Object ID: 
78460
Exclude from TMS update: 
3
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Mason jar

Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Object name: 
Date: 
1923-1933
Medium: 
Dimensions: 
Overall: 7 in. × 3 7/8 in. (17.8 × 9.8 cm)
Place Made: 
Description: 

1914 design Ball Mason Jar.

Credit Line: 
Gift of Scott Wixon
Object Number: 
2017.19
Marks: 
"Ball Perfect Mason" embossed on jar front; "1" embossed on bottom
Inscriptions: 
Gallery Label: 

“Mason Jars” are a generic term for utilitarian glass food storage jars. Philadelphia tinsmith John Landis Mason patented one of the first threaded jars or bottles with a screw-type lid in 1858. Thereafter, numerous variations of durable glass food storage jars were produced by glass manufacturers across the United States, and referred to as “Mason” jars.

Provenance: 
Bibliography: 
Prior Exhibitions: 
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1933
eMuseum Object ID: 
78855
Exclude from TMS update: 
3
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Candelabra

Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Object name: 
Date: 
ca. 1990-2010
Medium: 
Wood; seed beads; mother of pearl
Dimensions: 
Overall: 13 3/4 × 8 3/8 × 3 3/4 in. (34.9 × 21.3 × 9.5 cm)
Place Made: 
Description: 

Wooden candelabra with three lights and turned, carved, and inlaid geometric decoration; inlay materials include colored woods and beads; arms are single semi-circular piece with rosette motifs and eight suspended wooden bells; along central arm is sun-like motif with cross at center.

Credit Line: 
Gift of the Surmach Family
Object Number: 
2017.5.5
Marks: 
Inscriptions: 
Gallery Label: 

For nearly a century, Surma Books & Music Co. was a cultural hub for New York City’s Ukrainian immigrant centered community in the East Village, also known as Little Ukraine. Until its closure in 2016, the store had been located at 11 East Seventh Street since 1943.

Myron Surmach Sr., its founder, arrived at Ellis Island from the Ukraine in 1910. He settled in New York City after working various odd jobs in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Joining a Czech gymnastics group prompted him to open his shop in 1918 to sell gym clothing and Ukrainian books. It evolved into a general store, selling phonographs and washing machines, but Surmach also offered services such as letter reading. The business grew to include ethnic music publishing during the 1920s and 1930s.

During the 1950s, the store’s offerings shifted toward the marketing of “folk” through craft items and publications. Surmach’s son, Myron Jr. (1932–2003), assumed the business and began carrying products such as ceramics, religious icons, embroidered shirts, and wooden objects made by the Hutsul highlanders.

Provenance: 
Bibliography: 
Prior Exhibitions: 
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
2015
eMuseum Object ID: 
78748
Exclude from TMS update: 
3
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Milk carton

Is owned by NYHS: 
Yes
Object name: 
Date: 
ca. 1937
Medium: 
Printed and paraffin coated paper
Dimensions: 
Overall: 8 1/8 × 3 1/8 × 3 in. (20.6 × 7.9 × 7.6 cm)
Place Made: 
Description: 
Credit Line: 
Gift of Charles Cohen
Object Number: 
2017.2
Marks: 
Marks: Front and back printed: “ONE QUART / LIQUID”; “MULLER / DAIRIES / INC.”; “High Quality / Dairy Products / Since 1889”; “527 WEST 125th ST. NEW YORK, N.Y. / 52-15 METROPOLITAN AVE., / MASPETH, L.I.” and “American Can Co. Patents 20
Inscriptions: 
Gallery Label: 

This milk carton was used by Muller Dairies, Inc., a New York City dairy located in upper Manhattan and Long Island through the 1940s. Muller Dairies, Inc. was one of several New York City dairies active during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

This type of folded paper milk carton with a hanging tab closure was patented in July 1937 by J. M. Hothersall for the American Can Company of New York City and New Jersey. Paper milk cartons were designed to “insure [the] maintenance of sanitation in a container prior to and following the filling of liquid.” Self-sealing cartons were believed to permit the most hygienic way to fill milk at dairies and prevent the types of germ contamination that frequently occurred during the bottling and sealing processes involved with glass bottles.

Provenance: 

Donor found this object in a wall at 780 Greenwich St., New York City.

Bibliography: 
Prior Exhibitions: 
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1942
eMuseum Object ID: 
78438
Exclude from TMS update: 
3
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

Electric toaster

Date: 
1930-1940
Medium: 
Chrome-plated metal, Bakelite
Dimensions: 
Overall: 7 1/2 x 8 1/2 x 5 3/4 in. (19.1 x 21.6 x 14.6 cm)
Description: 
Chrome-plated metal toaster with hinged bread trays. Trays with fan shaped vents and white Bakelite handles. Four small rubber bun feet on bottom; fabric-covered electrical cord.
Credit Line: 
Gift of Mary Ann Dzupin Gallagher and Nancy Dzupin York in memory of Anna Purdes
Object Number: 
2011.10.1
Gallery Label: 
This toaster was used by the donor's great aunt, Anna Purdes (1898-1983), who came to the U.S. from Czechoslovakia in the ninteenth century and settled on the Lower East Side. The toaster required close monitoring to keep the bread from burning.
Date Begin: 
0
Date End: 
1940
eMuseum Object ID: 
67211
Due to ongoing research, information about this object is subject to change.

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Creative: Tronvig Group